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Free cybersecurity toolkit for schools launched

LGfL’s Elevate Cybersecurity Toolkit for schools. 

 

Hacking, phishing, malicious software and distributed denial of service (DDOS) attacks are on the increase according to the National Crime Agency. With more and more schools falling victim to cybercrime and pressure mounting on governors and school leaders to implement appropriate controls, edtech charity LGfL-The National Grid for Learning  has launched a new, free resource called the Elevate Cybersecurity Toolkit for Schools to help steer them in the right direction.

 

The new toolkit comprises a collection of key documents that schools can use to improve their cybersecurity and also use as a foundation for attaining Cyber Essentials Certification – a foundation level certification designed to provide a statement of the basic controls they should have in place to mitigate the risk from common cyber threats.

 

The following key documents can be downloaded for free:

 

A CyberSecurity Policy Template  – designed to complement the schools existing social media and acceptable use policies – which outlines the school’s guidelines and security provisions that are there to protect its systems, services, and data in the event of a cyberattack.

 

An Incident Response Plan which can be used as a starting point for planning recovery from a ransomware attack, or any other kind of unforeseen outage.

 

An Example Risk Register that can be used to assess, evaluate, prioritise and manage cybersecurity risks. This can also be used by the school’s senior leadership team to report to governors on how they are proactively managing risks and improving cybersecurity.

 

An Example Asset Register that can be used as a starting point to inventory the equipment used in the school. It sounds obvious, but it’s impossible to be secure if you don’t know what you have.

 

An Example Software Register used to record which software/systems schools have and whether they hold confidential information. This can be used to complement the Incident Response Plan for prioritising the recovery of services.

 

Commenting on the new resource, Dinesh Seegobin, Head of ICT at STEP Academy Trust, said, “We all know that being aware of cybersecurity is critical but how many of us can claim to be experts? In addition, there is so much information out there to digest, where do you begin? This is where, yet again, LGfL has come to our rescue. The Elevate Cybersecurity Toolkit is an absolute game changer. A one-stop shop to help get you on track backed up with all the weight of industry experts.”

 

To download your free copy please visit http://www.elevate.lgfl.net

Protecting your school from cyber attacks

Hacking, phishing, malicious software and distributed denial of service (DDOS) attacks are on the increase according to the National Crime Agency. With more and more schools falling victim to cybercrime and pressure mounting on governors and school leaders to implement appropriate controls, edtech charity LGfL-The National Grid for Learning  has launched a new, free resource called the Elevate Cybersecurity Toolkit for Schools to help steer them in the right direction.

 

The new toolkit comprises a collection of key documents that schools can use to improve their cybersecurity and also use as a foundation for attaining Cyber Essentials Certification – a foundation level certification designed to provide a statement of the basic controls they should have in place to mitigate the risk from common cyber threats.

 

The following key documents can be downloaded for free:

 

A CyberSecurity Policy Template  – designed to complement the schools existing social media and acceptable use policies – which outlines the school’s guidelines and security provisions that are there to protect its systems, services, and data in the event of a cyberattack.

 

An Incident Response Plan which can be used as a starting point for planning recovery from a ransomware attack, or any other kind of unforeseen outage.

 

An Example Risk Register that can be used to assess, evaluate, prioritise and manage cybersecurity risks. This can also be used by the school’s senior leadership team to report to governors on how they are proactively managing risks and improving cybersecurity.

 

An Example Asset Register that can be used as a starting point to inventory the equipment used in the school. It sounds obvious, but it’s impossible to be secure if you don’t know what you have.

 

An Example Software Register used to record which software/systems schools have and whether they hold confidential information. This can be used to complement the Incident Response Plan for prioritising the recovery of services.

 

Commenting on the new resource, Dinesh Seegobin, Head of ICT at STEP Academy Trust, said, “We all know that being aware of cybersecurity is critical but how many of us can claim to be experts? In addition, there is so much information out there to digest, where do you begin? This is where, yet again, LGfL has come to our rescue. The Elevate Cybersecurity Toolkit is an absolute game changer. A one-stop shop to help get you on track backed up with all the weight of industry experts.”

 

To download your free copy please visit http://www.elevate.lgfl.net

Department for Education provide almost 2 million laptops to students for remote learning

London, 17th August – The Department for Education (DfE), the UK government department responsible for the English education sector, has provided nearly two million electronic devices to children and young people to support their education.

The research, retrieved via the Freedom of Information Act (FOI) and analysed by the Parliament Street think tank, observed the number of laptops, tablets and phones purchased by the DfE over the past three years, for staff, teachers, and students during the era of remote learning over the pandemic.

It was revealed that the Department for Education has supplied a total of 1,939,320 electronic devices, including laptops, tablets and mobile phones, to DfE staff, as well as students, delivered via the Get Help with Technology Programme (GHwT).

The GHwT Programme has sought to provide devices to children and young people to support their education and keep them connected to teachers and peers, with laptops and tablets being lent to digitally deprived students, by schools, trusts and local authorities.

The greatest investment in devices came between July 2020 and June 2021, with 1,122,308 devices purchased, 1,114,789 of which were for the GHwT Programme.

Cybersecurity expert Achi Lewis, Area Vice President EMEA of Absolute Software, commented: “It is fantastic to see the Department for Education supplying not only their staff with new devices, but helping to deliver new technological equipment to classrooms across the UK in order to help with education and staying online, especially throughout the difficulties of the pandemic.”

“For staff connecting to the DfE’s network, and students connecting to their school network, it is important that individuals are not only educated on potential cyber threats, but also the right cybersecurity measures are in place in order to avoid sensitive data breaches.”

“Remote secure access solutions which promote strong network resiliency are the backbone of remote working environments, providing IT teams with valuable insight into device and application activity in order to identify suspicious behaviour and freeze, or shut off, compromised devices, or apply pre-defined policies to protect company resources and data.”

The news comes prior to A level results day on August 18th and GCSE results day on August 25th.

Screenshot of the DfE’s response: