Games to Help your Child’s memory – Words by Dunc Llew

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You know that corny old cliché, Practice makes Perfect? Sadly there is a physiological explanation that shows it’s true. When actions are repeated, Myelin is produced in the brain which connects neurons; the more Myelin, the stronger the connection, the better performance.

So if you want to do something easy to help your child’s memory, find a game they like and play a lot. Some suggestions:

  1. Play card games that require visual memory. Pairs (matching pairs of cards) is particularly good as it uses Working Memory, but other games like Crazy Eights & Uno require players to mentally recall which cards have been played.
  2. Play Missing item (remember items on a tray and them remove one).
  3. Give them an item, cover and and ask to describe in as much detail as possible (eg Tell Me Ten Things About…).
  4. Copying pictures will encourage children to focus on different aspects of the image.
  5. Spot the Difference games

Words by Dunc Llew.

CEO and Founder of www.elephantwise.uk

 

Neuroscience and how Kids are Distracted when Revising – Words by Duncan Llew

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View claims of multi-tasking prowess with suspicion – evidence suggests efficient multitasking isn’t possible. World famous neuroscientist and attention expert Earl Miller says that our brains are “not wired to multitask well… When people think they’re multitasking, they’re actually just switching from one task to another very rapidly. And every time they do, there’s a cognitive cost in doing so.”
Key driver is dopamine, the brain hormone associated with pleasure. The brain produces it in anticipation of a reward which is usually a learned behaviour thus addictive. For example, we see a favourite food and know that pleasure will come from eating it so dopamine is released. We get the dopamine pleasure hit before tasting and then the actual pleasure from eating it, like a Pavlov dog salivating on hearing the bell before feeding.

The area of the brain which manages behaviour (ie which task to to do next) is the prefrontal cortex. This has a novelty bias, so is constantly looking something new. No surprises that it makes us respond to a new email or text above more mundane issues. Our brain learns that there’s pleasure in responding to a new email or text, so dopamine is produced when we hear our mobile phone bleep to say a new one has arrived. The dopamine makes us feel good as we anticipate looking at the new message (and feel bad if we don’t). So while we may claim that we’re efficiently multi-tasking, the reality is we’re creating a dopamine-addiction feedback loop.

So if if it’s hard for adults to break the multi-tasking addiction, think of the dopamine hungry adolescents – what chance have they of doing some focussed revision?  So confess up that we’re all a bit susceptible to the lure of a little dopamine, and look at steps we can take to minimise distractions

For revision a key action is being very disciplined about where they put the mobile phone during study and how long is realistic to keep away from it without causing anxiety. Yes, people get anxious when separated from their mobile and there’s even a name for it – nomophobia. So maybe accept they’ll check it every 30 or 40 minutes and gear revision targets in those chunks of 40 minutes. The a fifteen minute break catching up with new messages is fine.

Generally most small chunks of revision, ie learning, self-testing, re-learning what was missed, can be fitted around 40 minutes. It’s extremely hard to focus effectively for much longer without a break. The key to success is ensuring children do enough of those 40 minute sessions to effectively learn the material – we can help kids revise, but we can’t teach them wisdom or hindsight.

Dunc Llew

The surplus model of school improvement – By David Didau

Cardboard textured world Europe oriented with a heap of packagesAs teachers we are sometimes guilty of assuming that all would be well if only children behaved better and worked harder. This is basically sound; everything would be better is kids did what was in their best interests. So why don’t they? Well, in some schools they do. In some schools there are strong social norms which ensure that misbehaviour and laziness are the exception. This isn’t because only children from more affluent postcodes are capable of doing the right thing, it’s because schools and teachers have worked hard to make it easier to do the right thing than the wrong thing. They have worked on the assumption that mucking around doesn’t have to be endemic, but kids are basically kids; they’ll default to whatever the prevailing expectations allow.Likewise, all too often schools leaders take the view that everything would be OK if only teachers were more motivated and worked harder. This is the deficit model; the idea that less than desirable outcomes are due to someone else swinging the lead. According to this way of thinking, problems will be solved if this deficit can in some way be addressed. And how should we address this lack in others? Why by supplying more information, stricter parameters, tighter deadlines and clear consequences. This is the logic behind the way our education system manages the accountability process: schools and teachers cannot be trusted to do the right thing and take responsibility for their own development so we will club them with the cudgel of accountability until they fall in to line. Sound familiar?

This edifice depends on the notion that ‘experts’ know best. DfE wallahs, Ofsted inspectors, education consultants, senior leaders are the experts and so it falls to them to ensure that deficits are made up and troublesome classroom teachers are brought into line. There is an inherent and usually unexamined assumption that if you’re an expert it’s because you are in some way better than ‘ordinary’ teachers. But what if we ran our schools on a surplus model? What if we assumed that teachers were basically trustworthy, hard-working, and knew what they were doing? What it were agreed that school leaders achieve their lofty positions not because they ‘know best’, but because their ambitions are different?

But consider this: Any policy predicated on the belief or expectation that teachers can or should work harder will fail. Why? Because, for the most part, teachers are at capacity. Their fingers are worked to bloody stumps and expecting them to pile something else on to their already teetering workloads is not just unreasonable, it’s stupid.

Great school needs great systems. And a system which fails to value the contribution of every member of its workforce is a long way from great. The deficit model recognises that some teachers ‘get it’. They comply, they’re able to juggle impossible demands and somehow perform the Monkey Dance on cue. They are rewarded. And everyone one else is under threat. But not because they’re not working hard, but because they’re not meeting the expectations of ‘experts’. This is formalised in the language we use to grade schools and (although hopefully this is on its way out) teachers: some are good or outstanding and everyone else requires improvement. But if schools are going to be truly great, everyone requires improvement. We all need to be better because we can be. And as Rivkin, Hanushek and Kain point out, left to our own devices our improvement seems to plateau after three years of teaching. We settle for competence instead of striving for mastery. So a decent appraisal system should require teachers to select and develop areas of practice that they wish to improve. To my mind, it doesn’t matter whether these efforts are successful in any measurable sense, it’s the fact that you’ve tried to do something different and difficult that counts.

Great school systems shouldn’t leave teachers to their own devices – we should be actively supported to continually improve. A starting point might be to ask teachers where they currently are and what they need to do. This tool can be a useful starting point:

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Obviously few teachers will place them selves in the bottom left quadrant. I’m not daft enough to claim all teachers are entirely virtuous. I’ve met some who seemingly couldn’t give a shit about anything except dog breeding but they are thankfully rare. Few people stay long in the profession solely due to the generous salaries or long holidays. We teach because we care. And if we’re unsure, we can ask teachers if they want to improve. If they don’t then we can resort to capability procedures, but if they do then we should work with them. And just in case anyone is unclear, placing teaching on capability proceedings isnot working with them.

Lets deal with each group in turn:

Top right

These teachers need both to be recognised and challenged. It’s no good telling them they’re outstanding and leaving it at that. Some who are considered outstanding stop improving just because no one’s sure what to suggest. Just like children who exceed our expectations, these teachers will only improve if we work to increase their aspirations. But we must be so careful not to expect them to work harder. Yes, of course we want them to be involved in system improvement and to spread good practice but only to the extent that we don’t ask them to do more than they’re currently doing. Too often the only solution is promote highly effective teachers out of the classroom where their skills and knowledge are so badly needed. Maybe instead we need to consider how to keep them there as much as we can? They should be both offered challenging opportunities to develop and asked to embrace situations where they might struggle. Offer them secondments either within or outside the school; offer them sabbaticals to develop further; ask them to take on challenges outside their current area of expertise so that they know what it’s like to both to fail and to improve.

Top left

Teachers who already have the motivation to improve are a relatively simple nut to crack. Firstly, any school leader worth their salt already know who they are; there is nothing to be gained from making them even less effective by scrutinising them further. If we’re serious about helping them improve we should think about the following:

  • What are they best at? Most ‘support’ focuses on improving what a teacher is perceived to be bad at, and is consequently, pretty dispiriting. What if instead we started by focusing on and growing teachers’ individual ‘bright spots’ then we have a chance at getting them to believe they can be better.
  • Sort out the basics. If behaviour is a problem, take responsibility for the fact that children think it’s OK to misbehave in any lesson, no matter who the teacher is. In good school this doesn’t happen. Make sure groups are functional and that systems are in place to deal with problems; help teachers set up routines to ensure high expectations. Never ever tell a teacher that poor behaviour is their fault. While it’s true that a well-planned lesson can contribute to good behaviour, it is most certainly not true that good planning can solve behaviour problems.
  • We learn most by observing others and then having an opportunity to ask questions and discuss assumptions. If we want to help struggling teachers improve free them up to observe colleagues. Absolutely don’t expect them to do this in their PPA time – SLT should cover their lessons so that actual support is provided.
  • Use observations as an opportunity to explore mistakes. It’s right that we should have the highest expectations, but this doesn’t mean we should smash people when they fail to live up to them. We would never take this approach with children but it seems pretty standard with teachers. The message must be that it is OK to make mistakes. I’ve heard teaching described as being like air traffic control and that any mistake will cost lives. This is nonsense. We can all always try again and fail better next lesson. Supporting teachers with this message is more likely to lead to something sustainable rather than simply expecting them to get a ‘good’ at the end of a short term intention programme.

Bottom right

There are many teachers who are misunderstood and unappreciated. Maybe they’re not able to ‘turn it on’ for a one-off observation. Maybe their methods are out of step with what the school views as the ‘best’ way to teach. Maybe their face just doesn’t fit. Sadly, if you fit into this category it’s unlikely that any support will be useful if you’re seen as too quirky, too old-fashioned or just too long in the tooth. It is lamentably easy to destroy a good teacher through such ‘support’. Obviously though, we need someway to ensure that teachers really are effective, so what can we do? This is where we need robust performance management measures; not for the pupils’ benefit per se, but to ensure that we are right in our judgements. These measure might include the following:

  • Data – How well do pupils perform in internal and external tests? How well do pupils perform against other teachers’ classes? If you don’t know the answers to these questions, you’ve got a problem.
  • It’s absolutely reasonable that a school requires that certain standards are ‘non-negotiatiable’. Are they standards being met? How do you know? Formalised classroom observations andwork scrutinies are mechanisms for ensuring these basics are in place with out the need for any clumsy grading, but in a good school, leaders will know these things because they are constantly out and about. They will know what different areas of the school ‘feel’ like and they will know who is on message and who isn’t. If a member of SLT is present in corridors and classrooms every lesson then there should be no surprises.
  • How can we use pupils’ feedback to improve what we do? I’m suspicious of Student Voice. Just asking kids whether or not they like a teacher is a ridiculously blunt instrument. But a well-designed questionnaire or interview may be able to capture something useful about pupils’ experience of lessons. Just because this is hard to do well is not a reason for not trying to do it at all.

Bottom left

Some of these individuals are toxic and give us all a bad name. They don’t mark their books, they resort of videos at the slightest provocation and they give kids a thoroughly raw deal. Thankfully they’re relatively rare, but I’m sure every school has one or two. And as with the other categories of teachers, everyone will know who they are. How you decide to deal with them is up to you. Is it worth the effort of trying to save them, or should they be fired as soon as is expedient? That’s a judgement call. But I’d reiterate the point that we should work with everyone who’s willing to improve. Simply forcing them out and giving them a glowing reference is just shuffling the deck. For the whole system to improve we need these teachers to be better if they’re planning to stay in education.

There is a huge opportunity cost with the deficit model. Anything you ask teachers to do just for the sake of accountability is time that cannot be spent doing something more worthwhile. Although setting up a surplus model and trusting teachers to make the most of the support we provide and be the best they can be is scary, it’s the only way a school can be truly great.

If you’d like to discuss how to implement this sort of school improvement model in your school, please get in touch.

David Didau

http://www.learningspy.co.uk/

School Life

 

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We hope you are well, and School life is going smoothly?

We like to keep you informed of our plans and to let you know what’s in store for the next 2 terms, and what you can expect to see from us.

There is only one way to stay ahead of the Education game, and that is to read The Educator Magazine.

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The next issue is out on May 8th 2015 and you can expect to read expert commentary from top governing bodies giving their opinions on latest news and legislation, as well as a couple of surprise celebrity interviews!

As always, you will find key guidance and advice for the discerning Head, Deputy, Teacher, Bursar, General Manager, and more.

Make sure to register your School on our FREE Subscribe page online for extra benefits and mentions socially from us for your School or establishment. This offer is only FREE for Schools, SEN Establishments, PRU’s etc.

Lastly, your School may have some exciting news or a press release you need to publish to the masses, and we would be more than happy to receive these for consideration. You can feel free to email the Editor direct at editor@the-educator.org and she may choose to highlight your School in our next issue!

We would love to hear your feedback on The Educator Magazine and all feedback will be met with great thanks, and in return, a mention for your School on our social media outlets.

Enjoy your Easter break and we look forward to hearing from you soon.

Best wishes

TEM Team

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We have our online Schools Services Directory here where you can list your company for a small charge for either 6 months or 12 months respectively.

We are looking to fill the categories very quickly and as such we are offering an incredible 3-for-1 on the category listings. The reduced cost for 6 months listing like this, is a tiny £495 and only £995 for a full year. As mentioned, you will get 3 categories for the cost of only 1! We also guarantee to have no more than 3 companies in any one category listing, giving you peace of mind and value for money. You may also choose and create your own category listing if you do not see one that fits your requirements. We suggest you choose and claim the 1st positions in the categories ASAP!EducatorHome

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Who Are You? – Written by The School Planner Co.

SPC_logoWho Are You?

The question: ‘Who are you?’ is one that probably doesn’t cross your mind all that often, unless of course you are currently in the depths of an existential mid-life crisis.

For teachers however, particularly new teachers, this is actually a question that seems pretty valid, and probably isn’t asked enough. But in today’s world you can’t just ask the question ‘Who are you?’ (At least you can’t if you want to get something that resembles an accurate response.) Instead we must ask ‘Who are you, in this really quite specific situation?’ Obviously this variation of the question doesn’t quite roll off the tongue as easily as it’s succinct and pithy counterpart, but it is immeasurably more accurate. We, the modern human being, do not have just one identity, or one personality. We have many.

Not to accuse you of being two faced, you’re not, and it would be far more correct to accuse you of being five faced, maybe six, maybe even more. We conduct ourselves in an entirely different way when in the company of our boss, as we do with our parents, or children, of friends, or on the bus, or on a date, etc.

Now let me tell you something I probably shouldn’t: I have known ‘teachers’ to swear. I have been in the company of ‘teachers’ who have made quite risky jokes, who have laughed at the misfortune of others. This bit may be hard to believe, but I have even witnessed ‘teachers’ brazenly parade around in public, with their top button undone and shirt not tucked in.

Except, at the time; they were not teachers. Hence the sarcastic apostrophes. At the time, they were not teaching a class, they weren’t even inside a school building. They were a million miles away from the teacher persona they put on at school.

Now this isn’t being fake, or lying, or falsehood. They are simply displaying a facet of themselves that they reserve for the classroom. After all; the sarcastic, joke-cracking, shirt-untucked, occasionally swearing, persona you might find in a bar on a Friday evening, has no place in a school.

For new teachers, creating their teacher persona isn’t easy. You probably won’t get it right straight away. You might even spend your entire NQT year getting it wrong, and the following three years making slight adaptations to it as you progress and grow as a teacher. But it is important that you consider it, that you are always conscious of who you are when you are in school.

Whilst I can’t tell you who you are, or instruct you on what your teacher persona should be, I can give you an idea of who you are not. Firstly you are not the outside-of-school persona we have already discussed. That person leaves you at the school gate, and whilst he or she may be patiently waiting for you to finish at the end of the day, during your time in school you should have no contact, not a wave from the window, not even a lunch-time text. You don’t want your students to see you as you, you want them to see you as what you should be- in charge.

At the risk of coming over hypocritical. You still need to be yourself. Just not completely yourself. Be you, but not all of you. As much as that might upset John Legend. If YOU can’t muster up a little gravitas and dexterity, then maybe you have chosen the wrong career? The classroom needs a leader, and before you nervously look over your shoulder looking for someone else to step up to the plate; as a teacher, that leader needs to be you.

If I could sumarise everything you need to be in just one word (which I can) it would be: adult.

You have to be the adult in the classroom. It doesn’t matter that just a few months ago you we’re taking advantage of two for one at Vodka Rev’s every weekend, or that actually you’re a mere four years older than some of your A-level students, you are the adult. If this isn’t something you are prepared for; then again, teaching maybe (definitely) isn’t the career for you. Not yet anyway.

I grew up with a head-teacher as a parent. As a child, other kids used to find it hard to comprehend that teachers existed outside of school, that they have their own lives and interests in the real world. And the truth is they don’t. Not only because of the heinous time commitments associated with the job, but because actually; teachers do, and should, leave themselves at school. Once they are outside of the building, they become a new person. They revert to being themselves.

Teachers, as many primary school children already believe, do not exist outside of school.

Right into my teenage years friends would comment that they just couldn’t see my dad as a head-teacher, they couldn’t possibly imagine him telling someone off, or raising his voice. I didn’t quite realise at the time, but I know now, that that is because my dad isn’t a head-teacher. He wasn’t then and he isn’t now. He both was and is my dad. But when he steps over the threshold of his school, he becomes someone else entirely; he becomes a head-teacher. He becomes someone you may well have had the pleasure of meeting, but someone whose acquaintance I am yet to make.

Interview with Aldo De Pape – Founder of Teach Pitch.

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TEM – Aldo, please tell me why you are now every teachers new best friend?

 

ALDO – Hahaha, I would surely love to be.

 

TeachPitch is a web-based platform that helps teachers and schools to find the best online learning resources in the quickest way possible.

 

With a growing abundance of learning material available on the Internet (e.g.: videos, downloads, lesson plans, online courses and online tutoring) it is becoming increasingly difficult for teachers to find the best available resources most relevant to the learning questions they have. As a former teacher I know how constraint for time (and budget) educators can be and with our platform we focus on presenting you with the best resources out there in the quickest way possible.

 

TEM – So, effectively a time efficient search engine?

 

ALDO – Yes that is step number one. After you have found the right resources we offer you a range of functionalities to save, rate, review and plan around the resources you have identified. We are fortunate enough to be growing very quickly – in the thousands of teachers from over 81 countries have already signed up  – so you are also able to share your learning ideas with educators from all over the world with just the click of a button.

 

TEM- Can this platform meet specific outcomes for each school?

 

ALDO – It sure can. Through our TeachPitch for Schools solution that we are due to launch later this year, we allow multiple people within a school to work with our technology. Many central administrators and school directors are looking for optimal ways to work together with their teachers on the identification of online resources for purposes of collaboration, re-use, induction and even evaluation. Such an account would allow people in a central school position to have an overview of which material their teachers are using while giving suggestions on how to fit it even better within the school program or curriculum.

 

We are really happy to see that schools are currently signing up to find out how they can work with our technology to this end.

 

TEM – What about teachers CPD, everyone needs to be informed, can this help those on the ground meet their own needs too?

 

ALDO – Yes. We are seeing a growing number of CPD courses becoming digitally available. Technology has enabled us to disseminate  great online CPD courses so a teacher can work with such material at his/her own pace. Another advantage is that the teacher has a genuine choice as to which course is most appropriate and relevant.

 

We are currently partnering with a number of teacher training agencies and video platforms in the UK so teachers can find and work with CPD resources online.

 

TEM – What are your plans for further development Aldo?

 

ALDO – It is our aim to help as many teachers and schools as possible by finding them the best online learning resources. In terms of development we want to be the best technology out there, so teachers can truly learn more and teach better.  Currently we are working on building solutions that teachers and schools can use while using the most relevant resources at the right point in time.

 

We aim to be as precise as possible, implementing carefully what and how teachers are going to use our technology.

 

It is great to see that the TP community is growing and we receive great feedback from our teachers as to what we should build first.

 

TEM – As we were speaking here, I have managed to access Teach Pitch from my mobile device, I love that its on the move!

 

ALDO –  Thank you – we are working with a team of 11 people on TeachPitch right now, so every day I see improvements on the platform. It is really great to be part of such a process.

 

TEM – What would you say to the Head Teachers reading this right now?

 

ALDO – Think digital!  There are so many great online resources out there that you can use to support your teachers every step of the way.

 

TEM – Well then, and extremely informative chat! Thank you for speaking with us Aldo, where can we find out more about Teach Pitch?

 

Sign up to TeachPitch.com and let us know what you see. We would love to hear your thoughts.

 

 

 

 

Bargain Time!

As you may have noticed from our social platforms, we have an exclusive limited 50% off our normal rate card for all bookings for next issue for the next 14 days. This discount represents a significant saving for you and a great opportunity to showcase your product / service to all UK Schools/Academies and Senior Leadership Teams within. We have plenty of right hand pages and superb positions for you too with an incredible line up of writers, governing bodies, celebrity interviews to boot! As well as the huge discount, we are matching your purchase with free editorial space giving you maximum impact!

To secure your preferred position early, and save a huge 50% AND get a free editorial allocation too, email me Toby Johnson – Director@the-educator.org NOW.

WHO ARE YOU? – Words by The School Planner Company

Who Are You?
The question: ‘Who are you?’ is one that probably doesn’t cross your mind all that often, unless of course you are currently in the depths of an existential mid-life crisis.
For teachers however, particularly new teachers, this is actually a question that seems pretty valid, and probably isn’t asked enough. But in todays world you can’t just ask the question ‘Who are you?’ (At least you can’t if you want to get something that resembles an accurate response.) Instead we must ask ‘Who are you, in this really quite specific situation?’ Obviously this variation of the question doesn’t quite roll off the tongue as easily as it’s succinct and pithy counterpart, but it is immeasurably more accurate. We, the modern human being, do not have just one identity, or one personality. We have many.
Not to accuse you of being two faced, you’re not, and it would be far more correct to accuse you of being five faced, maybe six, maybe even more. We conduct ourselves in an entirely different way when in the company of our boss, as we do with our parents, or children, of friends, or on the bus, or on a date, etc.
Now let me tell you something I probably shouldn’t: I have known ‘teachers’ to swear. I have been in the company of ‘teachers’ who have made quite risky jokes, who have laughed at the misfortune of others. This bit may be hard to believe, but I have even witnessed ‘teachers’ brazenly parade around in public, with their top button undone and shirt untucked.
Except, at the time; they were not teachers. Hence the sarcastic apostrophes. At the time, they were not teaching a class, they weren’t even inside a school building. They were a million miles away from the teacher persona they put on at school.
Now this isn’t being fake, or lying, or falsehood. They are simply displaying a facet of themselves that they reserve for the classroom. After all; the sarcastic, joke-cracking, shirt-untucked, occasionally swearing, persona you might find in a bar on a Friday evening, has no place in a school.
For new teachers, creating their teacher persona isn’t easy. You probably won’t get it right straight away. You might even spend your entire NQT year getting it wrong, and the following three years making slight adaptations to it as you progress and grow as a teacher. But it is important that you consider it, that you are always conscious of who you are when you are in school.
Whilst I can’t tell you who you are, or instruct you on what your teacher persona should be, I can give you an idea of who you are not. Firstly you are not the outside-of-school persona we have already discussed. That person leaves you at the school gate, and whilst he or she may be patiently waiting for you to finish at the end of the day, during your time in school you should have no contact, not a wave from the window, not even a lunch-time text. You don’t want your students to see you as you, you want them to see you as what you should be- in charge.
At the risk of coming over hypocritical. You still need to be yourself. Just not completely yourself. Be you, but not all of you. As much as that might upset John Legend. If YOU can’t muster up a little gravitas and dexterity, then maybe you have chosen the wrong career? The classroom needs a leader, and before you nervously look over your shoulder looking for someone else to step up to the plate; as a teacher, that leader needs to be you.
If I could summarise everything you need to be in just one word (which I can) it would be: adult.
You have to be the adult in the classroom. It doesn’t matter that just a few months ago you we’re taking advantage of two for one at Vodka Rev’s every weekend, or that actually you’re a mere four years older than some of your A-level students, you are the adult. If this isn’t something you are prepared for; then again, teaching maybe (definitely) isn’t the career for you. Not yet anyway.
I grew up with a head-teacher as a parent. As a child, other kids used to find it hard to comprehend that teachers existed outside of school, that they have their own lives and interests in the real world. And the truth is they don’t. Not only because of the heinous time commitments associated with the job, but because actually; teachers do, and should, leave themselves at school. Once they are outside of the building, they become a new person. They revert to being themselves.
Teachers, as many primary school children already believe, do not exist outside of school.
Right into my teenage years friends would comment that they just couldn’t see my dad as a head-teacher, they couldn’t possibly imagine him telling someone off, or raising his voice. I didn’t quite realise at the time, but I know now, that that is because my dad isn’t a head-teacher. He wasn’t then and he isn’t now. He both was and is my dad. But when he steps over the threshold of his school, he becomes someone else entirely; he becomes a head-teacher. He becomes someone you may well have had the pleasure of meeting, but someone whose acquaintance I am yet to make.
The School Planner Company