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Over 3,000 West Midlands children receive financial education and other key life lessons

Funding of almost £80,000 from the Wesleyan Foundation enabled the Little Chicks Life Lessons programme to be delivered to 10 primary schools across the West Midlands. It provided 9,450 books and reached around 3,150 primary school children.

Created by Midlands businesswoman Alison Delaney, Little Chicks Life Lessons is a unique education programme focused on developing the dreams and aspirations of primary school children and equipping them with key life skills.  

Wesleyan, the Birmingham-based financial services mutual, also supported the publication and distribution of two new books by Little Chicks Life Lessons including ‘Little Chicks Nest Egg’ which was specifically created in partnership to introduce early awareness and increase children’s understanding about the importance of savings and forming healthy financial habits.

As part of the support, Wesleyan financial advisors also delivered financial wellbeing workshops and webinars to every teacher within the funded schools.

Nadeem Bashir, Principal at Shirestone Academy, one of the participating schools added: ”The Little Chicks Life Lessons programme has had a such a positive impact on our children and teachers, inspiring them to explore their dreams and aspirations in a creative and structured way, as well as developing their financial awareness at an early age. We are thankful to Little Chicks Life Lessons and to Wesleyan for the dedicated resources provided to our school and the wider support for our teachers.”    

Alison Delaney, founder of the programme said “On behalf of all the children, teachers and schools that participated in the programme and benefitted from the funding provided by Wesleyan, I want to say a huge and heartfelt thank you. Your support will have a positive impact on the confidence, skills and prospects of the young children in our region and help them to develop their aspirations and dreams as they go through life.”  

Nathan Wallis, Chief of Staff at Wesleyan, said:  “ We’re committed to supporting the customers of tomorrow understand the importance of personal finance today. That’s why we were delighted to support the Little Chicks Life Lessons education programme, a ground-breaking initiative focused on building confidence, self-belief and financial awareness in children”

Micro:bit Educational Foundation partners with Code.org to Bring Power of Physical Computing to Educators Teaching the CS Fundamentals Curriculum  

The two non-profit organisations have joined forces to empower teachers using Code.org with free micro:bit physical computing resources, helping bring code lessons to life   

 

The Micro:bit Educational Foundation, the education non-profit on a mission to inspire all children to achieve their best digital future, today announces a partnership with Code.org, a US-based education innovation non-profit, to offer teachers computing resources to complement use of the handheld micro:bit physical computing device as an extension to the Code.org CS Fundamentals curriculum.   

 

With over 70 million students and two million teachers subscribed to Code.org, this partnership will expand the reach of micro:bit’s physical computing resources to students around the world, helping both organisations achieve their shared goal of improving digital literacy and delivering richer teacher materials and tailored support to empower computer science educators in schools.   

 

Elementary school students using Code.org curriculum will now have access to new lessons which will show them how to bring code to life with a partner handheld computing device, the BBC micro:bit. Bringing a physical element to computing education is proven to greatly enhance how children – especially girls - learn how to program. Using the micro:bit helps make connections between the code entered on screen to real life, improving motivation to learn and building confidence with tech as their conceptual understanding grows.   

 

Micro:bit Educational Foundation works closely with schools, educators and some of the world’s biggest tech companies like Arm and Microsoft to help implement computing education at a young age and improve diversity in computer science. Its micro:bit programmable device is already used in over a third of UK schools and there are over 7 million in use internationally, supporting both block-based beginner coding and more advanced text-based skills.   

“Physical computing is a great way to engage students in computer science, and I’m excited that Code.org is expanding its offerings in this maker education space. We’re delighted to partner with to provide physical computing extensions to our existing courses, says Code.org CEO Hadi Partovi of the partnership.  

 

Growing a diverse pipeline of tech talent who contribute to the creation of better technology in the world begins in the classroom. We are invested in excellence in computer science education for younger students and are excited by the size of the impact we can create together with Code.org to bring the benefits of physical computing to young learners.Commented Gareth Stockdale, CEO at the Micro:bit Educational Foundation.  

 

Interested educators can learn more about the Micro:bit Educational Foundation and Code.org on their respective websites. The new micro:bit physical computing resources for CS Fundamentals are now live.  

 

 

About Micro:bit Educational Foundation   

The Micro:bit Educational Foundation is a not-for-profit organisation founded in the UK in 2016, with the aim of inspiring every child to create their best digital future.  

 

We do this by:  

  • Developing hardware and software that inspires young people to get excited about technology and the opportunities it presents for them  
  • Creating free, user-friendly educational resources to support teachers in delivering engaging and creative lessons  
  • Working with like-minded partners to deliver high-impact educational programmes across the globe.  

 

 

About Code.org  

 

Code.org® is an education innovation nonprofit dedicated to the vision that every student in every school has the opportunity to learn computer science as part of their core K-12 education.  

 

The leading provider of K-12 computer science curriculum in the largest school districts in the United States, Code.org also organizes the annual Hour of Code campaign, which has engaged more than 15% of all students in the world.  

Education strikes: concerns grow for skills availability

Following the news that teachers will go on strike in February and March, Tania Bowers, Global Public Policy Director at the Association of Professional Staffing Companies (APSCo), comments:

 

“The general unrest we’ve seen spread across the public sector meant that this news wasn’t a surprise for many. While there will, of course, be concerns around the impact strikes will have on pupils across the country, the more pressing issue is the skills shortages that the sector has been facing.

 

“The education sector has struggled with resources for some time and the pandemic only exacerbated the issues. Professionals have faced mental health difficulties and burnout since Covid-19, juggling already significant workloads alongside the move to virtual teaching. Issues around supply teachers have only added to the problems the sector is contending with. Staff illnesses – which have become a more prevalent challenge in the post-Covid era- have put further pressures on temporary resources which were already in short supply across the education arena. This has led to an increase in staffing costs at a time when schools can ill-afford the additional expense.

 

“There needs to be a fundamental rethink around how the education sector’s staffing challenges are addressed, including more sustainable and cost-effective access to supply teachers which will only help improve the financial situation across the sector and, in turn, help solve some of the salary concerns that the TUC has raised.

 

“On a longer-term basis, though, the education arena needs a well-overdue boost of talent to help remove the work burden that is driving so many professionals to not only strike, but also exit the sector altogether.”

 

Cambridge University Press launches international celebration of teaching with fifth Dedicated Teacher Awards

Following more than two years of disruption to education caused by the pandemic, Cambridge University Press is asking people around the world to submit their stories about inspiring teachers, as the publisher opens its Cambridge Dedicated Teacher Awards for 2023.

 

The global competition provides the chance for students, parents and colleagues to say ‘thank-you’ to a special teacher, and to share examples of inspiring education across the world. Nominations are open between 16 January and 16 March 2023.

 

Now in their fifth year, the awards were established by Cambridge University Press to showcase the resourcefulness and positive impact of inspiring teachers across the globe. In 2022, the Cambridge Dedicated Teacher Awards received a staggering 7,000 nominations from 112 different countries.

 

While there are six regional winners announced every year, overall winners of the accolade have come from Pakistan, Colombia, and the United Arab Emirates. Last year’s inspirational winner, Khalifa Affnan, continues to teach at Keningau Vocational College in Malaysia.

 

Nominations can be made by going to dedicatedteacher.cambridge.org/nominate and submitting a written entry (in English) of less than 150 words or a video no longer than two minutes.

  

Publishing Director for Education at Cambridge University Press, Matthew Walker, commented: “Over the last year, we have seen students across the world return to classrooms and in-person learning. As a result, teachers have had to effectively support students at varying levels of attainment and be constantly aware of the social and academic impact of ‘lost learning’ caused by the pandemic.

 

“Teachers have never been more important, and their role in shaping young minds more vital. These awards are designed to celebrate everything they do around the world to support the next generation.”

 

Once nominations close on 16 March 2023, a panel of educational experts will choose six regional winners who have made a difference to the lives of their students. These teachers will receive a trophy and feature on a ‘thank you’ page at the front of new Cambridge University Press Education textbooks for one year from September 2023. They will also win class sets of books or digital resources.

 

The public will have the opportunity to vote for their favourite story when the regional winners are announced via social media on 24 April 2023. Cambridge University Press will announce the overall winner on 22 May 2023.   

 

The Cambridge Dedicated Teacher Awards stipulate that for an entry to be valid, nominators should only nominate one teacher. Furthermore, nominations may not be for family members, relatives or partners.  For more information, or for full terms and conditions, please go to dedicatedteacher.cambridge.org

 

Teacher Wellbeing Index 2022: record numbers plan to leave profession as mental health suffers

 

Record numbers of UK teachers and education staff have considered leaving the sector in the past academic year due to pressures on their mental health and wellbeing. Over half of this group have actively sought to change or leave their current jobs, citing workload as the main factor:

  • 59% of staff have considered leaving the sector in the past academic year due to pressures on their mental health and wellbeing (67% senior leaders, 59% schoolteachers)
  • 55% of those who have considered leaving have actively sought to change or leave their current jobs (58% senior leaders, 53% schoolteachers)
  • 68% of staff who have considered leaving cited volume of workload as the main reason for thinking about leaving their jobs (83% senior leaders, 66% schoolteachers)

 

The findings, part of the 2022 , conducted annually by the charity Education Support in conjunction with YouGov showed that overall, stress levels have increased when compared to 2021. Staff working in education also continue to experience higher levels of depression and anxiety than those reported in the general population.

  • 75% of all staff are stressed (84% of senior leaders, 72% of schoolteachers)
  • 47% of all staff always go into work when unwell (61% of senior leaders, 45% of schoolteachers)
  • 78% of all staff experienced mental health symptoms due to their work (87% senior leaders, 76% schoolteachers)

The sector has been further hit by the cost-of-living crisis with school leaders warning of “catastrophic” measures they will be forced to take this winder – including restricting heating in classrooms and cutting staff. [1] 

 

Matt Quigley, Headteacher said:

 

 “This report correlates directly with my current experience as a school leader. Stress, anxiety and depression are prevalent amongst staff; funding cuts really aren’t helping with me having to ask staff to give even more when they’re already on their knees; it is reasonable to expect that this would then negatively impact on the long-term health and well-being of staff; and, despite working really hard over the last few years – with the challenges we have all faced – in order to create a ‘compassionate culture’ amongst our staff, even for a great staff like ours we are all starting to fray at the edges. This way of working simply isn’t sustainable for much longer and some wide-ranging changes need to be made.”

 

 Commenting on this year’s Index, Sinéad Mc Brearty, CEO of Education Support said:

 

“These findings paint a grave picture for the future of education. The Prime Minister has made clear his commitment to growth and the skills agenda, but the reality of the education workforce crisis will not magic itself away. No-one has sought to create this situation, but these chronic, entrenched dynamics around workload, stress and mental ill health will limit our national ambition for a generation. We are witnessing the slow disintegration of the workforce.”  

“Whilst these data make difficult reading for everyone involved in trying to make the system the best it can be, the simple fact is that we are failing.  Our children and young people deserve so much more from us. It is time to invest in the workforce and to remove the well documented drivers of significant stress in the system.”

To download a full copy of the report, including conclusions and recommendations visit Education Support’s website.

Bournemouth Pupils Use Technology To Unite for Anti-Bullying Week

 

Bournemouth school children have been celebrating Anti-Bullying Week by using the latest in educational technology to learn about friendships, kindness and how to stay safe online. 

 

Pupils from Kingsleigh Primary School took part in a week of special activities to mark the event, which included using digital resources from Discovery Education Espresso . Taking place in November each year, Anti-Bullying Week is a nationwide campaign to raise awareness of different kinds of bullying and empower children to take a stand and make a difference.

 

Kingsleigh Primary School pupils began their learning by coming together for ‘circle time’, where they used digital resources to investigate what bullying looks like and how it can be prevented. The children discussed what it means to be a good friend and explored how to take a stand against unkind behaviour. 

 

Next, the pupils took part in a whole-school assembly, where they watched a Discovery Education video about the importance of respect and kindness. Produced in partnership with the Anti Bullying Alliance, ‘One Kind Word’ gave the children lots of ideas for ‘random acts of kindness’, which can break down barriers and brighten the lives of those around them. 

 

Teacher Janet Beauchamp said:

“It was wonderful to see the children work together to take a stand against bullying. Discovery Education’s anti-bullying resources gave us lots of different scenarios to explore and prompted valuable discussion points.  Although the children were already fairly knowledgeable about the different types of bullying, it was a good refresher of how we can beat bullying with kindness.”

 

Discovery Education Espresso offers a vast array of anti-bullying and online-safety resources, spanning all primary key stages and subjects and including video, text, audio, images and interactive activities.  

 

Explore Discovery Education’s award-winning, curriculum-matched digital resources at www.discoveryeducation.co.uk.

 

KnowBe4 Launches New Mobile Learner App for Anytime, Anywhere Cybersecurity Learning

 

KnowBe4 empowers end users by introducing security awareness and compliance training on the go at no additional cost 

London, UK (November 28, 2022) – KnowBe4, the provider of the world’s largest security awareness training and simulated phishing platform, today announced it is launching the new KnowBe4 Mobile Learner App to empower end users by introducing security awareness and compliance training on the go at no additional cost to customers, improving user engagement and strengthening security culture. 

With a large majority of the world’s population using smartphones today, mobile training revolutionises the way people learn. This new app will enable end users to complete their security awareness and compliance training conveniently from their tablets or smartphones, giving them 24/7/365 access. 

“The KnowBe4 Mobile Learner App is the first of its kind to launch in the security awareness and compliance training space, making it easier than ever to train users while subsequently strengthening an organisation’s security culture,” said Stu Sjouwerman, CEO, KnowBe4. “This new app will enable IT and security teams to improve engagement and completion rates for required training thanks to a seamless user experience. This will also help users to associate security with their personal devices, keeping it top of mind all the time rather than only when they are at work on their computers. We are making this substantial new capability available at no additional cost to all subscription levels as a show of our commitment to supporting our customers’ security and human risk management objectives.” 

Based on subscription levels, KnowBe4 offers 100+ Mobile-First training modules that were designed specifically for mobile. The KnowBe4 Learner App supports push notifications for custom announcements, updates on assigned training as well as KnowBe4 newsletters. 

The app is available for iOS and Android, and free to all KnowBe4 customers with a KnowBe4 training platform subscription. For more information, visit https://www.knowbe4.com/mobile-learner-app.  

About KnowBe4 

KnowBe4, the provider of the world’s largest security awareness training and simulated phishing platform, is used by more than 54,000 organisations around the globe. Founded by IT and data security specialist Stu Sjouwerman, KnowBe4 helps organisations address the human element of security by raising awareness about ransomware, CEO fraud and other social engineering tactics through a new-school approach to awareness training on security. Kevin Mitnick, an internationally recognised cybersecurity specialist and KnowBe4’s Chief Hacking Officer, helped design the KnowBe4 training based on his well-documented social engineering tactics. Tens of thousands of organisations rely on KnowBe4 to mobilise their end users as their last line of defence. 

National Institute of Teaching publishes first phase of inaugural research on mentoring for teachers

The National Institute of Teaching (NIoT) has published the first phase of its inaugural research project, ‘Mentoring and coaching trainee and early career teachers: conceptual review and current practice survey’. The aim of the research function of NIoT is to find workable and evidence-based solutions for the most urgent and complex teacher professional development challenges faced by schools everywhere.

 

The mentoring project draws on a diversity of perspectives and reference points from across the teacher development and wider education sectors*, bringing together a wide range of experts, organisations, skills and expertise. This first phase clarifies definitions and approaches – and explains the theories behind how schools-based mentoring can achieve a range of positive outcomes.

 

To inform the project’s recommendations to the sector, this phase also includes findings from a Teacher Tapp survey of around 300 mentees in their first five years of teaching and more than 1,000 mentors**, including:

 

  • Mentees in the sample were generally positive about being mentored: 87 per cent named at least one benefit, particularly greater confidence and improved teaching practices.
  • Whilst almost all mentors report experiencing some benefits, most also named some detrimental effects, and these frequently relate to lack of time and mentoring detracting from other activities.
  • A third of primary teachers in the sample did not feel that they had been given an appropriate mentor – twice the proportion of secondary teachers, who will typically work in schools with larger staff teams.
  • The benefits and challenges of mentorship reported by mentees did not differ substantially between those who were mentored by their line manager and those who had a separate line manager and mentor. However, more than half of all teachers surveyed said they would prefer not to be mentored by their line manager.

 

This work will help inform the final stage of this project, the publication in Spring 2023 of recommendations on effective practice for mentoring in primary and secondary education. Recommendations will also be informed by a review of the evidence. We will bridge gaps in evidence with practical, transparent and actionable recommendations that can benefit the whole school system, including other teacher-development providers, as well as NIoT’s own programmes. 

 

Executive Director of Research and Best Practice, Calum Davey, said: “Achieving our mission to improve the quality of teaching across the country means conducting rigorous research on areas of professional development that are challenging for schools to implement.”

 

“We chose teacher mentoring as our first research project because mentoring is a fundamental element of trainee and early career teacher training and, when done well, is a powerful way to support, develop and retain effective teachers. Issues such as capacity and expertise persist, which mean that schools can struggle to identify appropriate mentors and to provide them with sufficient time and support. 

 

“Schools, training providers and policy makers can benefit from guidance on where to focus effort and resource. Working closely with our research partners across the sector, the next phase of this project will analyse the evidence and findings to produce evidence-based recommendations.  These will inform our own training programmes and, crucially, be proactively shared with everyone in education for the purpose of benefiting teachers and pupils everywhere.”

 

To read the full conceptual review and research findings, go to niot.org.uk/teacher-mentoring-research.

 

* The core project team consists of education and research experts including teachers, leaders and academics.

 

The expert panel has senior-level practitioner, academic and provider representation from seven leading teacher training universities, providers and academies. 

 

** This data was collected via the Teacher Tapp survey app in early July 2022 in order to give an overview of current mentoring practice in state-funded schools in England for teachers with fewer than five years’ experience.  

Esri UK provides mapping expertise for Department for Education’s major new climate project

Nature Park project will map grounds of every school, creating one vast nature park roughly twice the size of Birmingham

 

The Department for Education (DfE) has released further details of its National Education Nature Park, created to teach children of all ages about climate change and improve biodiversity across the country. Esri UK is providing a digital mapping platform and expertise in biodiversity mapping to help underpin this exciting initiative, first announced at COP26 by the Education Secretary. 

 

The National Education Nature Park will engage young people and teachers with nature, supporting them to play a driving role in mapping and monitoring biodiversity on their grounds using citizen science and, critically, taking action to enhance it. The DfE believe this could play an important part in increasing biodiversity across the education estate and have a real impact on halting the decline of nature in England.

 

The Nature Park project will map, manage and enhance the grounds in every school, college or nursery in the country, creating one, vast nature park roughly twice the size of Birmingham. Students will have the opportunity to transform their green spaces into their own Nature Park and play leadership roles in studying, managing and enhancing biodiversity and climate resilience.

 

To deliver the project, DfE has created a partnership led by the Natural History Museum working with Esri UK, the Royal Horticultural Society, the Royal Society, Royal Geographical Society, Learning through Landscapes, Manchester Metropolitan University and other supporting partners. 

 

The partnership will be working with Esri UK to devise digital tools for use by children and young people, such as mobile apps, enabling them to map the biodiversity of their school grounds and its improvement over time. 

 

“We are delighted to be working with the Department for Education and partners on the National Education Nature Park initiative,” said Stuart Bonthrone, Managing Director of Esri UK. “Biodiversity and environmental sustainability are at the heart of much of the work that Esri UK and our customers are involved in globally and we have a long-standing commitment to Education, providing our software free to schools in the UK and around the world. We are therefore particularly proud to be part of this initiative which closely reflects the core nature and values of our business.”

 

In addition to improving biodiversity across the country and engaging young people in nature, the application of biodiversity mapping will help children and young people develop competences in mapping, numeracy and spatial awareness. The Nature Park will therefore help pupils and students to develop skills in data visualisation and analysis, encouraging analytical thinking and problem solving.

 

The project is a perfect fit for Esri UK. For over 50 years, Esri has been committed to the conservation of the planet, developing geospatial solutions that help to protect it. In the UK Education sector, over 3,000 schools currently use its Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software as part of the Esri UK Education programme, which provides free access to its software, teaching resources and teacher training.

 

The partnership will be creating a wealth of curated and quality assured information and teaching resources easily accessible to teachers to support them in delivering climate education across the curriculum. A new climate action award scheme will also recognise the work being undertaken in all education settings to protect green spaces and promote biodiversity.

 

To find out more about the National Education Nature Park, schools and students can read the Department for Education’s blog and register for updates on the Natural History Museum’s website.

THE DYING ART OF LETTER WRITING: 1 IN 3 CHILDREN IN THE UK HAVE NEVER SENT OR RECEIVED A LETTER

Research from Nationwide Building Society and The Diana Award has revealed that a third of children (32%) have never written a letter, with a similar amount (35%) having never received one either. However, the same survey concluded that 4 in 5 (84%) children of all ages would be excited to receive a letter in the post! This includes older children (75% of 15-year-olds) as well as younger children (93% of 7-year-olds)! 

 

Nationwide and The Diana Award, with the help of a number of familiar faces like Will Poulter, Molly Rainford, Steph Houghton and many more, want to change this shocking statistic by launching The Positive Post Box campaign. Not only is the campaign an attempt to bring back the joys of letter writing and tap into children’s excitement for the dying art, it also has an underlying motive to tackle bullying in schools through spreading positivity and mutual respect. 

 

As the campaign kicks off, over 120,000 children from 300 schools have received their very own Positive Post Box and are about to take part in one of the biggest pen pal schemes the UK has ever seen! 

 

Research by Nationwide Building Society has showed the devastating impact bullying can have on young people with a number of shocking statistics coming to light. 

 

  • 8 in 10 (83%) children have experienced bullying, with the vast majority (84%) stating that the bullying took place within the school grounds. 
  • Half of the children surveyed (50%) said the reason for the bullying was because of their appearance
  • Over a third (36%) stating it was due to social factors
  • A quarter (25%) of the children surveyed stating the bullying took place online

 

The data shows that school children are acutely aware of the scale of bullying in the UK as well, three quarters (75%) were aware that their friend(s) had been bullied.  

 

It’s not just children that feel the impact of bullying as well. 

 

  • Almost 7 in 10 (68%) parents surveyed said bullying at school has negatively impacted their mental health
  • The statistics show that bullying in school can have long-term effects: parents reported a negative impact on confidence levels in both social situations (71%) and at work (54%)
  • Nearly 7 in 10 (67%) parents surveyed said they still hold insecurities in adult life about what they were bullied about in school, mainly relating to appearance (69%). This is particularly so with females, with three quarters (75%) of female parents surveyed said they still hold on to appearance / weight related insecurities, whilst just under 2 in 5 (39%) male parents surveyed said the same. 
  • Over half (55%) of parents surveyed, who are nervous about their child being bullied because they know what an impact it can have on their whole life.

 

The research is difficult to read but highlights just how important campaigns like this are to tackle bullying as early as possible. The aim for the campaign is to do it in a positive way, focusing on positive behaviour, words of affirmation and encouraging actions. During The Positive Post Box campaign hundreds of thousands of letters filled with kind messages will be delivered to children around the UK helping to raise awareness and make a major impact on children’s mental health. 

 

CBBC star and Positive Post Box Ambassador, Molly Rainford, spoke about the campaign:  

 

“I’m delighted to take part in a campaign like this and I wish when I was in school there was a project like this to spread positivity. Getting the chance to write my own letter was really rewarding, it’s been years since I wrote a letter but I will be definitely picking up a pen more often and getting creative. I think it’s really important that these campaigns exist to encourage children to speak up, write down their feelings and also show their creativity. I hope the Positive Post Box is going to help loads of children across the country.”  

 

Rhys Stephenson, presenter and The Diana Award ambassador spoke about the campaign:  

 

“I’m so proud to be taking part in such a positive project. As somebody who has spoken publicly about bullying before, I will also support initiatives that spread positivity and respect. I can’t wait to see all of the children reading and writing their letters.”  

 

Director of Advertising & Marketing at Nationwide Building Society, Paul Hibbs commented:  

 

“Working with The Diana Award to promote mutual respect to tackle bullying head on by spreading messages of hope and positivity is an honour. 

 

“The on-bullying stats are pretty scary, so anything we can do to combat the root of the problem is vital, and that’s what we hope to do with this partnership. We want to show children who may be suffering they’re not alone, too. At Nationwide, mutual respect has always been a core value to us, so we are incredibly proud to be able to drive such a positive message and promote equality, respect and inclusivity in society.” 

 

Deputy CEO of The Diana Awards, Alex Holmes added: “On the back of our annual Big Anti-Bullying Assembly with Nationwide Building Society we’re delighted to be part of this brand-new campaign which encourages kindness through the revival of letter writing. We’ve received an overwhelming response from the launch with over 120,000 children set to be involved across the whole of the UK. 

 

“Simple written messages of kindness can have a positive impact on both the sender and receiver. At The Diana Award we’re passionate about tackling bullying behaviour by empowering young people to make change. We’re looking forward to seeing young people across the county putting pen to paper and sending their messages when the post boxes start to be delivered on October 31st.” 

 

Alongside this campaign, Nationwide Building Society is working with The Diana Award to train an extra 10,000 Anti-Bullying Ambassadors in over 660 primary schools across the UK over the next three years. Through this initiative, school children can develop key skills around tackling bullying, celebrating difference and supporting their peers, online and offline.  

 

The find out more about the initiative and download your very own digital pack here: https://www.antibullyingpro.com/take-action/positive-post-box