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A* line-up of Speakers unveiled for Bett Show

 

THE GODFATHER of growth mindset, Eduardo Briceño, global education campaigner Sarah Brown, and soap actor turned eating disorders charity founder Gemma Oaten are just three of the inspirational voices taking to the stage at January’s Bett Show.

After a one-year hiatus, the world’s most established Edtech event will convene again in London’s ExCeL centre on March 23-25, 2022.

Other high-profile speakers include former Schools Minister Lord Jim Knight who will discuss rethinking pedagogy when faced with tech disruption and Dame Darcey Bussell, the former ballerina and founder of DDMIX, a dance fitness programme designed to help improve student wellbeing.

Attendees will hear from comic actress and writer Sally Phillips, who will participate in a fireside chat, delving into life as a parent to a child with SEND and to discuss inclusion in education. 

Gogglebox cast member, Baasit Siddiqui, whose day job is helping motivate state school pupils through Siddiqui Education, will also share his top tips for how youngsters can confidently pitch ideas for TV shows.

The SLA School Librarian of the Year 2021 – Kristabelle Williams, from Addey and Stanhope School – will reveal how she made the library service at an inner-city school thrive during the pandemic, an achievement that saw her win the coveted title from the School Library Association.

Bett’s theme is “create the future” and the show will look at how education will be transformed beyond the pandemic. 

More than 225 speakers are expected to take to the stage over the three-day event.

Eve Harper, director of the Bett Show said: “Bett prides itself on bringing the leading global voices and pioneers in education transformation each year and as we come together in January to “create the future”, our speaker line up promises just that. We can’t wait to welcome our world-class speakers to Bett and be inspired by their stories, experiences and insights.”

Tickets to the show are free and schools are encouraged to bring students to witness the dozens of speakers, exhibitors and workshops.

Attendees can also take part in CPD training to boost their professional development.

 

BAMEed, a network of schools and teachers across the country, is inviting all attendees to a “takeover event” where leaders will discuss how they are tackling racism and promoting equality in education.

Bett’s After Hours’ programme will also allow plenty of time for networking and socialising after the sun goes down.

This year, a new esports feature will take place at Bett, allowing educators to see how esports is more than gaming and could in fact be the secret weapon in encouraging learning, promoting teamwork and communication.

 

Higher Education leaders will also welcome a new event designed just for them – Ahead by Bett, while global education leaders and change makers can convene at Learnit.

 

Registration is FREE for attendees and is now open now at: https://uk.bettshow.com/visitor-registration?utm_source=media_partner&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=pressrelease01

 

TEACHERS FEAR IT WILL TAKE PUPILS 18 MONTHS OR MORE TO CATCH UP

 

THE learning gap created by the pandemic will take more than 18 months to close, teachers have warned.

 

State school teachers were far more likely to offer a gloomy forecast of how long it would take pupils to catch up compared to teachers in private schools, according to a survey of 4,690 teachers for leading EdTech event, Bett.

 

The survey – carried out by Teacher Tapp – showed that 14 per cent of teachers in private primary schools and 23 per cent of private secondary teachers had not seen a learning gap created by the pandemic.

 

A majority of private secondary school teachers thought that their gap would be closed within 6 months.

 

Just three per cent of teachers in state schools did not think there was a learning gap thanks to Covid19 compared to 19 per cent of private school teachers who thought there was no gap.

 

Some 36 per cent of primary teachers in state schools thought the learning gap would take 18 months or more, while 32 per cent of secondary state school teachers thought the same.

 

Overall, classroom teachers were slightly more pessimistic about how long it would take to close the learning gap than headteachers or members of the senior leadership teams (SLT).

 

Some 32 per cent of teachers at the coalface thought it would take 18 months or more, compared with 31 per cent of SLT and 28 per cent of heads.

 

When analysed by subject, language teachers and Key Stage 2 primary teachers were the most pessimistic, with 34 per cent warning it would take more than 18 months to catch up students. 

 

Some 28 per cent of maths specialist teachers thought it would be more than 18 months, while the figures were nearly the same for English teachers (27 per cent) and humanities (27 per cent) while nearly a third of science teachers – 31 per cent – also warned of the longest time delay.

 

For teachers of early years and Key Stage one in primary, a third warned it would take more than 18 months while 30 per cent of PE teachers and 24 per cent of art and design and technology teachers thought the same.

 

School closures ban

 

Nearly four in ten – 38 per cent – of teachers agree or strongly agree with banning school closures and classing them as ‘essential infrastructure’.

 

The move is proposed by senior Tory MP Rob Halfon, the chairman of the education select committee, who wants school closures to be banned unless they are voted for in parliament. 

 

Mr Halfon has put forward a Private Members’ bill to argue the case, saying that school closures and lockdowns had led to massive gaps in learning and to a safeguarding crisis.

 

Many teachers remain uncertain about the proposed ban, with 29 per cent saying they were unsure whether they backed it.

 

Slightly fewer teachers were against the ban – with 20 per cent disagreeing and 10 per cent strongly disagreeing.

 

Primary school teachers remained marginally more supportive of keeping schools open – with 39 per cent agreeing or strongly agreeing with a ban on future closures, 30 per cent being uncertain, nine per cent strongly disagreeing and 18 per cent disagreeing.

 

Among secondary school teachers, 39 per cent agreed or strongly agreed with a ban on closures while 27 per cent were unsure and a third disagreed or strongly disagreed.

The split was starkest between state and private schools.

 

Private schools were much more likely to want to stay open – with 25 per cent strongly in favour compared with 15 per cent in the state sector.

 

Overall, 48 per cent of private school teachers backed the ban compared to 37 per cent in the state sector.

 

Private primaries were strongly in favour of Mr Halfon’s proposals by 53 per cent compared to state primaries on 38 per cent.

 

Just 37 per cent of state secondary school teachers backed the ban compared to nearly half – 48 per cent – of private secondaries.

 

More state secondary teachers disagreed with the ban – with 34 per cent disagreeing or strongly disagreeing – than private secondary teachers (23 per cent).

 

For private primaries, just 20 per cent opposed the move compared with 28 per cent in state primaries.

 

A further 23 per cent of private school teachers agreed with the ban on closures compared to 22 per cent of state schools,

 

Headteachers were also more likely to be very supportive of keeping schools open – with 42 per cent strongly agreeing or agreeing with an outright ban compared with just 35 per cent of classroom teachers.

 

There were also regional variations, with London schools most in favour of a ban on closures – 40 per cent vs 31 per cent in the East of England. A third of teachers in the East of England disagreed or strongly disagreed with school closures while that figure was 29 per cent in London; 35 per cent in the Midlands, 31 per cent in the North West, 32 per cent in the South East, 30 per cent in the South West and 28 per cent in Yorkshire and the North East.

 

Schools rated as ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted were the most likely to want to stay open – with 38 per cent supporting the proposed ban compared to 34 per cent of schools rated as ‘Good’ and 33 per cent of schools rated as ‘inadequate’ or ‘requires improvement’.

 

Eve Harper, event director, at Bett UK at Hyve Group plc, said: “Our survey shows that teachers are clearly concerned that the learning gap has widened since the pandemic. More teachers think that the Covid catch-up will take 18 months or more. There is also a stark difference in how long state school teachers fear it will take for pupils to recover lost learning compared with private school teachers. Education technology has been pivotal during remote learning and beyond but it is clear that there is a great deal to do to ensure that all students are given the very best opportunity to catch up and that teachers feel well supported in their roles.

 

“Teachers are also marginally in favour of a ban on future school closures, with 40 per cent not wanting schools to close even in the event of a fresh surge of covid or new pandemic, although 29 per cent remained unsure if this would be a good idea.’

 

“The Bett show in March will be the first live event for two years where teachers and school leaders from across the UK and edtech experts from around the globe can discuss how the pandemic has reshaped our classrooms forever and how teachers and learners can maximise the benefit from the innovations that were borne from this crisis.”

 

Acer Brings Windows 11 for Education to its TravelMate B3 and TravelMate Spin B3 Laptops

Acer yesterday announced that it will begin carrying PCs which run on Windows 11 SE, starting with the Acer TravelMate B3 and Acer TravelMate Spin B3 laptops. The portable 11.6-inch laptops were built to survive the school-day, boasting military-grade durability certifications[[i]] and a 10-hour battery life[[ii]], and now come pre-installed with Windows 11 SE or Windows 11 Pro Education. Additionally, the devices’ chassis have been constructed with over 14% post-consumer recycled plastic.

Acer has been working closely with Microsoft in order to provide devices for pilot programs that bring Windows 11 SE to schools around the world. It is one of the first brands to carry devices featuring the new operating system.

Acer TravelMate B3 and Acer TravelMate Spin B3

Featuring the latest Intel® Pentium® Silver and Celeron® processors, the TravelMate B3 and TravelMate Spin B3 are dependable laptops that were built to support the needs of K-12 schoolchildren. The laptops are MIL-STD 810H[[iii]] certified and feature shock-absorbent bumpers, making them tough enough to withstand up to 60 kg (132.28 lbs) of downward force and drops from up to 4 ft (1.22 m). A unique drainage design helps to protect internal components from moderate spills[[iv]]. A mechanically-anchored key design provides a double benefit: The entire keyboard can be easily replaced by administrators, but individual keys are well-secured so that they won’t be dislodged by restless fingers.

 

Durability aside, a number of thoughtful features help the laptops find their place within the classroom. Intel® Wi-Fi 6 (Gig+) with 2×2 MU-MIMO technology helps with connectivity in multi-user environments, and optional 4G LTE provides students with a connection when away from a router. A webcam makes the laptops suitable for taking classes from home, while a 10-hour battery life means that they can make it through the full school day, too. Teachers will appreciate the battery indicator on the device’s front cover, allowing them to tell at a glance if a student’s device needs to be charged.

The Acer TravelMate Spin B3 comes equipped with Acer Antimicrobial Design[1,2] — it features not only an Antimicrobial Corning® Gorilla® Glass[1] touchscreen, but also an antimicrobial (silver-ion) coating on commonly-used high-touch surfaces (including the keyboard, touchpad, and palm-rest surface) to protect these surfaces. Users can further opt to include a dockable Wacom AES pen and 5 MP HDR world-facing camera, allowing schools to customize their laptops in order to suit their students’ specific needs.

Windows 11 SE

A new, cloud-first Windows edition built for inclusive and accessible learning, Windows 11 SE offers the performance and reliability of Windows 11 in addition to a simplified design and modern management tools that have been optimized for low-cost devices in educational settings. Featuring an easy-to-use interface plus an education-first menu of curated apps, Windows 11 SE comes on affordable devices that are pre-configured for student privacy and remote management. And, with a cleaner interface and fewer distractions, Windows 11 SE helps students focus on learning while preserving valuable class time for instruction.

The TravelMate B3 and TravelMate Spin B3 laptops are also available with Windows 11 Pro Education.

More information about Windows 11 SE is available here, or on Microsoft’s Education blog.

 

Pricing and Availability

 

The TravelMate B3 (TMB311-32) will be available in EMEA in Q1’22, starting at EUR 359; and in the UK from £210.

The TravelMate Spin B3 (TMB311R-32) will be available in EMEA in Q1’22, starting at EUR 539 and in the UK from £259.

Exact specifications, prices, and availability will vary by region. To learn more about availability, product specifications and prices in specific markets, please contact your nearest Acer office via www.acer.com.

[i] MIL-STD-810H is a testing protocol conducted in controlled settings and does not guarantee future performance in all situations. Do not attempt to simulate these tests, as damage resulting from this will not be covered by Acer’s standard warranty.

[ii] Battery life claim based on MobileMark 2014. Actual battery life varies depending on product specifications, computer settings and applications or features launched. All batteries’ maximum capacity diminishes with time and use. Battery life varies depending on product model, configuration, power settings and usage, among other factors.
[5]Up to 330 ml (11 fluid ounces) of water

[iii] Sand and Dust testing based on MIL-STD 810F.

[iv] Up to 330 ml (11 fluid ounces) of water

BYJU’S FutureSchool predictions for 2022

Spokesperson: Sajid Shariff, Senior Vice President, Global Growth – BYJU’S.

 

  • Individualised learning:
    • During lockdown, 10% of parents reported paying for private tuition, and we expect this trend to continue as parents look towards 1:1 learning options to supplement school-based curriculum. Offering individualised learning experiences will continue to expand in the private education market. Tailoring education to suit each child’s needs is a proven way to educate and guide students to become creative thinkers, as opposed to a one-size-fits-all approach.

 

  • The impacts of missed learning time:
    • We predict that the missed learning time as a result of the pandemic will continue to impact education into 2022, with children having missed out on a third of education time during lockdown. This means that with children behind on core skills including maths, more parents will be looking for additional support in these areas to bring their children up-to-speed and strengthen their self-confidence.

 

  • Importance of recognising the arts in STEAM:
    • We anticipate an increased need for the arts to integrate with typical STEM subjects to spark opportunities for creative, interactive learning across the board. By using real world conceptual learning methods across arts and science, students can build a greater understanding of how different skills, such as communication, problem solving and creative thinking, come together to make better discoveries. With research showing that STEAM improves creative and critical thinking, placing greater importance on developing skills in the arts, such as musical instruments, will be imperative in cultivating a capable interdisciplinary workforce fit for the future.
    • EdTech companies, like BYJU’S FutureSchool, are responding to this need by offering online music, art and animation lessons, helping reach more children and making the arts more accessible. 

 

  • The continuous rise of coding:
    • With an ever-increasing number of coding jobs available, we need to be teaching the fundamentals of coding and logic from an early age to inspire a passion – and aptitude – for it. Teaching children coding from an early age also helps guide them to become creative thinkers and innovators of tomorrow, and has the added benefit of being an important future skill for children. Parents are finding this value of enrolling their children in coding, with our data showing that out of all the BYJU’S FutureSchool classes available, coding is the most popular with nearly half of parents signing up their children for classes.

  

With teachers under an ever-increasing amount of pressure, more parents are likely to turn to supplemental learning to complement their children’s school education. Online education platforms are expected to become even more accessible, with more people gaining access to technology. Our focus at BYJU’S FutureSchool is to inspire children to create versus consume, helping to prepare children for the future. You can find out more here: https://www.byjusfutureschool.com/

Using EdTech to create seamless in-class learning

Entrepreneur and web developer, Matt Mullenweg, once said technology is best when it brings people together. Technology at its best can also be a teacher’s best friend and an enabler for creating a more seamless and calm learning environment for students. Since the start of the pandemic, EdTech has provided educators with a unique opportunity to breathe a little fresh air into the classroom while dusting away a few age-old cobwebs.

 

We’ve had a chance to rethink teaching and learning – to think outside the box and trial different teaching methods. Good EdTech should support more equilibrium in the classroom, help create a sense of calm and give students a sense of creative freedom and security. Promethean’s sixth State of Technology in Education Report, which asked educators from across the country to share their experiences and priorities, showed that attitudes towards tech use in the classroom remain consistently positive. When asked about using EdTech in the classroom, 77% said they believe EdTech is a great way to engage students, and 76% believe it enables them to do their job better.

 

Using over 20 years of experience working with the education sector, Promethean is committed to ensuring schools can access the very best experience in line with their specific needs and priorities. The award-winning ActivPanel has been designed to deliver innovation and ease-of-use that matters to teachers and students. The ActivPanel is purpose-built to make teaching more seamless and productive while elevating student learning experiences. The intuitive Unified Menu makes access to the most commonly used tools quick and easy, allowing teachers to smoothly navigate and support learning.

 

Giving teachers the support they need and deserve…

 

Whichever EdTech is being used, it should enable teachers to do their jobs better while at the same time helping students to feel more engaged, included and empowered. Promethean’s State of Technology in Education Report showed that teachers feel they are not receiving adequate training and support they need to utilise EdTech effectively, with 55% saying classroom tech training is lacking and 9% claiming that they received no training at all. With budget and time constraints being named as barriers, only 15% of respondents felt they received “full training” when it came to technology. It’s clear that having technology that is easy to use and appropriate training disseminated is crucial. To help address the shortage of EdTech training and make development opportunities more accessible to teachers throughout the UK and Ireland, Promethean created the online CPD platform, Learn Promethean, which provides free and easily accessible training. The platform hosts a wide range of opportunities for developing EdTech skills with over 20 online courses, more than 200 training videos, and over 130 articles and resources.

 

Teachers are able to use the ActivPanel in collaboration with a range of inclusive classroom devices such as tablets and laptops. This means functions such as device mirroring and quizzes that require class participation and provide instant assessment, are simple to deliver. Multi-device mirroring allows teachers to move seamlessly and flexibly around the classroom. The ActivPanel Series comes with a choice of software supplied free as standard, including ActivInspire and ClassFlow. Designed by teachers, for teachers, award-winning ActivInspire software can be used to create and deliver lessons that are interactive and engaging. Teachers can smoothly leverage and enhance existing content and resources while responding to student insights in real time. If a teacher is away from the ActivPanel because they are working at home, using ActivInspire on their laptop to share lessons allows them to save time and avoid any duplication of effort. They are able to record their voice and talk their students through the key learning points as if they were in the classroom.

 

Empowering students…

 

Embracing modern technology is vital for students, who understand that it will inevitably play a key role in their futures – both in their education, careers, and in their personal lives. EdTech helps students to feel more confident and in control, which in turn can support better wellbeing. EdTech acts as an enabler for key student interaction that might not otherwise exist. Inflexible blackboards and chalk now seem like a distant memory. The ActivPanel is not just the teacher’s tool, it’s there for the whole classroom and it represents a unified hub of learning shared by both teacher and students.

 

The State of Technology in Education Report showed that social and emotional learning (SEL) was a top priority for 44% of educators, but only 2% of schools said they will be able to invest in wellbeing for 2022/23. The Promethean ActivPanel encourages collaboration that supports wellbeing in class and can help reduce any feelings of separation or isolation among students. When used appropriately, technology is a great tool for stimulating and inspiring students. Using tools such as polls and quizzes for assessment can increase interactivity and give the classroom an energy boost.

 

Looking to the future…

 

Moving forward, teachers must have the right tools to connect with students in engaging and innovative ways. Educators are confident EdTech is here to stay and will play an important part in the future of teaching and learning. Promethean’s State of Technology Report showed that 61% believe online content and resources will see the biggest growth in the future. Following the last 18 months, 95% believe they are now better equipped for distance learning when needed.

 

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that you can’t get different results by doing things the same way and while the idea of not reinventing the wheel has weight, you have to ask the question how well the wheel is rolling and whether it could benefit from a little realignment. EdTech has gifted educators with a flexibility their predecessors weren’t afforded. Of course, the downside may be no more snow days.

 

To find out more about the ActivPanel and to arrange a demonstration, visit: prometheanworld.com/gb/products/interactive-displays/activpanel

 

 

BYJU’S acquires GeoGebra to make learning maths more visual and interactive

BYJU’S, the world’s leading edtech company, has announced the acquisition of Austrian mathematics learning tool GeoGebra. The company provides a dynamic, interactive, and collaborative programme which will advance BYJU’S aim to make maths more engaging.

 

The acquisition complements BYJU’S overall strategy by enabling the creation of new product offerings and learning formats to enrich its mathematics portfolio. This collaboration will empower BYJU’S to bring comprehensive, personalised and immersive learning experiences to all students.

 

GeoGebra will continue to operate as an independent unit within the BYJU’S group under the leadership of its Founder and Developer, Markus Hohenwarter.

 

Speaking on the acquisition, Anita Kishore, Chief Strategy Officer at BYJU’S, said, “The GeoGebra team has built a powerful and stimulating platform that complements BYJU’S mission of providing impactful learning for students. Designed to improve mathematical understanding, it offers interactive resources that adapt to every child’s style and pace of learning. At BYJU’S, with the help of innovative teaching and technology, we are on a mission to make maths fun, visual, and engaging. By bringing GeoGebra on board, we will continue to further enhance, reimagine and transform the way maths is taught and learned. By combining our strengths, we will be able to offer best-in-class resources to build innovative and exciting next-generation learning formats”, she added.

GeoGebra, with a rapidly expanding community of over 100 million learners across 195+ countries, brings together geometry, algebra, spreadsheets, graphing, statistics and calculus in one easy-to-use format. Mathematical thinking is grounded in visual learning with GeoGebra’s interactive learning environment, which contextualises maths to make it fun. The platform offers engaging geometry and algebra learning tools with a user-friendly interface, which can be either downloaded as an app or used online. The curriculum is available in multiple languages for students around the world.

GeoGebra was born out of a passion to help students learn maths in a visually appealing and engaging way. Our shared passion for learning and teaching resonates with BYJU’S, making them a perfect partner for our onward journey. I am confident that this partnership will help millions of students learn mathematics in an interactive way, helping them overcome their fear of maths and learn to master it,” said Markus Hohenwarter, Founder and Developer of GeoGebra.

 

On a mission to deliver rapid, sustainable growth at scale, Markus, together with Michael Borcherds and Stephen Jull, co-founded their company in 2013 to provide a solid footing for GeoGebra to deliver its long-term vision. GeoGebra includes both an enterprise and philanthropic non-profit organisation. Their commercial services support more than 300 established education service companies and startups, while the non-profit supports students, teachers, researchers, and government agencies across many countries. BYJU’S welcomes the social mission of GeoGebra and acknowledges its importance for mathematics education worldwide, ensuring GeoGebra’s current apps and web services will continue to be available free of charge, putting the power of mathematics into the hands of students and teachers everywhere.

 

Launched in 2015, BYJU’S launched in the UK earlier this year as BYJU’S FutureSchool, bringing its engaging and fun music, maths and coding courses to students across the UK. The virtual courses empower students with life-long skills and encourage them to build a love of lifelong learning and curiosity.

The State of Education Technology…eighteen months on

National survey reveals schools’ top priorities as well as the current barriers to technology in education post-pandemic

A new report, which provides guidance to educators and school leaders on the latest trends in EdTech, has revealed social and emotional learning (SEL), staff training, and collaboration are among schools’ top priorities with budgets and student engagement also being at the forefront of discussion. For the first time in seven years, ‘attainment’ was not first on the list of schools’ priorities.

 

The sixth Promethean® State of Technology in Education UKI Report asked educators from across the country to share their experiences and comment on their schools’ priorities from budgets to strategies and training. Conducted by global education technology company, Promethean, the 1580 participants for the 2021-22 survey included teachers, school SMT, members and IT staff.

 

Social and emotional learning (SEL) was given the top spot by 44 percent of educators, but few believe it will actually feature in next year’s spending. Just two percent of schools said they will be able to invest in wellbeing for 2022/23. Collaboration and communication were reported as the highest priority when it came to technology in the classroom – a dramatic increase and its highest level in five years.

 

Teachers said they are not receiving adequate training and support they need to utilise EdTech effectively, with 55 percent saying classroom tech training is lacking and nine percent claiming that they received no training at all. With budget and time constraints being named as barriers, only 15 percent of respondents felt they received “full training” when it came to technology. The report also highlighted gaps in staff training strategies, with 33 percent of respondents saying teacher training was not a funding priority.

 

The biggest reported hurdle to training was budget. “Lack of budget and lack of time” was outlined by a department head as a preventative force at their North West secondary school, “I do my own training and upskilling in my own time.” This view was echoed in many responses, as time constraints was listed as the second most common roadblock to training. 

 

Still, attitudes towards tech use in the classroom remain consistently positive, with 77 percent believing that EdTech is a great way to engage students, and 76 percent saying it enables them to do their job better. A London primary headteacher commented, “Technology gives us a great opportunity to rethink teaching and learning. We need to have time to take this opportunity rather than rush back to just fulfilling the national curriculum.” 

 

The majority of respondents anticipated that budgets (57 percent) and government policies (50 percent) will influence the future of education more than Covid (at 47 percent) over the next three years. Most respondents (58 percent) also predicted that in the long-term, all classes will be taught in person where possible, with a blend of digital and analogue resources. Regardless, responses did not downplay the lasting effect that the switch to remote learning has had on their school’s EdTech usage, and 95 percent believe they are better equipped for distance learning when needed.

 

Perhaps explaining why Covid came third on the list of future impacts to education, schools no longer need to adapt to accommodate digital learning: “The facilities put in place during the pandemic are now ready to be used whenever required,” said one IT staff member. Another primary head of faculty agreed: “We were well prepared this time – we’re ready should we need to go again!”

 

As for where educators feel the biggest trends are in the future of EdTech:

 

  • 61 percent responded with online content and resources will see the biggest growth in the future
  • 52 percent said online assessments
  • While augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR) was seen as a fad [citation needed].

 

“Responses from our latest survey show not only how important the role of technology in education is, but how we must give greater support to teachers so they may continue to innovate through technology,” said Jim Wallis, Head of UKI Markets at Promethean. “We always try to delve deeper than technology in these reports, to get at the heart of the conditions that educators are facing today. Now it’s time to look at the right tools to help teachers connect to students in engaging ways. We will continue to listen to the voices of educators and strive to inspire through EdTech solutions.”

 

To learn more about the trends identified in the Promethean State of Technology in Education UKI Report 2021/2022, please visit stateofed.tech.

 

The State of Education Technology…eighteen months on

National survey reveals schools’ top priorities as well as the current barriers to technology in education post-pandemic

 

A new report, which provides guidance to educators and school leaders on the latest trends in EdTech, has revealed social and emotional learning (SEL), staff training, and collaboration are among schools’ top priorities with budgets and student engagement also being at the forefront of discussion. For the first time in seven years, ‘attainment’ was not first on the list of schools’ priorities.

 

The sixth Promethean® State of Technology in Education UKI Report asked educators from across the country to share their experiences and comment on their schools’ priorities from budgets to strategies and training. Conducted by global education technology company, Promethean, the 1580 participants for the 2021-22 survey included teachers, school SMT, members and IT staff.

 

Social and emotional learning (SEL) was given the top spot by 44 percent of educators, but few believe it will actually feature in next year’s spending. Just two percent of schools said they will be able to invest in wellbeing for 2022/23. Collaboration and communication were reported as the highest priority when it came to technology in the classroom – a dramatic increase and its highest level in five years.

 

Teachers said they are not receiving adequate training and support they need to utilise EdTech effectively, with 55 percent saying classroom tech training is lacking and nine percent claiming that they received no training at all. With budget and time constraints being named as barriers, only 15 percent of respondents felt they received “full training” when it came to technology. The report also highlighted gaps in staff training strategies, with 33 percent of respondents saying teacher training was not a funding priority.

 

The biggest reported hurdle to training was budget. “Lack of budget and lack of time” was outlined by a department head as a preventative force at their North West secondary school, “I do my own training and upskilling in my own time.” This view was echoed in many responses, as time constraints was listed as the second most common roadblock to training. 

 

Still, attitudes towards tech use in the classroom remain consistently positive, with 77 percent believing that EdTech is a great way to engage students, and 76 percent saying it enables them to do their job better. A London primary headteacher commented, “Technology gives us a great opportunity to rethink teaching and learning. We need to have time to take this opportunity rather than rush back to just fulfilling the national curriculum.” 

 

The majority of respondents anticipated that budgets (57 percent) and government policies (50 percent) will influence the future of education more than Covid (at 47 percent) over the next three years. Most respondents (58 percent) also predicted that in the long-term, all classes will be taught in person where possible, with a blend of digital and analogue resources. Regardless, responses did not downplay the lasting effect that the switch to remote learning has had on their school’s EdTech usage, and 95 percent believe they are better equipped for distance learning when needed.

 

Perhaps explaining why Covid came third on the list of future impacts to education, schools no longer need to adapt to accommodate digital learning: “The facilities put in place during the pandemic are now ready to be used whenever required,” said one IT staff member. Another primary head of faculty agreed: “We were well prepared this time – we’re ready should we need to go again!”

 

As for where educators feel the biggest trends are in the future of EdTech:

 

  • 61 percent responded with online content and resources will see the biggest growth in the future
  • 52 percent said online assessments
  • While augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR) was seen as a fad [citation needed].

 

“Responses from our latest survey show not only how important the role of technology in education is, but how we must give greater support to teachers so they may continue to innovate through technology,” said Jim Wallis, Head of UKI Markets at Promethean. “We always try to delve deeper than technology in these reports, to get at the heart of the conditions that educators are facing today. Now it’s time to look at the right tools to help teachers connect to students in engaging ways. We will continue to listen to the voices of educators and strive to inspire through EdTech solutions.”

 

To learn more about the trends identified in the Promethean State of Technology in Education UKI Report 2021/2022, please visit stateofed.tech.

 

Codelocks releases its third generation KitLock with NetCode

The new KL1000 G3 NetCode allows remote generation of temporary access codes

 

Newbury, UK, 08 December 2021Codelocks announces availability of its new KitLock, the KL1000 G3 NetCode. The new locker lock combines the style and functionality of the popular KL1000 G3 KitLock with the convenience of Codelocks’ NetCode technology – enabling administrators to generate temporary date and time-sensitive access codes.

The KL1000 G3 NetCode can be set up to provide either short or long-term access for users and includes all the features introduced with the KL1000 G3 – including a key override function, easy access to the battery compartment and the option to include Slam Latch for fast ‘push shut’ closure. However, this new addition to the KitLock by Codelocks range boasts Codelocks’ NetCode technology.

The NetCode Function enables lock administrators to generate a single-use code via the online Codelocks Connect Portal or by utilising the Codelocks Connect Application Programming Interface. The code can then be sent by text or email – giving the recipient access to the locker on a specified date and for a set period of time.

Colin Campbell, Managing Director at Codelocks said: “The KL1000 G3 NetCode has been designed through the evolution of our best-selling KitLock, the KL1000, and comes with all the popular features of the KL1000 Classic+. The KL1000 G3 was a hugely popular addition to our KitLock range – so it made sense to add NetCode capability to its existing functions.

“NetCode works by using time and date-based algorithms, synced between the lock and software upon initial programming. WiFi isn’t required – this helps customers to generate NetCodes and manage access control wherever they are, even in the most remote locations.”

Private and Public Functions make it ideal for schools, offices, and leisure facilities where lockers may be allocated on either short or long-term basis, and the NetCode Function makes it perfect for visiting service engineers, delivery personnel and venues where staff might want to grant short-term access via a simple text or email.

KL1000 G3 NetCode has a modern chrome effect finish that reflects the locks surroundings –giving it a slimmer, subtle aesthetic. Customers can choose to add Clean by Codelocks, an optional antibacterial finish which protects against viruses, bacteria, and environmental toxins. The clear coating has been shown to be highly effective at eliminating the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and can reduce bacterial growth by 99.96%*.

The KL1000 G3 NetCode is available now and, shares the same fittings and fixings as the KL1000 Classic+, so existing installations can be easily upgraded and retrofitted.

For more information on KL1000 G3 NetCode, visit www.codelocks.co.uk/g3netcode

 

*Clean by Codelocks is a brand name operated by Codelocks Ltd. to describe products that have been treated with the LumaCleanTM Multipurpose Photocatalytic Coating manufactured by USA Nanocoat “the Manufacturer”. All test results, certifications and claims are those applied for or of the Manufacturer. Clean by Codelocks should not be considered a replacement for an overall cleaning and disinfection strategy. No claim is made or implied that Clean by Codelocks provides infallible protection against agents that may be harmful in part or whole to humans or animals.

Launched today: Schools STEM challenge to build accessible flight simulator

 

The Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) has today launched a new competition, Falcon2, aimed at young people aged 6-19 to design and build an accessible mobile flight simulator.

 

The Falcon2 challenge builds on the success of the previous RAeS build-a-plane challenge which was designed to enable young people to develop and demonstrate key skills which future employers and training providers look for and to learn more about opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) and aviation.

 

Alongside the Royal Aeronautical Society the partners in Falcon2 are Boeing, the disabled flying charity, Aerobility, and Middlesex University.

 

We are today inviting young people aged 6-19 to use their science and engineering skills to design, develop and build a real-life mobile flight simulator which will travel to Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) schools and public events around the UK to introduce people from all backgrounds to the wonder of flight.

 

For many people, the opportunity to fly a plane may seem impossible, particularly to those with disabilities. However, Aerobility has developed a range of programmes and aircraft adaptations that allow many disabled people to do just that – learning to fly an aircraft and gain their pilot’s licence, providing the ultimate feeling of freedom, pride and independence.

 

The challenge is split into two phases:

 

PHASE 1 – The Design Brainstorm Challenge

A poster competition to present design and technology ideas for an accessible flight simulator, with the chance to win prizes for school or youth groups. Prizes include fully funded educational visits and vouchers for schools and groups.

 

There are two age categories for Phase 1 – one for primary ages 6-11 and one for secondary ages 11-19.

 

PHASE 2 – The Big Build

The winning build teams will take on one or more fully funded work packages for the flight simulator, culminating in the final assembly FlightSimCamp at Blackbushe Airport in Hampshire in summer 2023 where teams will integrate the different components which they have worked on into the flight simulator.

 

This phase is open to secondary ages only, and we particularly welcome entries where mainstream schools, colleges or youth groups along with industry representatives team up with SEND schools whether virtually or face-to-face.

 

There are ten work package which break down the flight simulator build into key engineering and technology projects which schools or youth groups can bid for, for example creating accessible seating for the motion platform, visual displays, flight controls or leading the build of a roadworthy trailer to safely transport the simulator around the UK once it is complete.

 

David Edwards FRAeS, Chief Executive of the Royal Aeronautical Society, said,

“Falcon2 is a great opportunity for schools and industry to get involved in a really unusual, but incredibly interesting project. Not only will young people be able to work on and possibly even build a mobile flight simulator, but they will be helping to encourage disabled people to get involved in aviation and change lives.”

 

Prof Mehmet Karamanoglu Head Design, Engineering and Mathematics at Middlesex University, said:

“We are very proud and privileged to be part of the Falcon2 programme. This is such a great project, providing inspiration and opportunity for all to get involved and help those who would not otherwise have the chance to experience the joy of flying. Our team of experts can’t wait to see the new entries and get stuck in to advise and assist the budding engineers, scientists and innovators of tomorrow.”

 

Mike Miller-Smith MBE FRAeS, Chief Executive of Aerobility, said:

“Disabled people don’t always get the chance to access fun and educational activities such as flying a flight simulator. This competition will not only deliver a first-class simulator which will be accessible to all, but all the competition entrants will be considering and learning about inclusive design – a key part of STEM. The Big Build also promises to be great fun!”