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Students call for greater teamwork between teachers during the pandemic

 

  • Study by Teacherly finds that almost two thirds of pupils would like teachers to work together to create online lessons to help everyone achieve their potential amid coronavirus pandemic
  • Pupils believe schools of all reputations can learn something from each other and should work together more in delivering education during this time
  • Derby High School adopts a more collaborative and flexible approach to teaching pupils in response

 

LONDON 25th November 2020: As the EPI warns of varying levels of attendance in schools across England amid the coronavirus pandemic, a new study conducted with pupils in Britain has identified that almost two thirds (66%) of children would like teachers to work collaboratively together – joining forces and combining their skills to create online lessons that will help everyone better achieve their potential during this time.

 

The findings come as schools continue to decide how best to utilise the COVID-19 catch up funding announced by the government in June. The study, conducted by Teacherly, highlights how pupils are open to creativity, greater flexibility and collaboration within education in order for them to have a better learning experience during this highly disrupted time. The study identified that over half (53%) like the idea of attending a virtual school where they can learn through both online courses and in-person online lessons that cover a wide range of subjects – even those not available at their school. Almost a quarter (23%) of pupils who weren’t home schooled before coronavirus said they liked the idea of attending a virtual school because they’d be able to learn from a wider pool of teachers beyond those available at their school.

 

The research also found that nearly 7 in 10 (67%) pupils who weren’t home schooled before coronavirus agree that everyone should be allowed access to the best education possible, with 41% of pupils agreeing that, regardless of where they live, pupils should be able to access the best teachers. In addition, when asked about school rankings and perception of different schools as good or bad, nearly half (46%) said they believed schools of all reputations can learn something from each other and should therefore work together more closely. 

 

Atif Mahmood, CEO, of Teacherly says: “Education has been on the back foot when it comes to collaboration because schools have often been more focused on competing for the best Ofsted reviews and performance. The COVID-19 pandemic has, in many ways, removed these silos and taken the focus away from competition – in the short term at least. Evidently, there is enthusiasm among students for greater collaboration and the opportunities this creates for better education and learning. During this time in particular, where schools are having to contend with catching-up on lost time, changes to exams and ongoing disruption to in-classroom teaching, the value in collaborating should not be underestimated. We’ve started to see senior leaders from different schools uniting to share ideas and come up with solutions for tackling the challenges in this unprecedented time, but there is a clear need for this to go further.”

 

Mrs R Hamilton, Year 4, Derby High School: “In response to the COVID-19 crisis, we’ve adopted a more collaborative and flexible approach to teaching our pupils. We recognised that we needed to streamline the process of planning lessons by working together as a team across departments, making use of new online solutions that allow for collaboration and teamwork. Collaborating with other teachers within the school has helped not only with creativity but has helped to improve teamwork and reduce workloads during what is an extremely demanding time. Pupils are no longer learning from one single teacher but from all of us as a community, where we share our knowledge and skills collectively online as well as where we can in the classroom in order to provide them with the best education possible.”

 

School installs barriers to reduce risk of spreading coronavirus

A Nottinghamshire primary school has taken tough action to ensure that parents and children socially distance during drop off and pick up times, to reduce the risk of spreading Covid-19.

 

Lantern Lane Primary School, in Lantern Lane, East Leake, has installed steel barriers around the edge of the school, providing a two-metre gap between the classroom doors and parents dropping off and collecting their children.

 

The barriers were installed by local firm, Hardstaff Barriers, in Kingston on Soar, which specialises in road safety and security barriers.

 

As part of Hardstaff Barriers’ commitment to nearby schools and the local community, the barriers were installed at Lantern Lane Primary School free of charge.   

 

Hardstaff installed the red and white steel safety barrier system, known as M.A.S.S, just 24 hours after it received a request for assistance from the school.

 

M.A.S.S is also widely used across the UK as a road safety barrier. The system is specially designed to self-stabilise if a vehicle collides with the barrier, providing additional protection outside the school.

 

Donna Griggs, Business Manager at Lantern Lane Primary School, said: “We wanted to install the barriers to keep everybody at the school as safe as possible.

 

“We are confident that the barriers will reduce the risk of spreading Covid-19 during these busy times, when many parents are present in one place. We are doing everything we can to keep the children, their parents and our staff safe and thank everybody who has assisted us so far.

 

“The barriers also act as a reminder to socially distance and give the message that the school is serious about adhering to the rules.”

 

Dave Todd, Director of Hardstaff Barriers, said: “We were delighted to be able to assist Lantern Lane Primary School in this way, when the need to protect their pupils, staff and parents is greater than ever.

 

“The school has made the very responsible decision to install a robust steel barrier around its classroom entrances, providing an effective and highly visible social distancing system.

 

“As a local business committed to supporting the local community, we are very pleased that the school approached us and that we were able to swiftly step in and help them.”

MEDIA SMART TO HELP STUDENTS UNDERSTAND DAMAGING IMPACT OF PIRACY ON FILM & TV

Media Smart, The Industry Trust and its partners have launched a secondary school educational resource on intellectual property, focusing specifically on film and TV piracy

London, November 19, 2020: The UK advertising industry’s education non-profit, Media Smart, in partnership with The Industry Trust for IP Awareness, the Motion Picture Association (MPA) and the Intellectual Property Office, has launched a new school resource focused on intellectual property.

The resource – “Piracy: What’s The Big Deal?” – turns the spotlight on film and TV piracy. It encourages 11-14 year olds to think first before illegally accessing content by introducing key concepts of copyright and copyright infringement and explores the risks to individuals, the associated impact on the creative industry, and wider links to organised crime.

The teaching materials include an engaging film featuring influencer and actor Luke Franks and Sky One presenter Jacqueline Sheppard, which encourages students to identify the consequences and impact of piracy and to assess how serious these can be. Students will also be given the opportunity to create a short anti-piracy campaign in the form of a storyboard or a one-minute film. This element will run as a competition with schools being given the chance to win £2,000 worth of media equipment for their schools and prizes from digital entertainment retailer, Rakuten TV.

To view the resources and the film click here.

Rachel Barber-Mack, Director of Media Smart, commented:

“Media Smart’s supporters have long wanted to work with the wider creative industry in educating young people about piracy, a subject that is ever more important during COVID-19 – when kids are online more.

“We are proud to say that the teaching resource have been awarded the PSHE Association Quality Mark and developed to support the curriculum for living in a wider world with media literacy and digital resilience. Our partnership with the Industry Trust, MPA and IPO has enabled us to create innovative film-based materials plus competition that will resonate with and inspire our target audience.”

Liz Bales, Chief Executive of The Industry Trust, commented:

“Research conducted by the Industry Trust has found that young people are among those most likely to be tempted to infringe copyright. These studies highlight a need for anti-piracy and pro-industry messaging that engages with and informs younger audiences, allowing them to consider their actions and positively change attitudes towards piracy.

“Our aim is primarily to education young people, to encourage them to value content and respect the creative industry and also to understand the personal and very real risks they expose themselves to if they do engage with illegally sourced content. We’re delighted to partner with Media Smart in order to produce this comprehensive and engaging resource that has the potential to reach millions of young people throughout the UK.”

The importance of the resource is clear when it is estimated that more than 50% of current infringers have been a victim of hacking or viruses and 31% have been exposed to inappropriate content.[1] Furthermore, in 2019 the Intellectual Property Office estimated piracy and counterfeiting cost the UK economy £9bn and 80,500 job losses each year.[2]

In a sign of its success in increasing media literacy and digital literacy among children and young people, Media Smart recently won Gold at the International CSR Excellence Awards. This builds on other news that the programme has made the finals in two categories for The Drum Awards for Social Purpose 2020.

Virgin Media Business secures major deal with Falkirk Council to help schools deliver digital education

• Falkirk Council has appointed Virgin Media Business to support schools with next-generation digital connectivity
• The multi-year deal will provide additional bandwidth and Wi-Fi improvements for 58 local schools, making it easier and safer for students and their educators to benefit from digital learning
• Virgin Media Business redesigning schools’ wireless networks to improve coverage and security, ensuring students can learn digital skills to support them finding jobs in the future
Virgin Media Business has signed a major public sector contract with Falkirk Council that will see it improve connectivity in schools and support digital learning.

The operator will deliver new wireless networks in all the council’s 58 primary, secondary and additional support schools, providing more bandwidth to help them cope with the additional data traffic that will be generated by 18,000 new iPads given to students through the council’s Connected Falkirk project.

Virgin Media Business will provide safe and secure solutions for the schools, ensuring educators can help protect students from unsuitable content as well as provide a cloud management platform that gives the council greater flexibility in managing their connectivity. The dedicated Wi-Fi and connectivity provided through the contract also ensures equity of access in all Falkirk Council schools.

Martin McFadyen, Head of Public Sector at Virgin Media Business, said:

“We are proud that our cutting-edge technology will help Falkirk Council safeguard against network issues today, while also creating a digital learning environment fit for the future.

“With our support, thousands of children across the Falkirk area will be able to safely and securely access reliable connections that support their learning and help them build the digital skills they need to thrive in future.”

Over the next five years, Connected Falkirk will transform learning and teaching across all schools in the Falkirk area, helping to prepare children and young people to live, learn and work in a truly digital age.”

Part of the ambitious Council of the Future Change programme, Connected Falkirk is one of 23 projects that aim to modernise and improve services and help deliver the council’s three corporate priorities – Communities, Enterprise, and Innovation.

Robert Naylor, Director of Children’s Services at Falkirk Council, said:

“The investment in Connected Falkirk gives increased access to devices, coupled with a suite of powerful digital tools, increased connectivity, and a dedicated professional learning programme that will bring learning benefits to all.

“We believe our partnership with Virgin Media Business will enhance and support the delivery of learning excellence to all our children and young people.”

Carrot Productions announce a brand new arts package for schools this Christmas

Carrot Productions, the world’s leading performers of The Snowman with live orchestra, has created the perfect alternative to the traditional school outing, introducing some much-needed joy and happiness into pupils’ lives this Christmas, ALL DELIVERABLE REMOTELY IN CASE OF LOCKDOWN.

All music in the show other than The Snowman has been written by Daniel Whibley, whose orchestration of Four Notes – Paul’s Tune has gone viral, reaching number 1 in the singles charts.

Schooltime Showtime offers schools the opportunity to actively champion high quality art and cultural education in a meaningful and safe way, as well as having lots of fun. Each Gold package also provides essential and valuable work for our wonderful professional freelance musicians.

It’s much more than just a show
Schooltime Showtime also provides teachers with a comprehensive package of resources to create a hassle-free and memorable experience for all ages, including:

• Ready-to-go lesson ideas, differentiated for EYFS to Key Stage 2.

• Show and Tell live online session with a musician, conductor, composer or author.

• Fun videos of instrument-making from junk by the musicians and their families, Makaton Christmas Carols filmed at a special school, and dance instruction from a professional dancer.

• 7 day streaming of The Snowman Tour show, affording a close-up view of some of the UK’s finest musicians, handpicked from orchestras including the BBC Scottish, Hallé and BBC Philharmonic.

• The final performance features a Christmas medley, a fun introduction to the orchestra and even a visit from The Snowman himself. Additionally, there is an exclusive adaptation of the award-winning book The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield, commissioned by Carrot Productions in 2017. This beautifully-illustrated tale of music, friendship and adventure features music by Daniel Whibley played live by the orchestra, and a narration recorded by Joanna Lumley.

Incredible value
The packages represent excellent value – starting at £295 for the whole school – and offer 100% risk free booking. They have been designed to be deliverable in a flexible way, are accessible entirely from within a school setting, can be shared with multiple bubbles at once, and the materials and final show can be shared online with pupils at home in the instance of a lockdown or isolation.

SafeToNet and the Anti Bullying Alliance stand united against bullying

SafeToNet are proud to announce their support for Anti-Bullying Week 2020, which will take place from Monday 16 – Friday 20 November. This year’s themeis United Against Bullying, which urges the nation to come together and play their part inpreventing and responding appropriately to bullying both face to face and online.  

New statistics from the Anti-Bullying Alliance show that a third of children in the UK have been bullied in the last six months, with one in five children on the receiving end of bullying behaviour once per week or more. Heartbreakingly, the number of children reporting they have more than one close friend dropped following the outbreak, going from 91% in 2019 to 86.5% in October 2020. 

As a leading safeguarding company, SafeToNet understand the long-term impact and consequences bullying can have on children and young people and are passionate aboutplaying their part in the fight against these threats. Their mission is simple; to safeguard as many children as possible against online risks such as bullying and to educate them and their parents on becoming safe, responsible digital citizens. By joining forces andchannelling their collective ambitions, efforts, and platforms, SafeToNet and the Anti Bullying Alliance are working to beat bullying together. They believe that everyone – from parents and carers, to teachers and politicians, to children and young people – all have a part to play in coming together to make a real difference.  

The app, which is downloaded onto both the parent and child’s devices, uses an AI-driven smart keyboard to detect and filter risks and harmful content in real time, before any harm is caused. The pioneering technology has been designed specifically to pick up on a user’s psychological wellbeing, recognising signs of doubt, low self-esteem and dark thoughts, and offering support and guidance in the moment. The privacy of the children is paramount; what they are looking at, who they are talking to and what they are typing is never seen or read by the parents or by SafeToNet. 

Due to the Covid-19 lockdown, children have spent more time than ever online this year,doing everything from socialising to schoolwork online with less adult supervision than normal, creating an even greater opportunity for online bullying. In this sense, there is an even greater need for SafeToNet as a real time safeguarding solution to ensure that children have the necessary tools to navigate the digital world safely and feel comfortable havinginformed, constructive conversations with parents or guardians about online behaviour.  

Anti-Bullying Week 2020 includes a number of events and activities in order to raise awareness and highlight the issues surrounding bullying; Odd Socks Day on Monday 16 November asks workplaces and schools to encourage everyone to turn up wearing odd socks to embrace their individuality and celebrate difference, whilst the School Staff Award  

allows pupils to nominate their favourite anti-bullying member of school staff for a prize, to celebrate the adults who are standing up to bullying and making a difference. There will also be a range of online activities with resources and ideas on how parents and schools can get involved and play their part,  

Co-founder of SafeToNet Sharon Pursey says ‘We are honoured to be supporting Anti-Bullying Week again and stand united against bullying; we are all a piece of the puzzle and have our responsibility to ensure children’s safety and wellbeing. As a safeguarding tech company, our vision is to create a world where all children are automatically safe online and are protected from digital threats such as bullying, so by supporting this initiative we hope to raise some awareness and start the conversation about digital safety and wellbeing in schools and households across the UK.”  

Martha Evans, Director of the Anti-Bullying Alliance says ‘It’s clear that bullying remains a significant problem for many children across the country, and we know that these experiences can have a lasting impact well into adulthood. But this year we have witnessed the power that people can have when they unite to tackle a common challenge. If we are serious about reducing bullying, we have to harness that energy and work together. Itsespecially important that the digital world is a safe place for children and young people to enjoy, and we are delighted to team up with SafeToNet again this year, who have been at the forefront in developing software to support families. But whether it is online, in the community or in school, we all have a part to play and its time we came together, friends and family, classmates and colleagues, and unite against bullying.’ 

Standing desks: School children choose to stand in class when given the opportunity, new study finds

  • Providing a standing desk to every primary school child in a UK classroom can reduce sitting time
  • Children who had access to a standing desk reduced their sitting by around 20% over eight months
  • Behaviour-related mental health scores deteriorated after desk exposure, according to teachers’ questionnaires

Providing a standing desk to every primary school child in a UK classroom can reduce sitting time throughout most of the academic year, according to a new study.

Researchers at Loughborough University installed standing desks at a school in Bradford for eight-months to measure the impact they had on children’s sitting habits and classroom behaviour.

The children, aged nine-to-10, were in control of whether they sat or stood, and were asked to wear monitors for two weeks before the new desks were in place, and again at four months and eight months after the desks had been installed.

The monitors measured sitting time as well as moving from sitting to standing.

After eight months, the children had reduced their sitting time by an average of 60 min (20%) compared to before the new desks were installed.

A similar class in a nearby school was used as a control and did not receive any standing desks. These children’s class time sitting did not change during the study

Compared to the control class, the children who had access to sit-to-stand desks reduced their sitting by approximately 25% at four months and 20% at eight months.

Researcher Aron Sherry, of the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences (SSEHS), said: “The findings suggest providing sit–stand desks to every child within a UK primary school classroom can reduce class time sitting throughout most of an academic year.

“Furthermore, positive changes were observed in standing and sit-to-stand transitions during class time at both follow-ups.

“This study was located within a deprived setting with a high proportion of ethnic minorities, making the findings more important in relation to reducing health inequalities.

“The sit–stand desks did not impact negatively on musculoskeletal discomfort, or cognitive function, and were generally well tolerated by pupils and staff.”

The study also looked at changes in behaviour-related mental health, using a questionnaire, completed by the teacher for each student.

It found that behaviour-related mental health scores deteriorated after four months of desk exposure, and then further again after eight months.

Aron said: “This decline does contrast with an interview with the teacher during the study, who suggested that classroom behaviour had improved because the children stayed at the same desk amongst the same students throughout the school day.

“Behaviour related-mental health scores remained stable in a control class throughout the study in a nearby school.”

Researchers also explored child and teacher attitudes, experiences, and behaviours towards the desks.

They found that the standing desks also had implications for teaching methods; teachers were unable to walk around the class when offering help.

Instead, children were asked to come to the front of the class if they needed assistance

“We concluded that the lack of classroom space, due to the stools and chairs blocking walkways, may have contributed to this observed decline in behaviour scores and challenges to teaching practicalities,” said Aron.

“Future standing desk models that enable the stool to be tucked under the desk may prevent such issues occurring.”

He added: “Larger trials, implemented within similar high-priority settings, and using more in-depth qualitative and quantitative measures are needed to better establish whether standing desks using a full desk allocation system are feasible, or effective in UK primary schools.

“This will however depend on the balance between the desired level of standing desk provision – full versus partial allocation – class size, and available budgets.”

The results have been published in the paper, Impacts of a Standing Desk Intervention within an English Primary School Classroom: A Pilot Controlled Trial.

Ultimate Cloud-Based Hybrid Learning Platform Launched to Support Schools

Impero unites new classroom management tool with safeguarding solutions, all in one platform

School safeguarding leader Impero today launches a cloud-based hybrid learning platform for schools, the Impero back:drop family, built on state-of-the-art technology. This platform brings together Impero class:room and Impero well:being, providing the tools teachers, pastoral staff and leaders need to create safe and productive digital lessons.

The Secretary of State for Education recently placed temporary continuity direction powers on schools to provide immediate access to remote education for pupils if they are absent because of Covid-19. In addition, the Department for Education recently updated its Keeping Children Safe in Education guidance with additional instructions on safeguarding in schools, furthering the need for solutions that combine hybrid learning and safeguarding.

Impero class:room puts teachers in control with powerful, easy-to-use classroom management features so they can confidently deliver online instruction and improve engagement, across every device. It’s the first of its type to fully embed into  Microsoft Teams, beyond chat monitoring. Features include the ability to view learner’s devices, control access to the internet, lock screens to individual pages, send messages securely and block certain websites.

Impero well:being provides a seamless link between on and offline safeguarding, enabling school staff to identify at-risk students and build a full picture for early intervention. Using Impero’s keyword detection software, it captures potentially at-risk online behaviour in real-time. Teachers can analyse the screenshot from the learner’s screen, log the incident and assign it to other relevant staff members.

Justin Reilly, CEO Impero says: “At Impero, we believe that every school’s first responsibility is to keep their learners safe wherever they are, which is why we developed Impero back:drop as a free to use cloud-based service. Once students are safe, schools must educate them. With the newly added Impero class:room and Impero well:being services, teachers can create the ultimate hybrid learning environment. The robust classroom management features help teachers keep children engaged in lessons by creating a slick virtual learning environment. Meanwhile, the safeguarding features help teachers keep a closer eye on their students. It’s the perfect tool for the current moment and the inevitable blended learning environments of the future.”

The cloud-based platform builds on Impero’s freemium safeguarding product, Impero back:drop, which provides the core features needed to record and manage safeguarding concerns. When paired with Impero class:room and Impero well:being, the functionality is enhanced to deliver classroom management and a holistic chronology of student’s wellbeing.

The Impero back:drop family works on all of the major operating systems, Windows, Chrome, Mac, iOS and Android.

World-class streamable arts package by Carrot Productions offers schools an exciting alternative to annual Christmas outings

Carrot Productions, the world’s leading performers of The Snowman with live orchestra, has created the perfect alternative to the traditional school outing, introducing some much-needed joy and happiness into pupils’ lives this Christmas.

Schooltime Showtime offers schools the opportunity to actively champion high quality art and cultural education in a meaningful and safe way, as well as having lots of fun. Each GOLD package also provides essential and valuable work for our wonderful professional musicians.

It’s much more than just a show

Schooltime Showtime also provides teachers with a comprehensive package of resources to create a hassle-free and memorable experience for all ages, including:

Ready-to-go lesson ideas, differentiated for EYFS to Key Stage 2.

Show and Tell live online session with a musician, conductor, composer or author.

Fun videos of instrument-making from junk by the musicians and their families, Makaton Christmas Carols from a special school, and dance instruction from a professional dancer.

7 day streaming of The Snowman Tour show, affording a close-up view of some of the UK’s finest musicians, handpicked from orchestras including the BBC Scottish, Hallé and BBC Philharmonic.

The final performance features a Christmas medley, a fun introduction to the orchestra and even a visit from The Snowman himself. Additionally, there is an exclusive adaptation of the award-winning book The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield, commissioned by Carrot Productions in 2017. This beautifully-illustrated tale of music, friendship and adventure features music by Daniel Whibley played live by the orchestra, and a narration recorded by Joanna Lumley.

Incredible value

The packages represent excellent value – starting at £295 for the whole school – and offer 100% risk free booking. They have been designed to be deliverable in a flexible way, are accessible entirely from within a school setting, can be shared with multiple bubbles at once, and the materials and final show can be shared online with pupils at home in the instance of a lockdown or isolation.

LEAF Education leads the way in educating students about careers in farming and food production

In the last academic year, more than 9,000 students learnt about the many exciting career opportunities available to them in the food and farming sector, reveals national education organisation, LEAF Education, in its latest impact report – Our Work in Action 2019-2020.

The report also highlights the wider impact LEAF Education has had on reconnecting young people with food production, farming and the environment, especially given the challenges and disruptions caused by the global pandemic.

Carl Edwards, Director of Education and Public Engagement at LEAF Education, explains: “The education of millions of children was severely disrupted by the health crisis between April and July this year. But, despite the lockdown, the LEAF Education team were able to deliver an imaginative and immersive online programme of activity which ensured that thousands of young people of all ages could continue to learn and be inspired by the journey of their food – from farm to fork. A key part of this activity was to raise their awareness of the many exciting career paths and opportunities in the agricultural industry. As the consumers and decision makers of the future, helping them understand the important role farming plays in their everyday lives, has never been more important.”

Highlights from the report:

  • LEAF Education successfully engaged with and educated 9,238 students about a career in agriculture.
  • LEAF Education worked with 10,586 children and spent a total of 24,589 hours working with them.
  • LEAF Education developed a comprehensive range of online resources on Countryside Classroom, specifically for use in the home-setting in response to the first national lockdown.
  • Countryside Classroom saw a 77% increase in users to the website in 2020 and received over 158,000 unique users (over the past academic year 2019/20).
  • Over 134,000 Countryside Classroom resources were accessed this year.
  • 100% of teachers reported that LEAF Education had increased their confidence in delivering more food and farming work in the classroom.
  • LEAF Education worked with 1,357 teachers for 16,309 hours including 106 trainee teachers.
  • LEAF Education supported farmers to deliver high-quality educational activities working with 3,531 farmers in 2019/20. 100% of farmers said the training offered was ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’, 49 farmers received CEVAS (Countryside Educational Visits Accreditation Scheme) training.

LEAF Education works across the education, farming and food sectors to inspire and engage teachers and young people about food production, farming and the environment. It manages a number of leading industry and educational initiatives, including Farmer Time (live, on-farm virtual education sessions), CEVAS for outdoor learning providers, Countryside Classroom (online information portal), Chef on the Farm and LEAF Open Farm School Days. LEAF Education alsoprovides teachers with curriculum and exam specification – focused training, tools and resources to help them deliver high-quality learning experiences about food production, farming and the environment.

In 2021, LEAF Education will once again be on the search for the Innovation School of the Year in Food, Farming and Environment. As part of a partnership with Coleg Cambria Llysfasi, the national competition enables students to be immersed in practical farm activities such as milking cows, handling sheep, using drone technology, seeing agro-forestry in action and tractor driving.

You can see the full LEAF Education Our Work in Action Report here: https://issuu.com/linking-environment-and-farming/docs/leaf_20education_20work_20in_20action_202019-20?fr=sZWZhMDIwOTQwMDA