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New tech solution to create better learning environment for young people

  • Nuance Hearing, a leading provider of focused listening technology, has created the Voice Selector Study, a new technological solution to help young people concentrate in noisy and distraction-filled classroom environments.
  • Developed by a team of technology and health experts, the device utilises Nuance’s world-leading advancements in tech to support focused listening.
  • The Voice Selector Study aids attention and focus in the classroom by cutting through background noise, honing in on the speaker and tuning out everything else. 
  • Aimed at any pupil who is struggling to concentrate in learning environments, the device is also useful for those with ADHD and other sensory and auditory processing difficulties.
  • Clinical study showed significant improvement in the ability to listen to the teacher in a noisy classroom.

 

 Nuance Hearing, a leading provider of focused listening technology, has launched the Voice Selector Study, a new technological solution to help young people concentrate in noisy and distraction-filled classroom environments. 

 

The device creates a better learning environment for young people, helping them to listen to the teacher and follow instructions, while tuning out other distractions. A clinical study* which tested the efficacy of the Voice Selector Study in classroom settings for 31 adolescents with ADHD showed highly significant improvements in the ability to focus on and listen to the teacher and in the ability to ignore distractions in the classroom.

 

Eight built-in microphones automatically track the teacher’s (or the dominant speaker’s) voice as they move around the classroom, reducing the level of background noise and enabling the user to focus with less cognitive effort. 

 

Nuance Hearing’s cutting-edge beamforming technology gives a world leading signal-to-noise ratio of 15db, (the relative reduction of overall noise in relation to the target sound), which compares to an industry-standard in real-time applications of 4-5dB.

 

The Voice Selector Study is an easy to use, small tabletop device that works with any wired headphones. In addition to automatically tracking the dominant speaker, the user can also manually select up to two dominant speakers to track.

 

Aimed at any pupil who is struggling to concentrate in learning environments, the device can also be particularly useful for those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), auditory processing difficulties (APD) or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), who tend to struggle more with concentration in classroom settings. ADHD is estimated to affect about 2-5% (around 1 in 30) studentsat school. APD is estimated 0.5-1% of school aged children. 

 

A clinical study which tested the efficacy of the Voice Selector Study in classroom settings for 31 adolescents with ADHD showed highly significant improvements in the ability to focus on and listen to the teacher and in the ability to ignore distractions in the classroom. 

Tami Harel, Director of Clinical Research at Nuance Hearing, said: “Classrooms nowadays can be very noisy and full of distractions. It is difficult for everyone to tune in on the teacher in a noisy environment, but for some children this task is even harder. Some children struggle to concentrate and focus on the teacher, and this effort affects their ability to learn and participate in the classroom. We’re proud to launch the Voice Selector Study to help children ignore the unwanted noise and distractions and focus on the teacher. We believe this can facilitate learning and empower students.”

 

According to the ADHD Foundation, the ‘core symptoms’ of ADHD are usually present before the student is 12 years of age and can persist throughout their school life. ADHD students typically have a short attention span and so can find it hard to concentrate and learn, especially in group situations. This can impact on their education and many of these students underachieve at school. Among children aged 6–16, there is a clear association between ADHD symptoms and academic attainment. Furthermore, recent research has found that medication alone does not help children with ADHD to learn.

 

The Voice Selector Study is available to purchase from www.nuancehear.com.

 

Campus Crime: London School of Economics reports over £250k of thefts

 

Laptops, mobile phones, and Rolex watches reported as lost or stolen by students and staff

 

London, 8th June 2022 The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), a leading research institution, has recorded nearly £250,000 in stolen electronic devices, including laptops, tablets and phones, over the past five years according to official figures.

 

The data which was retrieved via the Freedom of Information Act (FOI) and analysed by the Parliament Street think tank, observed the number of stolen electronic devices from LSE year on year from 2017 to 2022, as well as the total cost of devices lost.

 

In total, £242,744 worth of devices were listed as stolen, with laptops, tablets and phones accounting for 78 per cent of the devices.

 

Overall, the 208 stolen laptops, tablets and phones totalled £189,934 worth of lost devices, with 126 laptops, 61 phones and 21 tablets reported as stolen.

 

The year with the greatest monetary loss was 2017, with 54 stolen devices totalling £50,740 whilst 2019’s 57 stolen devices was the highest volume of devices during the reporting period.

 

Outside of laptops, tablets and phones, a further £52,810 in devices including network switches, cameras and a Rolex watch were reported stolen.

 

The news comes following the government’s Cyber Security Breaches Survey, revealing that an alarming 92 per cent of universities have been targeted a cyber-attack in the past 12 months.

 

Cyber crime expert Achi Lewis, Area VP EMEA for Absolute Software, commented: “Large organisations naturally have a greater task of ensuring that devices are fully protected, and the vast number of interactions that happen at universities like LSE can increase the chances of devices being stolen or misplaced. As such, it is essential that cybersecurity measures are put in place, such as resilient zero trust solutions to restrict the access of malicious actors trying to breach stolen devices.

 

“Particularly in industries like the education sector, it is essential that staff, and even students, are properly trained on the key security issues at hand given the volume of sensitive data stored across devices. Effective training will not only aid the prevention of breaches, but also assist staff and students on how to react once a device has been stolen.”

 

Online Parent-Teacher Conferences should be encouraged

Once or twice a year, parents pay a visit to the school to meet with teachers and discuss about their children. Whether it’s about the academic progress their kids have made, or how they are doing in general within the school environment, the annual parent-teacher conference is a vital component within the education systems from all over the world.

So, what happened when the COVID-19 was declared a global pandemic? Well, naturally when the schools closed down, parent-teacher conferences were also cancelled indefinitely. But now that the schools are largely back to normal, it is time again for teachers and parents to come together and work towards creating an even better learning experience for the children. Many schools have shifted towards hybrid education, combining and alternating between in-person and remote learning. Consequently, there is also a growing trend of school administrators hosting both virtual and physical meetings for parent-teacher conferences.

According to Rene Buhay, SVP of Sales and Marketing at AVer Europe, “By utilising the latest education technology such as video conferencing, online parent-teacher conferences can be a powerful and effective way in building meaningful relationships between the families and educators. Contrary to what some may believe, having parent-teacher conferences online are not inferior to in-person meetings. In fact, these virtual conferences can bring many advantageous factors in areas where face-to-face meetings may be limited.”

 Here are some key reasons why online parent-teacher conferences should be encouraged.

Flexible and Accessible

In a time of uncertainty where the world is trying to establish new “norms”, flexibility is crucial in ensuring a level playing field for all children. The traditional parent-teacher conference often did not have a concrete schedule that the parents could follow. Instead, there would be some general timetable for when each teacher is available to talk, but often parents would end up waiting in line for prolonged periods before they got their turn. It’s also not surprising that sometimes parents can’t make it to the conference due to work shift hours, prior commitment, or long-distance commute. With the option of having the parent-teacher conferences online, it eliminates these problems and increases the chance of both parents being able to attend. An internet connection, a video conferencing camera, and open platform such as Zoom, TEAMS or SKYPE,  is all a parent needs to join a virtual conference. Parents can now communicate with teachers from the comfort of their home, or virtually anywhere through the tap of a few buttons.

Efficient and Easy

While parents can enjoy the flexibility and accessibility of attending virtually, teachers also benefit from these online conferences. No longer do teachers have to struggle with presenting students’ work to parents in a noisy gym filled with overlapping conversations, nor will they be restricted to stay at a designated table due to limited space. By implementing educational technology in online conferences, teachers can stream and show all the work a student has done through a visualiser that’s equipped with a rotatable camera head, giving them the option to show their face and the student’s work interchangeably. Alternatively, if the teacher also likes to move around the room and gesture to points written on a blackboard, a simple tracking camera with plug-and-play USB connectivity would allow them to do so in seconds. With the utilisation of these two, we can say goodbye to distracting noises and poor visibility in a room full of waiting parents.

Build an Engaged Community

Choosing to participate in online parent-teacher conferences is essentially taking a more digital approach. With technology weaving its way more into the field of education, the level of convenience and visibility it brings can encourage parents to attend online conferences more often and in turn allow both parties the opportunity to get consistent insights and communication from each other. In doing so, this will create a sense of community that is connected based on collaboration for the sake of the children’s growth and development.

About AVer Europe

AVer Europe provides intelligent technological solutions which harness the power of visual communications for business and education. With over 20 years of research, development and manufacturing excellence AVer holds numerous international design, innovation, application, and service awards for exceptional product usability, reliability and customer satisfaction.

http://www.avereurope.com

UK digital literacy to receive major boost as 57k BBC micro:bit coding devices donated to primary schools

  • The Micro:bit Educational Foundation alongside partners Nominet and the Scottish government will donate 57,000 BBC micro:bits across UK primary schools   
  • Support from the Scottish government will see every primary school in Scotland receives devices  
  • In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, priority will be given to the schools that need additional support the most  
  • With many secondary schools now using BBC micro:bits in the classroom, the project aims to boost support for younger children and provide essential teacher resources   

    30 March 2022 The Micro:bit Educational Foundation, the organisation behind the pocket-sized BBC micro:bit computer, has announced plans to help even more primary school children take their first steps into digital creativity and computing. In partnership with Nominet and the Scottish government, 57,000 BBC micro:bit devices will be donated to UK primary schools, alongside comprehensive teaching resources and online Continuing Professional Development courses.   

    As digital literacy and computing become increasingly important core skills, this major boost to teaching these subjects will see approximately 3,000 UK primary schools receive around 20 devices each. Support from the Scottish government will see every primary school in Scotland receive 20 devices, with the Foundation and Nominet working with primary schools in England, Wales and Northern Ireland to prioritise 22,000 devices to those that need additional support the most. Delivery of devices will begin from April onwards.  

    Having launched in 2016, today there are 6 million BBC micro:bits being used by children all over the world, including most UK secondary schools. The Foundation has also seen growing adoption and demand from primary schools to teach 8 – 11-year-olds with the devices. With this major project, the Micro:bit Educational Foundation aims to boost usage in primary schools even further, providing the devices and resources to help teachers make coding exciting, accessible, and something they can teach confidently to younger children.   

Teaching digital skills from a young age has impressive results and understanding computational thinking can greatly enhance a child’s creativity and life chances. However, research underpinning the project from the Micro:bit Educational Foundation and Nominet found that  61% of UK primary teachers responsible for teaching computing have no background in the subject, 3 in 5 also cite lack of resources as a barrier to teaching computing and digital skills.   

Gareth Stockdale, CEO of the Micro:bit Educational Foundation, said: “Digital literacy and computational thinking are critically important not only to the future of our society, but to the future of children who will one day shape that society. They are increasingly important core skills, and we know that the earlier you learn them, the better. The BBC micro:bit has become an essential tool that teachers and students alike have come to love. We’ve seen fantastic adoption in secondary schools, and we’re delighted to support and empower even more teachers to unlock children’s creative potential at primary level.”  

Roll-out of the micro:bits will also complement a three-phase research programme, as the Foundation looks to assess, monitor and address the challenges, concerns and successes UK primary teachers experience improving digital literacy and in bringing micro:bits into the classroom.  

Interested teachers and schools can visit the Micro:bit Educational Foundation website for more information.  

Adam Leach, CIO, Nominet, said: “We are so pleased to see the continued roll-out of micro-bit in classrooms across the UK, enabling so many more primary school children to explore and develop their skills in digital creativity and computing. It’s exciting to think about the potential passion for technology this programme could set alight. On practical level, it is really important that access to learning these essential skills is provided to children who might not otherwise have the opportunity to discover, experiment and master them. Each one of the 57,000 devices will impact on developing children’s core digital skills as citizens of a digitalised world – and perhaps even put some of them on a pathway to help fill the digital skills gap in the UK’s digital workforce of the future.”    

 

New resources launched for schools to help make sure school uniform is affordable

The Children’s Society is launching new resources today for all state primary and secondary schools to help them navigate the changes set by new school uniform laws. These resources were developed in partnership with the Child Poverty Action Group and Children North East, and based on years of hands-on work with schools and families. 
 
The new law, the Education (Guidance about Costs of School Uniforms) Act 2021 which passed in April 2021, requires schools to follow new statutory guidance on uniform costs, instructing them on how they must keep prices down so their policies are more inclusive for children from low-income families.   
 
Schools are required to implement the guidance in time for parents buying uniform for the new school year in Autumn 2022 – or Summer 2023 if it breaches a pre-existing contract or formal agreement with a supplier. The new resources have been designed to help schools understand the guidance and be able to implement the changes to their policies.   
 
The new cost of school uniform law was a result of seven years of campaigning from The Children’s Society to make school uniform affordable and a Private Members Bill from Mike Amesbury MP. Young people had told The Children’s Society back in 2014 how not being able to afford the correct uniform meant they were given detentions or even being excluded. It also made them feel embarrassed amongst their peers and resulted in being bullied or feeling isolated.   
 
The charity went on to publish three research reports The Wrong Blazer in 2015, 2018 and 2020 revealing that many schools have unnecessarily strict uniform requirements, such as making families buy uniform at specific and often expensive shops or having lots of branded items. This meant that for families living on the breadline, it was the choice between letting their child turn up with incorrect uniform and facing the consequences or going without the basics.   
 
Mark Russell, Chief Executive of The Children’s Society, said: “School should be a place where every child feels they belong. A uniform can bring the school community together and develop a sense of school identity but high standards shouldn’t have to mean high costs. Long uniform lists put pressure on family finances and expensive uniforms can even push parents into debt or force them to make hard choices to ensure their children have the right kit.  

“Our research in 2020 found that 1 in 8 families were having to cut back on essentials, such as food or heating to cover the cost. The stress of having the wrong uniform, and fear of being singled out, has a real impact on pupils’ confidence and well-being. They may even be taken out of lessons because of incorrect uniform, losing essential learning time. 

“We have designed these resources to help schools understand and be able to navigate the new statutory guidance in front of them. We invite all schools to download our resources so they find it easier to update their school uniform policies making them more affordable by the start of the next school year.” 

Head of Child Poverty Action Group’s Cost of the School Day programme Kate Anstey said:  

“We know that parents struggle with the cost of school uniform and that kids are excluded from activities and even given detentions for not having the right kit. Following the new government guidance, we’ve brought together our insights in this series of resources to support schools to develop affordable approaches to uniform and ensure children are not priced out of school life.”   

 
Luke Bramhall, Head of Youth Services and Poverty Proofing at Children North East, said: 

“At Children North East we frequently hear directly from children and their families about the impact uniform costs have on household income through our Poverty Proofing© the School Day work. The recent government guidance is an important step in the right direction, enabling educators to create accessible uniform that will reduce costs and remove stigma associated with not being able to afford expensive uniform costs. We are pleased to have worked with both organisations to produce this series of resources aimed at supporting schools to implement affordable uniform policies.” 

 

 The Resources can be downloaded for free from http://childrenssociety.org.uk/school-uniform-resources 

‘Going Too Far–Extremism and the Law’- LGfL wins award for resource developed in partnership with DfE… and its Technical or IT Support Services

LGfL-The National Grid for Learning strikes gold with a double award win at BETT 20221

LGfL-The National Grid for Learning celebrated striking gold at this year’s BETT Awards 2022, when it scooped  both the Best Wellbeing, Digital Wellness & Safeguarding Resource for its ‘Going too Far–The Law and Extremism’, developed in partnership with the Department for Education, and the Best Technical or IT Support Services. The BETT Awards, organised in association with the British Education Suppliers Association (BESA), celebrate the inspiring creativity and innovation that can be found throughout technology for education. The awards form an integral part of BETT each year, the world’s leading showcase of education technology solutions.

John Jackson, CEO, LGfL-The National Grid for Learning said, “We are absolutely thrilled to win these two awards – my thanks goes out to our talented online safeguarding team and colleagues from the Department for Education for producing Going too Far, designed to  promote critical thinking online and equip teachers with scenario-based activities to lead discussions around extremism and behaviours that are dangerous or illegal. I would also like to thank our dedicated team for rolling out significant technology initiatives to ensure that no child is left behind and for delivering exceptional customer care. (Please click on the video and move to 1.10 to see LGfL featured on the BETT Awards site  https://bettawards.com/)

Going Too Far? – Extremism and the Law

Going Too Far?-Extremism and the Law (https://goingtoofar.lgfl.net) –  the result of a partnership between the Department for Education and LGfL – is an open-access interactive teaching resource to help students understand extremism and how certain online behaviours may be illegal or dangerous. Cross-curricular activities facilitate a whole-school approach, complementing and complying with RSHE guidance, Keeping Children Safe in Education and the UKCIS Education for a Connected World Framework.

The resource aims to promote critical thinking and build resilience to help young people face the abundance of extremist content online by exploring the techniques used by extremists and evaluating digital content, making positive choices about who/what is trustworthy online,  challenging extremist narratives and considering the consequences of their actions and making a positive stand.

Going too Far includes case studies and discussion stimuli, videos featuring subject experts,  scenarios to explore potential risks e.g. gaming and social media, signposting to trusted sources for support and reporting channels and printable teacher notes, extension activities, mini video guides and suggested answers to help lead informative discussions.

Its SEND and Inclusion area features audio narrations and alternative texts, as well as differentiated questions to support as wide a range of learners as possible.

Best Technical or IT Support Services

LGfL is one of the fastest growing edtech charities in the UK.  Its mission is the advancement of education. It is passionate about tackling inequality, promoting diversity and ensuring no child is left behind. Its #BridgeTheDivide initiative –  a huge national procurement for up to 2 million Chromebooks and Windows Laptops – enabled it to drive down the cost, save schools millions of pounds and increase access to devices and technology for children, including those disadvantaged. By making its Free School Meals Eligibility Checker free to schools nationwide it was able to help them to identify a potential £112.5M of Pupil Premium Funding and to support communities facing huge challenges.

“Our empathy and understanding of schools’ needs has enabled us to design, build and provide solutions that have been consumed at an unprecedented scale,” said John Jackson.

“Our standards of customer care are exceptional, with a retention rate of over 90%, sometimes involving incredible risk on behalf of our customers.”

  1. LGfL-The National Grid for Learning strikes gold with a double award win at BETT 2022 – Right to Left: Sindu Vee, Event Host and award winning comedian; Mubina Asaria – Online Safeguarding Consultant, LGfL; Bob Usher – Content Manager; LGfL; John Jackson – CEO; LGfL; Gareth Jelley – Product and Security Manager, LGfL.

Acer is Back at BETT Live show and will be showcasing the latest Chromebooks and Windows 11 TravelMates for Education

After 2 years away, Acer is back at this year’s live BETT show with the latest innovations and technology, showcasing new devices as part of the Acer for Education pledge to ‘Inspire Daily, Learn Always’.

  • Join Google | Acer @ stand SC42 – This stand will focus on the Chrome environment and be a place where you can see demos of the new eco-friendly Acer Chromebooks. To see all the latest Acer education products visit the Acer Partners stands and for each demonstration, Acer will plant 100 trees via Ecologi. Partner stands are Misco @ SA51, EE @ SN53 and Stone @ SG31
  • Visit Acer @ the Microsoft Theater March 24 at 3.30pm for an Acer Keynote speech and Danesfield school’s first-hand experience on Windows11SE
  • Learn more about Acer & Planet9 @ Esports Arena on March 23 – 25 Experience our Esports devices and PLANET9 or March 24 At 1.30-2pm: Acer keynote speech and At 3-5pm: AcerEsports school tournament.

 

London, UK (March 17, 2022) Acer are excited to announce the return to BETT live at the Excel in London after a 2-year break away due to the pandemic. Acer’s goal is to bring innovative technologies to schools and help educators create better learning environments so that students can develop the skills they need for the future through the Acer Stem Rewards and the BETT show is the perfect opportunity to showcase the extensive Acer STEM reward program which offers a wide range of benefits to educators.

As part of the Acer Stem Rewards, schools who purchase Acer classroom devices can claim rewards up to the value of £1000, in the form of cashback or training support.

For a full overview of the Acer Stem Rewards that are available visit the Bett Show and speak to one of the Acer representatives on the Acer Stand (Bett Hall SC42).

Some of the new devices available to purchase using the Acer Stem Rewards will be demonstrated at the show including the four new Acer Chromebooks that come with an array of durability and eco-friendly features, including MIL-STD 810H rating, mechanically-anchored keyboards, OceanGlass™ touchpads and use of post-consumer recycled plastics.

“The popularity of Chromebooks continues to grow thanks to the robust features in the Chrome Education Upgrade combined with advances in Chromebook design, features and technology,” said James Lin, General Manager, Notebooks, IT Products Business, Acer Inc. “These new Acer Chromebooks deliver the foundational technology that help students strive for success at school, while also ensuring teachers and administrators have a powerful device for class preparation and IT management.”

Chrome Education Upgrade, Zero-Touch Enrollment Maximize Learning

With Chrome Education upgrade, teachers and administrators can leverage the full capabilities of the Chromebook and Chrome OS to ensure students can focus on learning with a robust, secure device. In addition, IT departments can easily manage them with Zero-touch enrollment — to drop ship new Acer Chromebooks to their school sites that will automatically enrol as soon as the end-user connects to the internet.

Durable Design

All of the four new Chromebooks were built to withstand the challenges of a busy school environment, featuring impact-resistant chassis that meets MIL-STD 810H[[1]] standards. A shock-absorbent bumper and reinforced design protects them from drops as high 122 cm (48 ft) and withstands up to 60 kg (132.3 lbs) of pressure. The Chromebooks’ displays can also be opened a full 180 degrees, helping protect the devices when the screen is being handled, and a unique drainage system built into their keyboards helps protect internal components from accidental water spills[[2]].

The Acer Chromebook Spin 311, Acer Chromebook 512 and Acer Chromebook 511 also have mechanically anchored keys that are difficult for inquisitive students to remove, but at the same time, simple for IT personnel to repair or replace. Widened brackets and reinforced I/O ports further protect them from the wear and tear of frequent use.

Eco-Friendly Features Include OceanGlass Touchpad

A testament to Acer’s commitment to sustainability, all four of the new Chromebooks feature a unique environmentally friendly OceanGlass touchpad made entirely of abandoned ocean-bound plastic waste. Not only does the use of this waste contribute to the reduction of plastics adrift in the ocean, it also gives the touchpad a glass-like texture and responsive tactile feedback.

Additionally, three of the Chromebooks—the Acer Chromebook Spin 311, Acer Chromebook 512 and Acer Chromebook 511—integrate post-consumer recycled plastics into their chassis design to further exemplify Acer’s commitment to sustainability.

Pricing and Availability

The Acer Chromebook 512 (C852) will be available in North America in January starting at USD 349.99; and in EMEA in Q1 starting at EUR 359 and the UK for £329.

The Acer Chromebook 511 (C734/T) will be available in North America in February starting at USD 349.99; and in EMEA in February starting at EUR 329 and the UK for £299.

The Acer Chromebook 314 (C934/T) will be available in North America in 2H’22 starting at USD 429.99; and in EMEA in April starting at EUR 369 and the UK for £329.

The Acer Chromebook Spin 311 (R722T) will be available in North America in March starting at USD 399.99; and in EMEA in Q1’22 starting at EUR 339 and the UK for £299.

Exact specifications, prices, and availability will vary by region. To learn more about availability, product specifications and prices in specific markets, please contact your nearest Acer office via www.acer.com.

FOUR IN TEN TEACHERS PLAN TO CUT THEIR TEACHING HOURS IN NEXT TWO YEARS

  • Four in ten (38%) teachers plan on changing their working hours in the next two years – with one in 12 (8%) leaving teaching entirely
  • Almost a third (29%) of women teachers said they planned to step back from the classroom

 

Four in ten teachers (38%) plan to change their working hours in the next two years, according to new research by specialist financial services mutual Wesleyan.

After a challenging two years for the profession, the study found that female teachers were most eager to make a change with 29% planning on stepping back from the classroom either by taking parental leave (11%), reducing their hours (9%) or leaving the profession altogether (8%).

Worryingly, the research also revealed that many don’t understand how making these changes will affect their pension pot and retirement plans. More than four in ten (41%) don’t understand the impact reducing hours could have on their pension and 40% have not planned for this change financially.

Of those planning to change their working patterns, fewer than a fifth of women (18%) have made plans for their finances to help them cover day-to-day living expenses and longer-term financial goals such as retirement.

In contrast, over a quarter of men (26%) planning to adjust their working hours have made plans for both the short and long term.

Linda Wallace, Director of Financial Services at Wesleyan, said: “After the stresses of the past two years, it’s understandable why so many teachers are reassessing their work-life balance and well-being needs.

“But deciding to change how you work isn’t an easy decision – it’s important that it goes hand in hand with careful financial planning. As well as the immediate cost of living challenges to consider, it’s important to think long-term too, particularly when it comes to pensions and retirement planning.

“We know there is already a gap between men and women when it comes to their teachers’ pension, and changes to working patterns can exacerbate this. Setting goals now and carefully planning for the future is critical to ensuring your finances will see you through to a comfortable retirement.”

Classroom learning with Wacom pen tablets

Meet Wacom and the global education technology community at Bett UK and discover how Wacom pen tablets and pen displays boost digital classroom collaboration and facilitate STEAM lessons.

Wacom, the pioneer and leader in digital pen technology, is coming to Bett UK to show how Wacom’s digital education solutions complement the set-up of classrooms and auditoriums and enable new ways of learning and teaching from K12 to higher education. Join Wacom at stand SB30 to talk to Wacom experts and learn how simple and effective working, teaching and learning with the digital pen is.

Bett UK
23-25 March 2022
Stand SB30
ExCel London

 

Digital classroom collaboration powered by the pen

To show how digital pen displays support the teaching of STEAM subjects, Wacom together with Canopy Education are hosting a presentation about “Classroom learning with Wacom pen tablets” on the Tech in Action stage. In this session on Thursday, 24 March, 11:30-11:50, educators from K12 and further education will demonstrate how the use of Wacom pen tablets in the classroom increases student engagement and makes daily teaching more efficient.

Check the Bett UK agenda here for more information about the speakers and details of this talk. Find out more about the event itself and how to register on the Bett UK event page. And for more information about Wacom, its products and education solutions including case studies and special offers, please check these dedicated Wacom for Education pages.

Redefining the needs of classrooms – it’s time to take the hybrid approach

A Post-pandemic world rewrites the requirements of education technology as the traditional classroom is slowly but surely transforming into multifunctional spaces that are expected to support remote learning. This is why flexible and futureproof audio-visual solutions are no longer only desirable, but vital. Together Welltek and Artome are providing user-friendly, aesthetic and adaptable products to support learning environments everywhere.

Increasing valuable studying time…

Schools everywhere have entered an era where the ways of studying have changed permanently. Not only do they struggle in meeting the standards of remote learning now but are also aiming to find solutions that will be functional in the future as well. Valuable studying time can be lost when using non-efficient communication technology. Flexible and easy-to-use solutions are desperately needed in order to enable dynamic learning environments. One of the most important things is the display size readability in a classroom. Research* shows 58% of students in an average classroom cannot read content on a 70-inch flat panel, so size does matter.

…without forgetting the big picture

Artome smart furniture is a new innovation that offers an installation-free solution that combines Scandinavian design and audio-visual technology as it holds a sound system and an integrated ultra-short throw laser projector. It supports hybrid education with a plug-and-play videoconferencing solution and is easy to move from space to space with adaptable image size up to 150” (330cm width). When combining the fully movable audio-visual technology to flexible classrooms, it is possible to transform any space making it suitable for presenting, learning and much more.

Together Welltek and Artome share the ideology of creating spaces for learning in a sustainable way, bringing flexibility to schools, colleges, and other educational settings across the UK.

Where to Explore?

BETT 23-25 March 2022, ExCeL London, UK

 

Contact and additional information

Welltek Ltd
26 Seward Street

EC1V 3PA London

www.welltek.co

 

 

* https://neon.epson-europe.com/files/ckeditor/c/h/CHEAP_SEATS_-_report.pdf