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Teach Active launches nationwide campaign to get pupils moving during Maths Week

Teach Active is inviting primary schools to deliver active maths lessons during Maths Week 2020 (9th to 14th November 2020), in a national drive to increase primary school pupils’ activity levels while they are learning. 

As part of the scheme, every primary school teacher can download five free maths lesson plans for their class, one for every day of Maths Week.

The lessons, which combine the learning of maths with movement, are designed to make maths fun and get children moving again after many months of reduced activity as a result of lockdown and other restrictions on activities.

The free resources include a lesson plan for a treasure hunt around the school to find clues, which are maths problems that need to be solved.

There is also a ‘Shark Attack’ lesson, where pupils can only save themselves from a shark attack in the playground by jumping on an island marked out by skipping ropes and displaying a prime number. If they mistakenly jump on an island with an incorrect number, they can only stay in the game if they can correctly explain why the number they stood on is not a prime number.

Ali Oliver MBE, chief executive of children’s charity the Youth Sport Trust which works in partnership with Teach Active, said: “Prioritising physical activity and wellbeing in our schools has never been more important as the nation again experiences localised lockdowns and partial school closures enforced by Coronavirus. We also know there is considerable evidence of the impact of daily physical activity on learning in the classroom and congratulate Teach Active on raising awareness of embedding movement across the curriculum through Maths Week.”  

Jon Smedley, a former teacher and founder of Teach Active said: “Teachers are facing a huge challenge at the moment. Their main priority is to address the learning gap created by school closures, but they are also aware of how important physical activity is to children’s mental wellbeing and their ability to concentrate and learn.

“Active lessons are a great way to target both issues. The lesson plans also make learning a lot more fun which means the knowledge gained sticks with the child.”

The Holy Family Catholic School in Addlestone, Surrey is a user of Teach Active and has found that active lessons change the psychology of learning. Children forget that it’s maths they are learning as they are simply enjoying the lesson. “I love the fact children are proactively channelling their natural competitiveness into maths challenges. They are often learning so many maths concepts without realising they’re doing maths. It’s fabulous to see so many smiling faces as we increase in achievement in the subject,” says Steve Tindall, the headteacher.

Teach Active has been developed by Jon Smedley, a former teacher with over 21 years’ experience in education.  The site offers almost 3500 maths and English active lesson plans and resources for teachers from foundation stage through to year 6 that are closely mapped to the national curriculum.

Teachers wanting to get involved in Maths Week can visit https://www.teachactive.org/maths-week/ and download the free lesson plans.  Resources are available for each year group from reception to year 6.

Participants can also share images or videos of their active maths lessons on Twitter with the handle @TeachActive using #TeachActiveMathsWeek with a chance to win a six month licence to the Teach Active site. 

Become an Education Ambassador School for KidZania London

London, Nov 9th 2020: The UK’s largest indoor edutainment centre, KidZania London has begun the search for three new Education Ambassador Schools. Their role will be to represent KidZania London and promote their unique offering far and wide! 

For the last five years, KidZania London has been supported in its mission to offer hands-on learning experiences outside of the classroom to schools across the UK who were dubbed ‘Ambassador Schools’. Now, KidZania London is on the hunt for three new Ambassador Schools to help support KidZania in its quest to offer the best education experiences it possibly can. 

It’s a fantastic opportunity for Ambassador Schools to promote themselves in conjunction with KidZania London using a range of marketing tactics. As part of the Ambassador Schools programme, KidZania will offer three schools: 

  1. A free class visit during the school calendar year
  2. One free family ticket to KidZania London for use in raffles, fundraisers or charitable effort
  3. Exclusive previews of KidZania’s educational offerings such as workshops or new activities
  4. A discount code for general entry to KidZania London to share with friends, family, and teachers of the school
  5. Each Ambassador school will also receive a logo to help promote their position as an educational partner for use on their website, collateral or at events 

In return, we ask chosen schools to:

  1. Give KidZania permission to film & photograph pupils during visits for use in marketing materials 
  2. Offer testimonials for use on KidZania’s website 
  3. Assist with operational trials 
  4. Become local champions for KidZania and promote their values to help better children’s aspirations
  5. Agree to occasional questionnaires to help improve the experience

Anticipating that these positions will be extremely popular, KidZania is offering the chance for three schools to WIN an exclusive ambassador position for the remainder of the 20-21 school year. 

To be in with the chance of becoming an exclusive KidZania London Ambassador, schools simply need to submit their answer to the following question: ‘‘Why should your school be chosen to become one of KidZania’s Ambassador Schools?” to marketing@kidzania.co.uk. All entries should have the subject line: Schools Ambassador Competition 2020. 

New film reveals what to notify your water company about when planning plumbing work in schools

Did you know that by law there are some types of plumbing work which must be notified to your local water company in advance?

Many owners and managers of buildings such as schools, colleges and other educational institutions are not aware of their legal duties to protect public health when it comes to plumbing.

To help out, WaterSafe, the plumber approval body supported by the UK water suppliers, has produced a short film to make it easier for everyone to understand what is required in England and Wales.

Local water companies review plans for plumbing and can help ensure the plumbing work complies with the Water Fittings Regulations, which are designed to keep the UK’s drinking water supplies fresh, safe and free from contamination.

The need to notify plumbing work at least 10 days in advance of work starting applies to both domestic properties and non-household buildings such as offices, hospitals, schools, care homes and leisure centres.

Julie Spinks, Director of WaterSafe said: “Notifying your local water company is free to do and an essential part of the planning process for plumbing work.

“By notifying you’re also benefitting from a free consultation and building a relationship with your local water company. This in turn provides peace-of-mind that your plans comply with the strict regulations required to install pipes and fittings to supply drinking water.”

On the other hand, failure to notify can result in delays, extra costs to put poor plumbing right and, at worst, contamination of water supplies, a threat to public health and a court prosecution.

WaterSafe’s film clarifies the types of plumbing work that must be notified and gained approval for, before getting started. These are:

  • Building a house or other property/structure
  • Extending or altering the water system on any non-household building
  • A reduced pressure zone (RPZ) valve assembly or similar
  • A water treatment unit which produces wastewater
  • A bidet with an upward spray or flexible hose
  • A bath which holds more than 230 litres of water
  • A pump or booster delivering more than 12 litres of water per minute connected directly or indirectly to a supply pipe
  • A reverse osmosis unit (for purifying water)
  • Any water system outside a building which is either less than 750mm or more than 1,350mm below ground
  • A garden watering system (unless operated by hand)
  • Installing a swimming pool or pond over 10,000 litres
  • Changing the use of a building or installing systems such as rainwater harvesting
  • Any drinking water fountain.

WaterSafe advises employing an approved plumber from its UK register, which is backed by local water companies and the drinking water regulator.

Julie Spinks added: “Plumbers on the WaterSafe register are audited by your local water supplier and also trusted to undertake some of the tasks listed in our film without prior notification – so it makes sense to make WaterSafe your first port of call to avoid delays to your project.”

WaterSafe plumbers can also issue a work-completed certificate to state their work complies with the water regulations, which offers customers a legal defence if something is later found to be wrong.

Watch the film at WaterSafe’s YouTube channel and for more information on the notification process visit watersafe.org.uk/notification.

For more information about WaterSafe and to find an approved plumber, visit watersafe.org.uk

Poor broadband connection in the U.K. hinders online learning, E-learning Index finds

As COVID-19 centres the role of e-learning in education, this study examines the digital infrastructure of 30 countries in the OECD to uncover those best prepared for the digital shift

  • Internet Broadband speed in the U.K. is 67.2 Mbit/s, less than half the speed of the U.S. 
  • The U.K. has 4,281 online education courses, more than France, Germany, Spain, and the Netherlands combined.
  • The U.K. surprisingly ranks fourth for government spending on education per pupil, at 38% of GDP per capita.

The digital learning platform Preply has published a study that examines the technological infrastructure and accessibility in 30 countries worldwide. The state of digital infrastructure, the number of digital educational courses, and the market for e-learning were all analysed to uncover the countries best prepared for a shift to online learning.

School closures as a result of coronavirus exacerbated weaknesses in the U.K.’s digital infrastructure. This study compares the digital infrastructure in the U.K. with other countries worldwide to identify necessary areas for development. Pertinent data was analysed on the state of the nation’s digital infrastructure, digital educational offerings, and the e-learning market to give a comprehensive overview of multiple factors that influence access to e-learning.

“We are convinced that e-learning has a great potential to improve educational opportunities worldwide,” says Kirill Bigai, CEO of Preply. “The coronavirus pandemic has demonstrated that access to digital education is unequally distributed, but that there are ample opportunities to begin investing in the digital infrastructure necessary for a national shift to online learning. This study aims to uncover the extent to which all learners have access to adequate digital tools and resources.”

The U.K. ranks 16th place overall and first place in the index for accessibility to online education with 91.7% of students having access to computers from home. It also has 4,281 distance learning courses, by far the highest in Europe. By comparison, Germany has just 220 and Spain 260. However, the U.K. ranks average in the index for hourly salaries offered to tutors, at £14.60 per hour, compared to £26.56 an hour in Denmark and £17.17 an hour in France. The U.K. is also pulled drastically down in the ranking due to its broadband and mobile download speeds. Broadband speed, for example, stands at 67.2 Mbit/s in the U.K., while France, Spain and Canada, boast internet speeds more than twice as fast.

 Table 1: Top 16 countries with the best conditions for e-learning, with selected factors*

RankCountryAccess to computersInternet- speed Broadband  Tutoring per hourScore
1Norway94.9%127.2 Mbit/s£20.35100.0
2Denmark93.1%141.7 Mbit/s£26.5699.4
3Switzerland90.3%155.9 Mbit/s£26.3395.4
4Luxemburg95.4%114.3 Mbit/s£22.6094.4
5Netherlands97.6%112.8 Mbit/s£16.2684.8
6Sweden92.8%141.7 Mbit/s£15.2679.0
7Austria85.4%56.5 Mbit/s£18.0775.8
8New Zealand80.0%114.8 Mbit/s£15.1573.8
9Finland93.5%91.9 Mbit/s£17.1771.0
10Australia82.4%45.9 Mbit/s£16.4767.7
11Canada85.6%123.3 Mbit/s£14.7766.5
12United States72.0%138.0 Mbit/s£14.2561.1
13Germany92.9%91.3 Mbit/s£9.9460.8
14France84.1%135.2 Mbit/s£17.1757.3
15Hungary79.7%131.2 Mbit/s£6.4852.7
16United Kingdom91.7%67.2 Mbit/s£14.6051.9

 *This list is an extraction of a greater study. A complete overview of all data, methodology and sources can be found at https://preply.com/en/d/e-learning-index/

Further findings: 

  • Mexico offers the worst conditions for e-learning offerings. Only 44.3% of Mexicans have private computer access, and slow internet makes real-time collaboration impossible. 
  • The U.S. offers 9,303 online degree programs and courses that can be taken entirely online, while also providing the greatest variety of digital educational opportunities.
  • Canada offers the best value for money when it comes to internet access. In addition, the Canadian government invests around 31% of GDP per capita in tertiary education. 
  • Internal data from Preply reveals that the biggest market growth last year was in Portugal.
  • Japan ranks surprisingly poorly, in 26th place. The technologically advanced country offers a rich market for e-learning offerings, but sluggish Internet and inadequate digital educational opportunities are holding back the potential for e-learning.

About Preply: Preply is an online learning platform, connecting a global network of tens of thousands of active learners and 15,000 verified tutors to study and teach over 50 languages. With tutor and student matches being made through a machine-learning algorithm, recommended tutors create customised lesson plans to suit the learner’s budget, schedule and current knowledge. To date, students from 150 countries have taken over two million classes from teachers based in 110 countries.

Preply was founded in 2013 by Ukrainian based cofounders Kirill Bigai, Dmytro Voloshyn, and Serge Lukyanov. The company has since raised over USD $15 million and has 145 employees of 25 nationalities working across offices in Kyiv and Barcelona.

Maverick AV Solutions launches Teams Platform training to educators

Woman sit at desk looking at computer screen where collage of diverse people webcam view. Indian ethnicity young woman lead video call distant chat, group of different mates using videoconference app

Distributor Maverick AV Solutions and unified communications specialist Collabtech have joined forces to launch expert training for teachers utilising the Microsoft Teams platform.

David Johnson, general manager at Maverick AV Solutions says;

“Microsoft Teams has become essential for modern learning at all stages of education. Many educators are familiar with the use of Microsoft Office, however the transition to hybrid working requires new skill sets. We have worked with the collaboration specialists at Collabtech to test and develop a set of training sessions for our integrators to deploy rapidly into the education market.”

The course, which will be delivered by the training experts at Collabtech is broken down into five modules starting with a basic introduction to Teams then develops into a full exploration of the platform. Throughout the modules, teachers will learn how to utilise and organise their students, empowering them to create their own methods of education. The final session contains a number of scenarios in which participants apply their knowledge as well as a whole platform review.

Jon Sidwick, President at Collabtech Group talks about his training team; 

“Our entire team are daily users and trained experts of the Microsoft Teams platform. They are ready to work with lecturers, teachers and students to develop regular workflows that are accessible to all levels of education across Europe.” 

The course is being delivered in English, German, Spanish, French and Mandarin. Tutorials are accessed live through a Teams call to maximise usage of the platform and allow participants to ask any questions they have.

Bronagh O’Neill, deputy head at Dagenham Park School, which was the first education establishment to use the training explains;

“The last few months have meant that the integration of Microsoft Teams has been essential to enable the teachers to collaborate and keep the school operating while we are all working remotely. We took this training as a group to enable us to make better use of it as a tool and are passing on our knowledge to the rest of the team.”

By enabling teachers to become confident with the Teams platform, lessons can be presented and work managed more efficiently. This has a direct positive impact on the key performance indicators of students and will help to ensure that hybrid education is a viable and desirable method of teaching. 

The Teams training launch coincides with the launch of a smart learning bundle from Logitech, which enables video collaboration using Microsoft Teams in the classroom, available from Maverick throughout Europe. 

A world first in Cambridge: IB special autism school to open in 2021

The Cavendish School, the world’s first International Baccalaureate (IB) special autism school is set to open on the outskirts of Cambridge in Autumn 2021. Based in Impington, The Cavendish School will also be Cambridgeshire’s first state maintained special free school provision for young people with autism.

Initially admitting up to 40 students in Years 3 to 7, intake at the school will grow year on year, to a maximum capacity of 80 students from Year 3 to 13. The Cavendish School will be accessible and available to many families who cannot be catered for within current state provision in the county.

Ryan Kelsall, Deputy CEO of The Learning Alliance – a new multi-academy trust of which The Cavendish School is a member – said: “We are absolutely thrilled to be able to announce the plans for The Cavendish School to the public. Through our bespoke curriculum and teaching methodology, we will provide the educational environment that young people with autism need to thrive and succeed when their needs cannot be met in a mainstream school.

“The Cavendish School will celebrate diversity and accept, respect and recognise neurological and developmental differences to support each individual student through a differentiated programme that builds and focuses on their skills. Through the knowledge and expertise of The Learning Alliance, The Cavendish School will deliver exemplary education provision for students with Educational Health Care Plans.”

The first of its kind, The Cavendish School will be an IB World School, which means that it will follow the IB programmes and accredited qualifications, alongside specific therapies or interventions as appropriate for individuals. In an ever-changing world, the IB equips students with the skills, confidence and lifelong learning needed to thrive and make a difference. Each of the programme frameworks allows teachers to personalise learning to the unique abilities of their students.

Leah Cooper, Assistant Principal for SEND/PP and SENCo at the co-located Impington Village College, currently seconded to The Cavendish School, said: “Through our IB offering, we will provide our students with the skills and knowledge they need to become globally aware citizens, achieve a range of accredited qualifications and make measurable progress towards their own personal outcomes. Our individualised approach will ensure that we are offering the support and guidance needed to all who study with us, as well as helping families throughout the process. We will be drawing upon the success of our co-located mainstream schools (Impington Village College and Impington International College) to provide excellent opportunities for the students, through shared use of support staff and bespoke extra-curricular activities.”

At the heart of The Cavendish School will be relationships and the important ways in which they can support the growth of each student. Throughout the planning stages for the school, the team has drawn on the latest research into autism and used its expertise in education and experience of working with young people with autism and their families. Beyond high-quality teaching, therapeutic support will be offered, so that all students have full access to the curriculum, to learn and to achieve. The Cavendish School will offer students the opportunity for multidisciplinary support, which will be carefully matched to the explicit needs of the individual student.

Julie Bailey, Chair of Governors at The Cavendish School and doctoral researcher at the Faculty of Education within the University of Cambridge, said: “The Cavendish School aspires to remove the barriers to inclusion and achievement that many young people with autism face in their education. We’ve built on the best of current provision and the very latest research throughout the design and planning stages. The Cavendish School is set to have a transformative impact, giving its pupils an educational environment in which they will thrive.”

Danone’s Eat Like a Champ programme launches updated healthy, sustainable lifestyle resources for primary school pupils

Danone has revitalised it’s popular Eat Like a Champ resources, placing sustainability at the heart of the free, evidence-based healthy eating education programme. Since it’s launch in 2010, the programme has already reached over half a million children in the UK. With the updated content for 2020, Eat Like a Champ aims to engage and educate many more pupils aged 9-10 about both healthy and sustainable lifestyles. Registrations are now open for teachers to download their free resources.


Key Messages:

·The lessons and resources are designed to teach children about healthy, sustainable lifestyles in a fun and exciting way.
 

·The programme is written in collaboration with the the British Nutrition Foundation, British Dietetic Association, and Hubbub.
 

·Registrations for Eat Like A Champ 2020 / 2021 are now open.
 

The six free lesson plans and supporting resources have been developed in consultation with teachers, and the new content is written in collaboration with the British Nutrition Foundation, British Dietetic Association and everyday sustainability experts Hubbub. Topics include healthy eating, food waste, recycling, hydration, climate change and physical activity.

The need for healthier, more sustainable lifestyles has never been greater due to increasing obesity rates and an emerging sense of urgency to tackle climate change in the UK.. The Eat Like a Champ programme aims to support teachers to educate, inspire and engage the next generation to live healthy sustainable lifestyles.

The Eat Like a Champ programme offers readily available, free and unbranded resources aimed at children aged 9-10 years old. The resources are linked to the school curriculum and can be downloaded and delivered in the classroom. Each lesson is designed to last approximately one hour (although can be tailored to fit you and your class’ needs) and is supported with a variety of adaptable and engaging resources, including lesson plans, worksheets, card activities, and PowerPoint presentations.

Christopher Hillman, Head of Sustainability & Social Innovation at Danone UK said: “At Danone we have a vision to bring health through food to as many people as possible. We believe the health of people & the health of the planet are interconnected. Through our updated Eat Like a Champ programme we aim to support the next generation in adopting healthier, more sustainable lifestyles by  empowering them to change their habits and make a positive difference to the world around them”.

Claire Theobald, Education Service Manager at the British Nutrition Foundation said: “It’s important that pupils develop an appreciation of the basics of a healthy, sustainable lifestyle. The Eat Like A Champ lessons provide support to do this in actionable ways. The lessons explore healthy eating and sustainable diets and inspire young people to explore how to stay active for themselves and the planet.”

Sarah Mansfield, a primary school teacher said: “The Eat Like a Champ lesson plans are a great way of bringing the important topics of nutrition and sustainability to primary school pupils. By getting pupils passionate about sustainable eating, they have the opportunity to build healthy and sustainable lifelong habits.”

Quarter of Teachers Have Less Time to Focus on Their Mental Health

Latest research reveals the knock-on effect of virtual learning on mental health issues

In recognition of the incredible challenge ahead, a new mental health course to look after the UK’s educators has launched today and will be available for free for teachers, teaching assistants, support workers and school leaders.

The training will provide education staff with helpful ways to manage their mental health, reduce work-related stress and engage in self-care as one in four teachers stressed that during lockdown and virtual learning, they had less time to concentrate on their own mental health matters compared to during regular term time, a survey* released today from High Speed Training has revealed.

The complimentary course is responding to rising concerns from the industry that not enough importance is given on the subject of mental wellbeing, with almost half (45%) of teachers across the UK stating that they feel unconfident that they have had sufficient training to deal with safeguarding and mental health matters. This coincides with the concerning fact that the large majority (81%) of teachers expect to see an increase in mental health issues amongst pupils this academic year that they will require the ability to cope with.

Catherine Talbot, Education Sector Analyst and Course Lead at High Speed Training, said: “This year has been more turbulent than most and it is clear that teachers will carry the burden of a growing attainment gap and rising safeguarding issues amongst pupils on their shoulders. This overwhelming amount of pressure to continue having a positive impact on young people’s lives, on both an educational and personal front, will undoubtedly have an effect on teachers’ own mental wellbeing across the country. High Speed Training is offering its Mental Health Training for Teachers course for free for a limited time to ensure that teachers feel confident and content in the workplace.”

Corinne Sweet, Psychologist and Psychotherapist, added: “Currently, teachers are under enormous strain as they manage their students’ and their own mental health issues in an extremely challenging situation. Teachers need to be able to deal with their own stresses, strains and pressures as, if they are not coping, they will not be operating at their best. In my experience, I see how those within the education sector can neglect their own mental health badly, due to the pressures to perform and cope with hugely challenging circumstances. Teachers can often put their own needs last, as the workload mounts and now with virtual learning and dealing with the demands of the pandemic, this has added another layer of high stress to what was already an overstretched situation. Resources that seek to help teachers psychologically, like the Mental Health Training for Teachers course, is gold dust at this difficult time.”

The CPD accredited course will be available for free for those within the education sector for a limited time only. For further information regarding High Speed Training’s Mental Health Training for Teachers course, simply visit the website here.

Education world putting more focus on planning compared to six months ago reveals Plandisc

A 32% increase in downloads in the last four weeks is a tangible indicator that planning is back at the top of the agenda according to Plandisc, the world’s first digital, shareable and interactive circular planning tool.  Usage from clients in the education sector has soared a staggering 50% in the “back to school” season. With 60,000 customers across twenty countries, Plandisc originated as a planning tool for schools and it is the education world from primary schools through to colleges and further and higher education bodies which remains by far its biggest fan base. 

Plandisc originated in Denmark where the expression “year wheel” is much used.  Ideal for visualising organisational flow and generating transparency to break down departmental siloes that can hinder progress, year wheels make it easy to involve multiple groups and stakeholders. At its simplest, having the overview ensures that classes, timetables and event schedules do not clash and for education establishments wanting to function at the highest possible professional level, the evaluation module ensures that mistakes do not reoccur.   

It saves time for the school as a whole and Plandisc customer feedback shows that administration time is reduced by about 2 hours per teacher or academic member of staff (per annum). “Plandisc is ideal for starting to (re-) plan activities/tasks/meetings in a still semi-virtual world. The need for coordination and visualization and mapping of elements across a school or educational establishment is going to be huge to avoid overlapping activities and stressing the organisation unnecessarily” explains Torben Stigaard.    

Plandisc is compatible with Microsoft Teams and Sharepoint and the synchronisation between Outlook and Plandisc means that important meetings and events can be transferred across in a few clicks, so no “copy and pasting” required with changes appearing both in Outlook and the Plandisc at the same time.  Typically embedded on an organisation’s intranet to make it accessible to all staff, the circular overview helps coordinate plans between academic departments as well as sports, events and marketing activity.  With a circular view, it is easy to spot overlapping activities and make sure that staff meetings, parent days and virtual open days for example are distributed evenly throughout the year. As Stigaard explains “Sharing information via Plandisc in business as usual times avoids last-minute changes of plans and extra workload but now, with so much activity that was paused during lockdown needing to restart, there is even more need for better planning as an educational establishment cannot suddenly implement all paused activity at the same time whilst still having the flexibility update plans easily and efficiently as circumstances change.” 

Plandisc is intuitive and for schools, colleges, universities wanting to test it out, is free to use for one user creating up to three Plandiscs and is easy to get started as there are a number of templates on its website to choose from: https://plandisc.com/en/circular-calendar-templates/ Packages include a Premium account for just £130  a year which provides 10 Plandiscs and a Business version with unlimited Plandiscs for £160 a year. 

Outside the education world, Plandisc is used by all kinds of organisations and it now has over 60,000 users in twenty countries and twenty sectors from churches in the US to fashion companies in the Nordics and multi-nationals. 

MakerBot Releases New Report on Trends in 3D Printing and STEAM Education

Report underscores the use of 3D printing as a learning tool to drive engagement with students and help them develop critical thinking, problem-solving, and design thinking skills
BROOKLYN, N.Y., October 16, 2020MakerBot, a global leader in 3D printing and subsidiary of Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq: SSYS), today released its latest report, “Trends in 3D Printing and STEAM Education.” Based on over 1,000 responses from education professionals around the world, the report illustrates the use of 3D printing in education and how it is applied across grade levels among respondents.    Key findings from the report reveal that 63% of respondents use 3D printing to better prepare their students for the workforce, but they want more than just a 3D printer in order to be successful—respondents want a full ecosystem of 3D printing resources in order to achieve their educational goals. 65% of respondents cited that online training programs would help them to implement the technology better, while 63% and 56% of respondents also cited lesson plans and educational webinars as useful 3D printing resources, respectively.    Nadav Goshen, CEO of MakerBot, noted, “We are at a pivotal moment in education. We have seen the use of 3D printing in education increase steadily over the past years due, in part, to the availability of more products and services geared toward teachers and students. Affordable and easy-to-use 3D printers, training and certification programs, integrated lesson plans, and online 3D printing resources have made the technology attractive to many educational institutions. In addition, working with 3D printers can help students develop practical and usable skills that can be used outside of the classroom.”   Additional key findings from the Trends in 3D Printing and STEAM Education report include: Authentic learning experiences are becoming a popular new teaching method. Design-based learning (57%), integrated learning (51%), and collaborative learning (49%) were identified as the top teaching methods among respondents. Only 42% of respondents stated that they still use traditional learning settings with students. Teaching STEAM subjects requires resources that schools may not have. Budget constraints (56%), insufficient equipment (45%), and lack of technical training (39%) were cited as the top challenges to teaching STEAM subjects. 3D printing is widely used to develop practical skills that can be used beyond the classroom. Respondents cited developing problem-solving skills (63%), skill sets for future careers (63%), and creative thinking skills (63%) as their top reasons for 3D printing adoption. Educators want more than just a 3D printer. They want a full 3D printing ecosystem. 82% of respondents cited 3D printing resources (i.e., lesson plans, training programs, etc.) as important factors when choosing a 3D printer.  Costs, reliability, and ease-of-use play important roles in decision-making. 95% of respondents rated reliability as an important benefit, while 90% said ease-of-use was important and 89% said costs were important.   “The importance of 3D printing in education cannot be overstated. The report revealed the shift from traditional learning environments to more interactive and engaging approaches. By teaching visualization, design and creation via 3D printing, 3D printing opens up opportunities for students and brings ideas to life,” added Goshen. 

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