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Attainment drops across all primary school years in England, with seven-year-olds most impacted

Pupils eligible for pupil premium disproportionately affected by Covid-19 school closures, as attainment gap increases

New data ontest resultsin maths, reading, grammar, punctuation and spelling show that attainment has dropped across all subjects and year groups in 2020. The data on over 250,000 primary school pupils across England is based on widely used tests by RS Assessment from Hodder Education, with insights provided by education data analytics company SchoolDash. The tests show the most significant decreases in maths papers, while Year 3 and 2 pupils faced the steepest drop-off of any cohort.

The data shows an average standardised score decline of 8 points in maths, 6.3 in reading and 7.2 in grammar, punctuation and spelling across all pupils compared to 2019 data, with greater reductions seen for pupil premium eligible pupils. This is a stark contrast to the average annual gains of 0.5 points since the current curriculum began in 2016. The tests were scheduled to take place during the summer term; however, pupils sat them four months later, at the beginning of this autumn term, due to the school closures.

Students eligible for the pupil premium face steepest attainment drop

The attainment gap between pupils eligible for pupil premium and those who are not has widened significantly. Across all three standardised subject papers offered by RS Assessment and all six year-groups, those eligible for pupil premium experienced a steeper decline in standardised scores than other pupils. There are also considerable differences by school type. Those with higher levels of deprivation, situated in urban areas or located in the north or midlands, tended to show more significant declines.

Among Year 2 pupils – who are between six and seven years old – those eligible for pupil premium dropped by an additional 2.4 points compared with their peers in maths, and an additional 2.3 points in reading. Pupil premium eligible pupils in Year 6 were most affected in grammar, punctuation and spelling, dropping an additional 1.4 points beyond their classmates.

The least difference between pupils eligible for pupil premium and others were seen in Year 3 maths, a difference of 0.8 points; Year 5 reading at 0.5 points; and Year 4 grammar, punctuation and spelling, where pupil premium eligible pupils were just 0.6 points behind their peers.

Biggest attainment drops across all pupils

Beyond the significant overall drops in subjects, notable differences were also seen between topics within subjects. For example, attainment in fractions was affected more than number, while punctuation fared worse than spelling.

In maths, fractions and geometry topics were the most affected, with attainment dropping by 14 percent across all year groups. Meanwhile, operations and statistics dropped by 12 percent, measures by 9 percent, and number by 8 percent.

In the grammar, punctuation and spelling tests, punctuation was hardest hit with an average 14 percent drop in attainment. Grammar followed closely behind, dropping 13 percent, followed by vocabulary at 11 percent and spelling at 10 percent.

For the reading tests, comprehension dropped by 10 percent across all years, while inference decreased by 9 percent and Language, Structure and Presentation (LSP) by 10 percent. The Year 1s taking the Reception paper also showed concerning drops in attainment. Comprehension scores decreased an average of 15 percent, phonics attainment dropped by 16 percent and Reading for Meaning (RFM) lost 14 percent.

Katie Blainey, Publishing Director at RS Assessment, says: “This year, more than ever, it is important we use every resource we have to quickly understand what impact school closures may have had on attainment across the country. By providing this detailed analysis of primary test results from the first six weeks of the autumn term, we hope to provide evidence to help focus support to help those children most affected by the closures. There have clearly been significant impacts on learning, but not all children have been affected equally, so we hope this analysis will help to work towards a fairer start in life for all pupils, regardless of background. That’s a fundamental and guiding principle of the work we do at RS Assessment from Hodder Education, and of each primary school in the country.”

Download the full report here.

NEW STUDY REVEALS SHORTAGE IN MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS SKILLS WITHIN EDUCATION SECTOR

  • Mental health awareness is one of the most sought-after skills in the education and early years sector due to COVID-19 pandemic – according to new skills and employment trends report
  • Mental Health awareness was listed within 15,000 education and early learning job postings since the start of COVID-19 lockdown
  • Online learning provider, The Skills Network, is now calling for schools to add mental health learning onto the curriculum following rise in skills-gap

A skills and employment trends report* published today (11 November) by The Skills Network, in partnership with Emsi, has highlighted a mental health awareness skills gap in the education and early learning sector, due to COVID-19 pandemic.

With 71% of early years staff furloughed between March and August 2020, and 11% made redundant, online learning provider, The Skills Network, has issued a report to highlight the top 10 skills*** in demand across the sector.

By analysing 1.5 million job adverts between March and September 2020, The Skills Network report published, in partnership with Emsi, has highlighted welfare, autism, child protection, mental health and auditing, amongst the top 10 most in demand skills in the education and early years sector.

Mark Dawe, Chief Executive from The Skills Network, is now calling for schools across the country to add mental health learning onto the curriculum to help close this growing skills gap. He said: “Being able to identify and address mental health is a growing requirement for staff in the education and early learning sector. With half of mental health problems beginning by age 14, it is clear why understanding mental health is currently the seventh most demanded skill for early years and educational roles.

“Both teachers and support staff play a significant role in tackling mental health issues within the classroom, and mental health training can equip today’s candidates with the right tools to help children experiencing personal problems.

“With many employers across all industries now looking for employees to have mental health awareness, we’d urge schools and learning providers to look to improve the current curriculum, and to ensure that education around mental health is being offered.”

To assist those looking to discover the most in-demand skills in their local area, The Skills Network has also developed an online app, which will provide a personalised list of the top 15 sought-after skills and roles available in your postcode area.

Mark Dawe continues: “At The Skills Network, we offer distance learning, as a way of learning remotely without attending lessons in a classroom or having regular face to face contact with a Tutor. We’d urge any employers looking to upskill their current team to consider online training.”

Andy Durman, Managing Director of EMSI UK, added: “The huge disruption to the economy this year has revealed a number of new labour market challenges, such as the widening skills gap and increased automation. We need to better understand exactly what skills employers are demanding, and how this is changing over the period of economic upheaval and beyond.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with The Skills Network to bring some of our data and insight to these issues, helping to shine a light on changing employer demand for occupations, job roles and skills in various critical sectors throughout the country.”

To access the full skills and employment trends report, or to review the online courses available – please visit www.theskillsnetwork.com.

Teach Active launches nationwide campaign to get pupils moving during Maths Week

Teach Active is inviting primary schools to deliver active maths lessons during Maths Week 2020 (9th to 14th November 2020), in a national drive to increase primary school pupils’ activity levels while they are learning. 

As part of the scheme, every primary school teacher can download five free maths lesson plans for their class, one for every day of Maths Week.

The lessons, which combine the learning of maths with movement, are designed to make maths fun and get children moving again after many months of reduced activity as a result of lockdown and other restrictions on activities.

The free resources include a lesson plan for a treasure hunt around the school to find clues, which are maths problems that need to be solved.

There is also a ‘Shark Attack’ lesson, where pupils can only save themselves from a shark attack in the playground by jumping on an island marked out by skipping ropes and displaying a prime number. If they mistakenly jump on an island with an incorrect number, they can only stay in the game if they can correctly explain why the number they stood on is not a prime number.

Ali Oliver MBE, chief executive of children’s charity the Youth Sport Trust which works in partnership with Teach Active, said: “Prioritising physical activity and wellbeing in our schools has never been more important as the nation again experiences localised lockdowns and partial school closures enforced by Coronavirus. We also know there is considerable evidence of the impact of daily physical activity on learning in the classroom and congratulate Teach Active on raising awareness of embedding movement across the curriculum through Maths Week.”  

Jon Smedley, a former teacher and founder of Teach Active said: “Teachers are facing a huge challenge at the moment. Their main priority is to address the learning gap created by school closures, but they are also aware of how important physical activity is to children’s mental wellbeing and their ability to concentrate and learn.

“Active lessons are a great way to target both issues. The lesson plans also make learning a lot more fun which means the knowledge gained sticks with the child.”

The Holy Family Catholic School in Addlestone, Surrey is a user of Teach Active and has found that active lessons change the psychology of learning. Children forget that it’s maths they are learning as they are simply enjoying the lesson. “I love the fact children are proactively channelling their natural competitiveness into maths challenges. They are often learning so many maths concepts without realising they’re doing maths. It’s fabulous to see so many smiling faces as we increase in achievement in the subject,” says Steve Tindall, the headteacher.

Teach Active has been developed by Jon Smedley, a former teacher with over 21 years’ experience in education.  The site offers almost 3500 maths and English active lesson plans and resources for teachers from foundation stage through to year 6 that are closely mapped to the national curriculum.

Teachers wanting to get involved in Maths Week can visit https://www.teachactive.org/maths-week/ and download the free lesson plans.  Resources are available for each year group from reception to year 6.

Participants can also share images or videos of their active maths lessons on Twitter with the handle @TeachActive using #TeachActiveMathsWeek with a chance to win a six month licence to the Teach Active site. 

Become an Education Ambassador School for KidZania London

London, Nov 9th 2020: The UK’s largest indoor edutainment centre, KidZania London has begun the search for three new Education Ambassador Schools. Their role will be to represent KidZania London and promote their unique offering far and wide! 

For the last five years, KidZania London has been supported in its mission to offer hands-on learning experiences outside of the classroom to schools across the UK who were dubbed ‘Ambassador Schools’. Now, KidZania London is on the hunt for three new Ambassador Schools to help support KidZania in its quest to offer the best education experiences it possibly can. 

It’s a fantastic opportunity for Ambassador Schools to promote themselves in conjunction with KidZania London using a range of marketing tactics. As part of the Ambassador Schools programme, KidZania will offer three schools: 

  1. A free class visit during the school calendar year
  2. One free family ticket to KidZania London for use in raffles, fundraisers or charitable effort
  3. Exclusive previews of KidZania’s educational offerings such as workshops or new activities
  4. A discount code for general entry to KidZania London to share with friends, family, and teachers of the school
  5. Each Ambassador school will also receive a logo to help promote their position as an educational partner for use on their website, collateral or at events 

In return, we ask chosen schools to:

  1. Give KidZania permission to film & photograph pupils during visits for use in marketing materials 
  2. Offer testimonials for use on KidZania’s website 
  3. Assist with operational trials 
  4. Become local champions for KidZania and promote their values to help better children’s aspirations
  5. Agree to occasional questionnaires to help improve the experience

Anticipating that these positions will be extremely popular, KidZania is offering the chance for three schools to WIN an exclusive ambassador position for the remainder of the 20-21 school year. 

To be in with the chance of becoming an exclusive KidZania London Ambassador, schools simply need to submit their answer to the following question: ‘‘Why should your school be chosen to become one of KidZania’s Ambassador Schools?” to marketing@kidzania.co.uk. All entries should have the subject line: Schools Ambassador Competition 2020. 

Signature Masks – Supporting Brits through lockdown

Signature Masks is doing its bit to support Brits through lockdown 2.0 by reducing the cost of its face
coverings to ensure that everyone can stay protected when making essential trips outside the home.
The UK-based company, founded by 19-year-old student James Eid, is selling its Grab & Go Bundle of
20 face coverings, 5 alcohol wipes and hand sanitiser for £9.99, down from £11.50, and a 25 box of
biscotti coloured coverings for £9.99, down from £12.49.
In order to take the stress out of running out, the brand offers a weekly subscription service at the
click of a button, so when you’re getting low another box will arrive with no thought needed.
Consumers can now save 12.5% when subscribing, with a 10 pack of Biscotti, Roasted Coffee or High
Filtration coverings available for £3.49, down from £3.99.
James Eid founded the company at the beginning of lockdown when he struggled to find affordable
masks to visit his grandmother who suffers from Bechet’s disease.
All Signature Masks are 3-ply which have been found to be more effective than single-ply coverings,
are water resistant and have nose wires to create a snug fit and help reduce glasses fogging up.
James has previously donated 3,000 masks to The Felix Project which helps feed local communities in
London and teamed up with a local Lebanese community in London to send 3,500 Signature Masks to
the relief effort in Beirut.
Head to signaturemasks.co.uk and get yours today.
Signature Masks are also available on Amazon in coffee, biscotti and high filtration for £4.99 for 10.

Poor broadband connection in the U.K. hinders online learning, E-learning Index finds

As COVID-19 centres the role of e-learning in education, this study examines the digital infrastructure of 30 countries in the OECD to uncover those best prepared for the digital shift

  • Internet Broadband speed in the U.K. is 67.2 Mbit/s, less than half the speed of the U.S. 
  • The U.K. has 4,281 online education courses, more than France, Germany, Spain, and the Netherlands combined.
  • The U.K. surprisingly ranks fourth for government spending on education per pupil, at 38% of GDP per capita.

The digital learning platform Preply has published a study that examines the technological infrastructure and accessibility in 30 countries worldwide. The state of digital infrastructure, the number of digital educational courses, and the market for e-learning were all analysed to uncover the countries best prepared for a shift to online learning.

School closures as a result of coronavirus exacerbated weaknesses in the U.K.’s digital infrastructure. This study compares the digital infrastructure in the U.K. with other countries worldwide to identify necessary areas for development. Pertinent data was analysed on the state of the nation’s digital infrastructure, digital educational offerings, and the e-learning market to give a comprehensive overview of multiple factors that influence access to e-learning.

“We are convinced that e-learning has a great potential to improve educational opportunities worldwide,” says Kirill Bigai, CEO of Preply. “The coronavirus pandemic has demonstrated that access to digital education is unequally distributed, but that there are ample opportunities to begin investing in the digital infrastructure necessary for a national shift to online learning. This study aims to uncover the extent to which all learners have access to adequate digital tools and resources.”

The U.K. ranks 16th place overall and first place in the index for accessibility to online education with 91.7% of students having access to computers from home. It also has 4,281 distance learning courses, by far the highest in Europe. By comparison, Germany has just 220 and Spain 260. However, the U.K. ranks average in the index for hourly salaries offered to tutors, at £14.60 per hour, compared to £26.56 an hour in Denmark and £17.17 an hour in France. The U.K. is also pulled drastically down in the ranking due to its broadband and mobile download speeds. Broadband speed, for example, stands at 67.2 Mbit/s in the U.K., while France, Spain and Canada, boast internet speeds more than twice as fast.

 Table 1: Top 16 countries with the best conditions for e-learning, with selected factors*

RankCountryAccess to computersInternet- speed Broadband  Tutoring per hourScore
1Norway94.9%127.2 Mbit/s£20.35100.0
2Denmark93.1%141.7 Mbit/s£26.5699.4
3Switzerland90.3%155.9 Mbit/s£26.3395.4
4Luxemburg95.4%114.3 Mbit/s£22.6094.4
5Netherlands97.6%112.8 Mbit/s£16.2684.8
6Sweden92.8%141.7 Mbit/s£15.2679.0
7Austria85.4%56.5 Mbit/s£18.0775.8
8New Zealand80.0%114.8 Mbit/s£15.1573.8
9Finland93.5%91.9 Mbit/s£17.1771.0
10Australia82.4%45.9 Mbit/s£16.4767.7
11Canada85.6%123.3 Mbit/s£14.7766.5
12United States72.0%138.0 Mbit/s£14.2561.1
13Germany92.9%91.3 Mbit/s£9.9460.8
14France84.1%135.2 Mbit/s£17.1757.3
15Hungary79.7%131.2 Mbit/s£6.4852.7
16United Kingdom91.7%67.2 Mbit/s£14.6051.9

 *This list is an extraction of a greater study. A complete overview of all data, methodology and sources can be found at https://preply.com/en/d/e-learning-index/

Further findings: 

  • Mexico offers the worst conditions for e-learning offerings. Only 44.3% of Mexicans have private computer access, and slow internet makes real-time collaboration impossible. 
  • The U.S. offers 9,303 online degree programs and courses that can be taken entirely online, while also providing the greatest variety of digital educational opportunities.
  • Canada offers the best value for money when it comes to internet access. In addition, the Canadian government invests around 31% of GDP per capita in tertiary education. 
  • Internal data from Preply reveals that the biggest market growth last year was in Portugal.
  • Japan ranks surprisingly poorly, in 26th place. The technologically advanced country offers a rich market for e-learning offerings, but sluggish Internet and inadequate digital educational opportunities are holding back the potential for e-learning.

About Preply: Preply is an online learning platform, connecting a global network of tens of thousands of active learners and 15,000 verified tutors to study and teach over 50 languages. With tutor and student matches being made through a machine-learning algorithm, recommended tutors create customised lesson plans to suit the learner’s budget, schedule and current knowledge. To date, students from 150 countries have taken over two million classes from teachers based in 110 countries.

Preply was founded in 2013 by Ukrainian based cofounders Kirill Bigai, Dmytro Voloshyn, and Serge Lukyanov. The company has since raised over USD $15 million and has 145 employees of 25 nationalities working across offices in Kyiv and Barcelona.

Maverick AV Solutions launches Teams Platform training to educators

Woman sit at desk looking at computer screen where collage of diverse people webcam view. Indian ethnicity young woman lead video call distant chat, group of different mates using videoconference app

Distributor Maverick AV Solutions and unified communications specialist Collabtech have joined forces to launch expert training for teachers utilising the Microsoft Teams platform.

David Johnson, general manager at Maverick AV Solutions says;

“Microsoft Teams has become essential for modern learning at all stages of education. Many educators are familiar with the use of Microsoft Office, however the transition to hybrid working requires new skill sets. We have worked with the collaboration specialists at Collabtech to test and develop a set of training sessions for our integrators to deploy rapidly into the education market.”

The course, which will be delivered by the training experts at Collabtech is broken down into five modules starting with a basic introduction to Teams then develops into a full exploration of the platform. Throughout the modules, teachers will learn how to utilise and organise their students, empowering them to create their own methods of education. The final session contains a number of scenarios in which participants apply their knowledge as well as a whole platform review.

Jon Sidwick, President at Collabtech Group talks about his training team; 

“Our entire team are daily users and trained experts of the Microsoft Teams platform. They are ready to work with lecturers, teachers and students to develop regular workflows that are accessible to all levels of education across Europe.” 

The course is being delivered in English, German, Spanish, French and Mandarin. Tutorials are accessed live through a Teams call to maximise usage of the platform and allow participants to ask any questions they have.

Bronagh O’Neill, deputy head at Dagenham Park School, which was the first education establishment to use the training explains;

“The last few months have meant that the integration of Microsoft Teams has been essential to enable the teachers to collaborate and keep the school operating while we are all working remotely. We took this training as a group to enable us to make better use of it as a tool and are passing on our knowledge to the rest of the team.”

By enabling teachers to become confident with the Teams platform, lessons can be presented and work managed more efficiently. This has a direct positive impact on the key performance indicators of students and will help to ensure that hybrid education is a viable and desirable method of teaching. 

The Teams training launch coincides with the launch of a smart learning bundle from Logitech, which enables video collaboration using Microsoft Teams in the classroom, available from Maverick throughout Europe. 

EDUCATION INVESTOR AWARDS 2020: DISCOVERY EDUCATION ANNOUNCED AS GRAND PRIX FINALIST

Digital learning provider shortlisted for ‘Ed Tech Firm of the Year’ industry prize

Discovery Education, the global leader in curriculum-aligned digital resources and professional learning for primary and secondary schools, has been announced as a finalist at this year’s prestigious Education Investor Awards.

Organised by Education Investor Global, the awards are a flagship industry event celebrating excellence in the business of UK education. This year they also recognise how firms have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic and maintained innovation and growth during a challenging period for the sector.

Discovery Education is proud to be nominated for the prestigious Grand Prix, as a contender for Ed Tech Firm of the Year.

Robin Headlee, Managing Director of Discovery Education International, said:

“We’re delighted to be shortlisted for this prestigious industry prize, which recognises our efforts to provide continuity of learning for millions of students during the pandemic. From providing no-cost access to our award-winning digital resources to developing new apps to facilitate social distancing, Discovery Education mobilised its Covid-19 response quickly and effectively to support students, teachers and parents around the world.”

During the initial Covid-19 pandemic school closures, Discovery Education served its base of 45 million existing students, as well as millions more learners needing immediate support, ensuring that learning can continue, wherever students are located.  Discovery Education has also provided extensive support for educators, with professional learning events dedicated to providing educators strategies they can use to continue student learning during the pandemic.

Howard Lewis, Discovery Education’s UK Managing Director said:

“Discovery Education is committed to supporting students, teachers and parents as they navigate the challenges of this global pandemic. Maintaining continuity of learning is our priority and we’ve introduced a whole range of measures – including home access to our award-winning Espresso service – to help students access dynamic digital content and stay engaged and motivated, wherever they are based. ”

For more information about Discovery Education’s digital resources and professional learning services visit www.discoveryeducation.co.uk and stay connected via Twitter and LinkedIn.

TOP SPEAKING LINE-UP CONFIRMED FOR INAUGURAL EDTECH SUMMIT

An impressive line-up of speakers has been finalised ahead of the inaugural EdTech Summit, which will be taking place online on the 18th and 19th November. The event will be run alongside the bi-annual Schools & Academies Show (17th-20th November), the UK’s largest education policy event organised by GovNet.

Gillan Keegan MP, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Apprenticeships and Skills at the Department for Education, will open proceedings with a keynote presentation on the status of apprenticeships whilst updating the audience on the measures put in place to mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19 on young people’s careers. She will be joined in the opening session by Dr Daniel Susskind, Career Development Fellow from University of Oxford, exploring the future of work in light of the ongoing pandemic.

A 65-strong speaking line-up also includes Helen Miller OBE, Chief Executive of the Good Things Foundation, Robin Ghurbhurun, Managing Director of UK Further Education and Skills, Prof. Mark Simpson, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Leading and Teaching) at Teesside University, and Lauren Thorpe, Director of Strategies at Ark. 

This virtual event will also enable education technologists, senior industry leaders and pioneering speakers to come together to discuss how to bridge the gap between education and technology through an innovative online networking platform. More than 750 senior ICT executives and 3,000 leaders from across the education sector have already signed up for the summit, which is being supported by multiple EdTech suppliers. 

Chris Callaghan, Event Director, EdTech Summit, said: “Whilst we are disappointed this launch event is not taking place at the NEC Birmingham as planned, due to COVID-19 restrictions, the level of support we have received to transform the inaugural EdTech Summit into a virtual event has been astounding – which clearly illustrates what an innovative and digitally-minded sector we are working with. 

“Despite this change, we have assembled an inspiring and authoritative line-up of speakers who will provide vital updates and share best practice. The EdTech Summit is the only event in the UK to focus on helping primary and secondary schools, colleges, and universities to optimise their digital strategies, implement new technologies and drive efficiencies in the classroom and the back office.” 

For more information about the EdTech Summit, or to register for the event, please visit the official website – https://edtechsummit.co.uk/ 

A world first in Cambridge: IB special autism school to open in 2021

The Cavendish School, the world’s first International Baccalaureate (IB) special autism school is set to open on the outskirts of Cambridge in Autumn 2021. Based in Impington, The Cavendish School will also be Cambridgeshire’s first state maintained special free school provision for young people with autism.

Initially admitting up to 40 students in Years 3 to 7, intake at the school will grow year on year, to a maximum capacity of 80 students from Year 3 to 13. The Cavendish School will be accessible and available to many families who cannot be catered for within current state provision in the county.

Ryan Kelsall, Deputy CEO of The Learning Alliance – a new multi-academy trust of which The Cavendish School is a member – said: “We are absolutely thrilled to be able to announce the plans for The Cavendish School to the public. Through our bespoke curriculum and teaching methodology, we will provide the educational environment that young people with autism need to thrive and succeed when their needs cannot be met in a mainstream school.

“The Cavendish School will celebrate diversity and accept, respect and recognise neurological and developmental differences to support each individual student through a differentiated programme that builds and focuses on their skills. Through the knowledge and expertise of The Learning Alliance, The Cavendish School will deliver exemplary education provision for students with Educational Health Care Plans.”

The first of its kind, The Cavendish School will be an IB World School, which means that it will follow the IB programmes and accredited qualifications, alongside specific therapies or interventions as appropriate for individuals. In an ever-changing world, the IB equips students with the skills, confidence and lifelong learning needed to thrive and make a difference. Each of the programme frameworks allows teachers to personalise learning to the unique abilities of their students.

Leah Cooper, Assistant Principal for SEND/PP and SENCo at the co-located Impington Village College, currently seconded to The Cavendish School, said: “Through our IB offering, we will provide our students with the skills and knowledge they need to become globally aware citizens, achieve a range of accredited qualifications and make measurable progress towards their own personal outcomes. Our individualised approach will ensure that we are offering the support and guidance needed to all who study with us, as well as helping families throughout the process. We will be drawing upon the success of our co-located mainstream schools (Impington Village College and Impington International College) to provide excellent opportunities for the students, through shared use of support staff and bespoke extra-curricular activities.”

At the heart of The Cavendish School will be relationships and the important ways in which they can support the growth of each student. Throughout the planning stages for the school, the team has drawn on the latest research into autism and used its expertise in education and experience of working with young people with autism and their families. Beyond high-quality teaching, therapeutic support will be offered, so that all students have full access to the curriculum, to learn and to achieve. The Cavendish School will offer students the opportunity for multidisciplinary support, which will be carefully matched to the explicit needs of the individual student.

Julie Bailey, Chair of Governors at The Cavendish School and doctoral researcher at the Faculty of Education within the University of Cambridge, said: “The Cavendish School aspires to remove the barriers to inclusion and achievement that many young people with autism face in their education. We’ve built on the best of current provision and the very latest research throughout the design and planning stages. The Cavendish School is set to have a transformative impact, giving its pupils an educational environment in which they will thrive.”

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