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Disadvantaged pupils have no less enthusiasm for science than their more affluent counterparts

UCLan researchers share first-stage findings of Blackpool-focused research project to improve engagement with science and technology

 

Primary school children from low socio-economic areas are just as interested in science as their more affluent counterparts, according to new research from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan). However, a lack of knowledge about possible science careers means their aspirations for scientific roles later in life could be lost.

 

These findings, published in the Journal of Science Communication (JCOM), come from the ongoing four-year Blackpool PIER (Physics: Inspire, Engage, Research) project conducted by Professor Robert Walsh and Dr Cherry Canovan from UCLan. The research is funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) as part of a Fellowship in Public Engagement held by Walsh.

 

It involves pupils from three primary and two secondary schools in Blackpool, one of the most socio-economically deprived areas of the UK, and aims to improve engagement with science and technology, especially space science, amongst a very low participation group.

 

The project is following the same cohort of pupils as they progress from Year 6 to Year 9. Initial findings, drawn from surveys, interviews and other assessments with Year 6 pupils at the beginning of the study, found that as a group the children are as interested in science as their peers from more affluent backgrounds.

 

This study suggests that attempts to increase science participation among these groups should not simply promote the subject as ‘fun’ or ‘interesting’ but could have a greater impact by demonstrating clearly how science can open up possible future career opportunities.

 

Research Associate Dr Cherry Canovan, lead author on the paper, said: “It is heartening to speak to these young people and find that they are enthusiastic about science, yet we often don’t see this interest translates into an expectation of future job opportunities involving science.

 

“There are likely a number of factors involved here. The pupils we spoke to know it is useful to study science, but don’t really know why, and have a limited understanding of the breadth of science-related careers. Many just can’t see themselves ‘being scientists’ despite saying they enjoyed the subject, with some fearing it would be incompatible with how they like to be perceived, for example being sporty, ‘girly’, or the class joker.

 

“In addition, the pupils we interviewed didn’t have science role models to emulate and while many said their parents had an interest in science, the proportion among the PIER cohort who said their parents would expect them to go to university was around ten percent lower than among the same demographic nationally*.”

 

Professor Walsh and Dr Canovan have used these results to plan a series of engagement activities with the pupils over the following three years to see if they can influence decisions to study science to GCSE level and possibly beyond.

 

Professor Walsh said: “Much government policy towards boosting science in higher education in particular focuses on an assumed lack of interest and desire in low-socioeconomic groups. However, the enthusiasm is already there and this ‘hidden science identity’ needs to be revealed and translated into real-life prospects for these young people.

 

“It is concerning that while pupils stated that science was useful, they did not have the understanding to back this up; this suggests that often methods used to disseminate this message could be lacking in practical effectiveness, information that may provide some cause for reflection among the wider science communication community.

 

“We’re recommending that programmes instead allow young people to explore their science identity more fully and provide innovative ways for them to discover the kinds of jobs that studying science may lead to.”

 

The PIER project has been conducting four different types of activities each year for the PIER participants, which translates to around 36 hours of science contact for each pupil overall. This includes ‘meet the scientists’ events, trips to UCLan’s Alston Observatory and Young Scientist Centre as well as family science events at school. All pupils will be reassessed at the end of the process to see if their attitudes, understanding and relationship to science has changed.

 

Dr Canovan is also conducting an ongoing research project into the impact of Covid-related school closures on primary science learning and said the pandemic could exacerbate scientific inequalities.

 

“We are beginning to see evidence that science learning loss due to lockdown is a much greater problem in traditionally low-participation communities. Teachers felt less able to set science work due to concerns about internet access and asking parents to provide resources for activities. For many of these children, school is their only opportunity to access science; ongoing Covid restrictions could further widen the gap between the science ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’.”

 

She added: “Blackpool is just one example of a community where young people are being left behind. It is not just in the interest of the pupils themselves to see working in science as a realistic prospect, but as the government looks to increase jobs in areas such as the space industry, cybersecurity and clean energy, then the UK needs a much larger pool to draw this future workforce from.”

 

The paper, A space to study: expectations and aspirations toward science among a low-participation cohort, is available to download on the JCOM website.

 

Teachers, parents and students must work together as Greenwich schools move back online

 

From Monday evening, all schools in Greenwich will be moving their classes online to reduce coronavirus transmissions between children in education in an effort to control the London borough’s infection rate, which is currently at its highest since March.

 

The move back to online learning follows council leader, Danny Thorpe, underlining that Greenwich is showing signs of a period of exponential growth which need immediate addressing, despite the government threatening legal action to keep schools open until the start of the Christmas holidays on Friday.

 

Following the news, Hilary Stephenson, managing director at Sigma, a user experience (UX) design agency, has offered some insight into how to make the transition online as successful as possible and why schools should be working to optimise their use of technology in teaching.

 

Hilary said: “Schools must update their approach to remote teaching based on previous lockdowns, as it moves back to online learning, while children are kept at home as Greenwich seeks to get the virus back under control.

 

“The transition between face-to-face and virtual education needs to be as seamless as possible to minimise the disruption of a child’s education. For the best outcomes, teaching staff, parents and children are going to have to work together to iron out any creases which were apparent earlier in the year, and any new issues that may arise as learning becomes remote again. Schools and local authorities shouldn’t lose sight of the need to make remote learning inclusive, with the same opportunities given to all pupils regardless of their home situation, accessibility or learning needs.

 

“Looking ahead, a blended approach to learning is the future of education as digital becomes more and more integrated in teaching. While the coming weeks will be challenging for all involved, schools in London should view the short-term closure of classrooms as a chance to assess which blending learning approaches work best for their teachers and pupils. Schools who do well to use this time to optimise their use of technology and will place themselves in an ideal position as we move to more remote, digitally-enabled ways of learning.”

 

Ultimate Cloud-Based Hybrid Learning Platform Launched to Support Schools

Impero unites new classroom management tool with safeguarding solutions, all in one platform

School safeguarding leader Impero today launches a cloud-based hybrid learning platform for schools, the Impero back:drop family, built on state-of-the-art technology. This platform brings together Impero class:room and Impero well:being, providing the tools teachers, pastoral staff and leaders need to create safe and productive digital lessons.

The Secretary of State for Education recently placed temporary continuity direction powers on schools to provide immediate access to remote education for pupils if they are absent because of Covid-19. In addition, the Department for Education recently updated its Keeping Children Safe in Education guidance with additional instructions on safeguarding in schools, furthering the need for solutions that combine hybrid learning and safeguarding.

Impero class:room puts teachers in control with powerful, easy-to-use classroom management features so they can confidently deliver online instruction and improve engagement, across every device. It’s the first of its type to fully embed into  Microsoft Teams, beyond chat monitoring. Features include the ability to view learner’s devices, control access to the internet, lock screens to individual pages, send messages securely and block certain websites.

Impero well:being provides a seamless link between on and offline safeguarding, enabling school staff to identify at-risk students and build a full picture for early intervention. Using Impero’s keyword detection software, it captures potentially at-risk online behaviour in real-time. Teachers can analyse the screenshot from the learner’s screen, log the incident and assign it to other relevant staff members.

Justin Reilly, CEO Impero says: “At Impero, we believe that every school’s first responsibility is to keep their learners safe wherever they are, which is why we developed Impero back:drop as a free to use cloud-based service. Once students are safe, schools must educate them. With the newly added Impero class:room and Impero well:being services, teachers can create the ultimate hybrid learning environment. The robust classroom management features help teachers keep children engaged in lessons by creating a slick virtual learning environment. Meanwhile, the safeguarding features help teachers keep a closer eye on their students. It’s the perfect tool for the current moment and the inevitable blended learning environments of the future.”

The cloud-based platform builds on Impero’s freemium safeguarding product, Impero back:drop, which provides the core features needed to record and manage safeguarding concerns. When paired with Impero class:room and Impero well:being, the functionality is enhanced to deliver classroom management and a holistic chronology of student’s wellbeing.

The Impero back:drop family works on all of the major operating systems, Windows, Chrome, Mac, iOS and Android.

Poor broadband connection in the U.K. hinders online learning, E-learning Index finds

As COVID-19 centres the role of e-learning in education, this study examines the digital infrastructure of 30 countries in the OECD to uncover those best prepared for the digital shift

  • Internet Broadband speed in the U.K. is 67.2 Mbit/s, less than half the speed of the U.S. 
  • The U.K. has 4,281 online education courses, more than France, Germany, Spain, and the Netherlands combined.
  • The U.K. surprisingly ranks fourth for government spending on education per pupil, at 38% of GDP per capita.

The digital learning platform Preply has published a study that examines the technological infrastructure and accessibility in 30 countries worldwide. The state of digital infrastructure, the number of digital educational courses, and the market for e-learning were all analysed to uncover the countries best prepared for a shift to online learning.

School closures as a result of coronavirus exacerbated weaknesses in the U.K.’s digital infrastructure. This study compares the digital infrastructure in the U.K. with other countries worldwide to identify necessary areas for development. Pertinent data was analysed on the state of the nation’s digital infrastructure, digital educational offerings, and the e-learning market to give a comprehensive overview of multiple factors that influence access to e-learning.

“We are convinced that e-learning has a great potential to improve educational opportunities worldwide,” says Kirill Bigai, CEO of Preply. “The coronavirus pandemic has demonstrated that access to digital education is unequally distributed, but that there are ample opportunities to begin investing in the digital infrastructure necessary for a national shift to online learning. This study aims to uncover the extent to which all learners have access to adequate digital tools and resources.”

The U.K. ranks 16th place overall and first place in the index for accessibility to online education with 91.7% of students having access to computers from home. It also has 4,281 distance learning courses, by far the highest in Europe. By comparison, Germany has just 220 and Spain 260. However, the U.K. ranks average in the index for hourly salaries offered to tutors, at £14.60 per hour, compared to £26.56 an hour in Denmark and £17.17 an hour in France. The U.K. is also pulled drastically down in the ranking due to its broadband and mobile download speeds. Broadband speed, for example, stands at 67.2 Mbit/s in the U.K., while France, Spain and Canada, boast internet speeds more than twice as fast.

 Table 1: Top 16 countries with the best conditions for e-learning, with selected factors*

RankCountryAccess to computersInternet- speed Broadband  Tutoring per hourScore
1Norway94.9%127.2 Mbit/s£20.35100.0
2Denmark93.1%141.7 Mbit/s£26.5699.4
3Switzerland90.3%155.9 Mbit/s£26.3395.4
4Luxemburg95.4%114.3 Mbit/s£22.6094.4
5Netherlands97.6%112.8 Mbit/s£16.2684.8
6Sweden92.8%141.7 Mbit/s£15.2679.0
7Austria85.4%56.5 Mbit/s£18.0775.8
8New Zealand80.0%114.8 Mbit/s£15.1573.8
9Finland93.5%91.9 Mbit/s£17.1771.0
10Australia82.4%45.9 Mbit/s£16.4767.7
11Canada85.6%123.3 Mbit/s£14.7766.5
12United States72.0%138.0 Mbit/s£14.2561.1
13Germany92.9%91.3 Mbit/s£9.9460.8
14France84.1%135.2 Mbit/s£17.1757.3
15Hungary79.7%131.2 Mbit/s£6.4852.7
16United Kingdom91.7%67.2 Mbit/s£14.6051.9

 *This list is an extraction of a greater study. A complete overview of all data, methodology and sources can be found at https://preply.com/en/d/e-learning-index/

Further findings: 

  • Mexico offers the worst conditions for e-learning offerings. Only 44.3% of Mexicans have private computer access, and slow internet makes real-time collaboration impossible. 
  • The U.S. offers 9,303 online degree programs and courses that can be taken entirely online, while also providing the greatest variety of digital educational opportunities.
  • Canada offers the best value for money when it comes to internet access. In addition, the Canadian government invests around 31% of GDP per capita in tertiary education. 
  • Internal data from Preply reveals that the biggest market growth last year was in Portugal.
  • Japan ranks surprisingly poorly, in 26th place. The technologically advanced country offers a rich market for e-learning offerings, but sluggish Internet and inadequate digital educational opportunities are holding back the potential for e-learning.

About Preply: Preply is an online learning platform, connecting a global network of tens of thousands of active learners and 15,000 verified tutors to study and teach over 50 languages. With tutor and student matches being made through a machine-learning algorithm, recommended tutors create customised lesson plans to suit the learner’s budget, schedule and current knowledge. To date, students from 150 countries have taken over two million classes from teachers based in 110 countries.

Preply was founded in 2013 by Ukrainian based cofounders Kirill Bigai, Dmytro Voloshyn, and Serge Lukyanov. The company has since raised over USD $15 million and has 145 employees of 25 nationalities working across offices in Kyiv and Barcelona.

Maverick AV Solutions launches Teams Platform training to educators

Woman sit at desk looking at computer screen where collage of diverse people webcam view. Indian ethnicity young woman lead video call distant chat, group of different mates using videoconference app

Distributor Maverick AV Solutions and unified communications specialist Collabtech have joined forces to launch expert training for teachers utilising the Microsoft Teams platform.

David Johnson, general manager at Maverick AV Solutions says;

“Microsoft Teams has become essential for modern learning at all stages of education. Many educators are familiar with the use of Microsoft Office, however the transition to hybrid working requires new skill sets. We have worked with the collaboration specialists at Collabtech to test and develop a set of training sessions for our integrators to deploy rapidly into the education market.”

The course, which will be delivered by the training experts at Collabtech is broken down into five modules starting with a basic introduction to Teams then develops into a full exploration of the platform. Throughout the modules, teachers will learn how to utilise and organise their students, empowering them to create their own methods of education. The final session contains a number of scenarios in which participants apply their knowledge as well as a whole platform review.

Jon Sidwick, President at Collabtech Group talks about his training team; 

“Our entire team are daily users and trained experts of the Microsoft Teams platform. They are ready to work with lecturers, teachers and students to develop regular workflows that are accessible to all levels of education across Europe.” 

The course is being delivered in English, German, Spanish, French and Mandarin. Tutorials are accessed live through a Teams call to maximise usage of the platform and allow participants to ask any questions they have.

Bronagh O’Neill, deputy head at Dagenham Park School, which was the first education establishment to use the training explains;

“The last few months have meant that the integration of Microsoft Teams has been essential to enable the teachers to collaborate and keep the school operating while we are all working remotely. We took this training as a group to enable us to make better use of it as a tool and are passing on our knowledge to the rest of the team.”

By enabling teachers to become confident with the Teams platform, lessons can be presented and work managed more efficiently. This has a direct positive impact on the key performance indicators of students and will help to ensure that hybrid education is a viable and desirable method of teaching. 

The Teams training launch coincides with the launch of a smart learning bundle from Logitech, which enables video collaboration using Microsoft Teams in the classroom, available from Maverick throughout Europe. 

EDUCATION INVESTOR AWARDS 2020: DISCOVERY EDUCATION ANNOUNCED AS GRAND PRIX FINALIST

Digital learning provider shortlisted for ‘Ed Tech Firm of the Year’ industry prize

Discovery Education, the global leader in curriculum-aligned digital resources and professional learning for primary and secondary schools, has been announced as a finalist at this year’s prestigious Education Investor Awards.

Organised by Education Investor Global, the awards are a flagship industry event celebrating excellence in the business of UK education. This year they also recognise how firms have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic and maintained innovation and growth during a challenging period for the sector.

Discovery Education is proud to be nominated for the prestigious Grand Prix, as a contender for Ed Tech Firm of the Year.

Robin Headlee, Managing Director of Discovery Education International, said:

“We’re delighted to be shortlisted for this prestigious industry prize, which recognises our efforts to provide continuity of learning for millions of students during the pandemic. From providing no-cost access to our award-winning digital resources to developing new apps to facilitate social distancing, Discovery Education mobilised its Covid-19 response quickly and effectively to support students, teachers and parents around the world.”

During the initial Covid-19 pandemic school closures, Discovery Education served its base of 45 million existing students, as well as millions more learners needing immediate support, ensuring that learning can continue, wherever students are located.  Discovery Education has also provided extensive support for educators, with professional learning events dedicated to providing educators strategies they can use to continue student learning during the pandemic.

Howard Lewis, Discovery Education’s UK Managing Director said:

“Discovery Education is committed to supporting students, teachers and parents as they navigate the challenges of this global pandemic. Maintaining continuity of learning is our priority and we’ve introduced a whole range of measures – including home access to our award-winning Espresso service – to help students access dynamic digital content and stay engaged and motivated, wherever they are based. ”

For more information about Discovery Education’s digital resources and professional learning services visit www.discoveryeducation.co.uk and stay connected via Twitter and LinkedIn.

BRIDGING THE EDUCATION GAP NEW ‘CONNECTED EDUCATION’ PILOT LAUNCHES IN NEWBURY SCHOOL

  • Vodafone launches Connected Education: a suite of digital tools and services including tablet devices, connectivity and security.
  • Includes mobile Wi-Fi to boost school connectivity and specialist training to help teachers with digital skills.
  • Incorporates Microsoft Teams for Education.
  • Pilot will run for six months in Newbury, Berkshire.

Vodafone today announced trials of ‘Connected Education’, a new suite of digital services for teachers and pupils. It includes tablet devices for teachers and children, mobile Wi-Fi connectivity, advanced-grade security and technology consultancy for educators. It also incorporates Microsoft Teams for Education, an online classroom environment where students can connect with teachers and classmates easily and safely. The pilot will be running for six months at St Joseph’s primary school in Newbury.

With an estimated one million children and young people in the UK with inadequate access to technology at home[1], providing digital devices and connectivity can help bridge the digital divide. For children, access to education platforms at a young age will help them gain vital digital skills, essential for many jobs of the future[2].

Connected Education provides straightforward access to classwork, school materials and resources suited to a range of learning styles. It enables a teacher to provide an in-classroom and remote learning experience at the same time, using tools such as video and creating digital exercise books. This ensures children forced to miss school due to illness or quarantine can continue to join the class if they are well enough. 

Time-consuming tasks – such as lesson preparation and analysis of data to monitor a child’s progress – can be partly automated via the Microsoft Education platform, giving teachers an estimated 30% more time for student-focused activities such as developing relationships or supporting those who need more help[3]

The Connected Education package includes technology consultancy from independent provider Tablet Academy to help Heads understand how to digitise their school and get the most from technology.  Teachers also benefit from digital skills training to help ensure they can get the best from the solution.  Vodafone provides telephone support so issues can be quickly resolved. 

Michael Robinson, Deputy Head Teacher at St Joseph’s School said: “We are delighted to be working with Vodafone and excited about the opportunities this pilot could present. We hope it will provide teachers with new and creative ways to deliver teaching; and enable Year Six children at our school to experience something they wouldn’t normally have access to. We recognise that using such tools as a part of their school day will help develop vital digital skills without them even realising.”

Anne Sheehan, Business Director, Vodafone UK, said: “We are excited to be working with St Joseph’s in Newbury to trial our Connected Education solution. The recent months have highlighted the importance of digital education platforms that children can access whenever they need to.  We hope this pilot will showcase the effectiveness of such provision. By incorporating devices, connectivity, specialist training and advanced security, we can help increase vital digital skills and ensure no child is left behind, whatever their circumstances.”

Connected Education has been developed by Vodafone Business Ventures, which combines social purpose and technical expertise to change lives for the better. A full commercial proposition of Connected Education is due to be available to educators and councils across the UK during 2021.

Vodafone recently announced it is working with Coventry University to trial state-of-the-art virtual reality learning for student nurses and health professionals over the next phase of 5G technology.


[1] Nominet Trust 2019

[2] DCMS reported in 2019 that 82% of online job advertisements require digital skills.

[3] Microsoft and McKinsey & Company 2020.

AVer Europe launches mechanical arm visualiser with impressive 322X zoom

MSRP: £799 ex VAT

LONDON – 14 October 2020 – AVer Europe, the award-winning provider of video collaboration and education technology solutions, announces the launch of the AVerVision M90UHD Mechanical Arm Visualiser. This innovative teaching tool is destined to engage students in exciting new ways with its 322X total zoom (14X optical, 23X digital) document camera. 

Enhancing the whole student learning experience, teachers can go from a massive A3 shooting area to focusing on small details, such as tiny postage stamps. The incredible zooming power is complemented by lucid imaging from an Ultra HD, 13-megapixel lens and super-quick autofocusing, displaying every subtle detail.

Along with projecting intricate live images, the AVerVision M90UHD enables one-push recording, image capturing, and playback. These options make it easy for users to create content to use instantly in class or save for creating interactive assignments or online courses later. Its convenient playback function also helps educators reflect on their own teaching methods and evolve content to help develop a dynamic learning environment. 

The AVerVision M90UHD’s long mechanical arm is highly extendable, and its weighted base lets users change the camera angle without shaking the whole device and creating a wobbly image. This stability and reach allows teachers using the M90UHD as a USB webcam for livestreaming to give distance learning students a view of their on-campus classmates, reducing the isolation of learning from home. In addition to USB connectivity, HDMI and VGA ports offer convenient versatility.

 “The M90UHD is a visualiser with an impressive line-up of features, all serving to help teachers demonstrate different types of materials in an extraordinarily vivid way, “said Rene Buhay, AVer Europe Vice President of Sales & Marketing. “What’s more, instinctive function buttons, an extendable arm, and AVerTouch software allow teachers of any subject to create fantastic collaborations in next to no time.”

AVerTouch software compatibility is an additional feature of the M90UHD. This free app connects the visualizer to student and teacher devices, and users can sync the system with the cloud to automatically save images and videos.

‘Mindful e-learning tech’ rolled out to help pupils close COVID-19 learning gap

  • New AI education platform Shiken launches to offer students mindful learning
  • Focused on STEM content for GCSE students and undergraduate medics, it offers over 50,000 free quizzes and trivia questions to support pupils as they progress through the new academic year 
  • Using teacher-created content, the app helps to address ongoing disruption to education by acting as a remote, on-demand learning tool with integrated mental health support  
  • Designed by a doctor, a headteacher, and a video game specialist, multiple domains of expertise are brought together in one user-friendly platform 
  • It’s already being used by 4,500 pupils, with over 1,000 tutors and 200 schools on the waiting list
  • On average, users are spending 35 minutes per day on the platform, with 8 minutes dedicated to mindfulness practice

London, UK – A new AI education platform has launched, integrating mindfulness techniques with AI-driven learning tools to help students catch up on lost summer-term learning and cope with future disruption. 

The platform, called Shiken (meaning ‘test’ or ‘exam’ in Japanese), offers GCSE Maths and Science support, as well as tailored help for students studying medicine at university. There are over 50,000 teacher-created questions, quizzes and study tools currently available. 

Crucially, Shiken combines AI insights with gamification and tailored exercises to create mindful learning experiences. With academic and covid-related anxiety still at worryingly high levels amongst teens, the platform is designed to positively impact their mental health whilst easing them back into education. 

With one-in-20 school pupils still absent from the classroom, Shiken offers a balanced blend of guided and independent learning. This is designed to foster continued self-directed study – a skill designed to prepare students for A Levels as well as potential future lockdowns. Students can use the Shiken app to study alone, or join ‘groups’ to collaboratively tackle a range of fun challenges.

Animated ‘Study Buddy’ characters guide students on their learning journey, with new Buddies and accessories unlocked when progress is made. AI optimises the content for each individual learner and ensures they’re getting feedback, remaining focused, and staying on track to meet their personalised goals. 

The platform has been designed by a team of industry experts. They include a former Headteacher, an NHS doctor, and a graphic designer with expertise in creating mindful content. 

To further support remote learning, schools and tutors can create their own content to publish on the platform. This means that, should students have to return to remote learning, they will have access to engaging, teacher-tailored study materials from their smartphones. 

Nat Al-Tahhan, Creative Director at Shiken, comments:

“This is an incredibly stressful time for students. With many feeling anxious about being back in school or university and getting their learning back on track, we wanted to create a platform that empowers young people to have a less stressful, more enjoyable learning experience. Everything on Shiken – from the questions to the graphics – has been designed with mindfulness and fun at its core. Mindfulness can improve knowledge retention and recall, as well as help reduce stress. We’ve built the perfect partner for students keen to build back their confidence and find the fun in learning once more!”

Patricia Young, a former Headteacher adds:

“Young people are highly adaptable, but this year has been, and continues to be,  incredibly challenging. Many teens are worried about catching up on the learning time lost and achieving the grades they need to fulfil their ambitions. It’s important that they are handed back the control over their learning, and allowed to have some fun while they study. As a former headteacher, I’m convinced that platforms like Shiken will play an important role in tailoring educational support to each student’s needs.” 

ViewSonic Smart LED Projectors are the Go-To solution for Big-Screen Home Entertainment

ViewSonic LED Projectors Grew 30% in the First Half of 2020.
ViewSonic Corp., a leading global provider of visual solutions, announced today its LED projector sales grew
30% in the first half 2020 (Note 1), which is a new milestone for ViewSonic in LED projection. ViewSonic
entered the LED projector segment in 2017 and became one of the world’s top three LED projector brands
within three years. It boasted the fastest growth amongst the top five brands in the overall projector market in
2019 and continued its strong sales performance in the first half of 2020 with year over year growth of 30%.
“LED technology has now progressed to a point where it is an ideal audiovisual solution for all the activities
consumers partake in at home. ViewSonic’s mission is to deliver a feast for the senses at home,” said Dean
Tsai, Head of Projector BU at ViewSonic. “As an innovator and leader in LED projector technology,
ViewSonic is combining its advantages in LED know-how, and consumer insights to bring new smart LED
projectors to market. We are focused on redefining lifestyle-oriented, all-inclusive solutions, from mobile,
outdoor, to home. We want to light the way for more people to enjoy a new flexible big-screen audio-visual
experience in their daily lives.”
ViewSonic LED projectors’ achievements can be attributed to the continued innovation of product
development. ViewSonic began to focus on LED projector development three years ago when the
technology had advanced to an ideal level, aiming to offer consumers a more versatile option. By combining
great visuals and audio into a single, portable projector the M1 was born. Today ViewSonic provides a full
line-up of smart LED projectors for a wide range of applications, including the flagship X series for premium
home entertainment with enhanced smart functionality and the portable M series for an exciting on-the-move
lifestyle, such as the featherlight, 300-gram M1 mini Plus smart pocket cinema projector.
More than just a device, ViewSonic smart LED projectors are an audio-visual solution. ViewSonic smart LED
projectors combine the latest audio-visual technologies with smart integrated functionality and can connect
with mobile devices, home networks, and content services for a seamless viewing experience. Through four
main features – audio-visual excellence, smart capabilities, user-centric design, and eco-friendliness,
ViewSonic smart LED projectors are differentiated to deliver a new enhanced audio-visual experience for
home entertainment.
Audiovisual Excellence
ViewSonic smart LED projectors deliver true-to-life colours by proprietary Cinema SuperColor+™
Technology with 125% Rec.709, and a new level of brightness with industry-leading second-generation LED
technology. To complement their stunning visuals, all ViewSonic smart LED projectors incorporate
professional audio customised by Harman Kardon or JBL. From hardware design to rounds of audio tuning,
each projector has its own customisation to best fit each scenario.
Smart Capabilities
1/2
The smart features include wireless content casting from users’ smart devices via 5GHz Wi-Fi, and intuitive
touch control via their mobile devices as an alternative remote control. Bluetooth connectivity allows users to
broadcast audio from mobile devices with the projectors’ Harman Kardon speakers, or connect to external
Bluetooth headphones to immerse yourself in big-screen fun. Convenient voice control via Amazon Alexa or
Google Assistant, and USB Type-C connectivity offer a fun twist on streaming for direct projection from
phones, tablets, or gaming consoles.
User-Centric Design
ViewSonic places emphasis on user-centric designs to offer consumers the perfect balance of form and
functionality. By creating humanised, lifestyle-oriented products, ViewSonic has won iF Design Awards for
three consecutive years from 2018 to 2020.
Eco-Friendliness
ViewSonic smart LED projectors are more eco-friendly alternatives to other projector types, free from the
toxic mercury found in traditional projector lamps and consume significantly less power for improved
efficiency. LEDs are also a more durable light source than traditional lamps, offering a lifespan of up to
30,000 hours. As a result, it reduces the total cost of ownership.
To find out more about ViewSonic’s smart LED projectors, please visit:
https://www.viewsonicglobal.com/q/pj-new-led.php
Note 1: Source: Futuresource Q2’ 20 World Projector Market Track. The market share is assessed by the
sales volume.
About ViewSonic
Founded in California, ViewSonic is a leading global provider of visual solutions with a presence in over 100
cities around the world. As an innovator and visionary, ViewSonic is committed to providing comprehensive
hardware and software solutions that include monitors, projectors, digital signage, ViewBoard interactive
displays, and myViewBoard software ecosystem. With over 30 years of expertise in visual displays,
ViewSonic has established a strong position for delivering innovative and reliable solutions for education,
enterprise, consumer, and professional markets and helping customers “See the Difference”. To find out
more about ViewSonic, please visit www.viewsonic.com.