Free e-safety course by Petra’s Planet Share for Safer Internet Day 2016

Tuesday 9 February: To coincide with Safer Internet Day 2016, cross curricula learning tool, Petra’s Planet Share, has organised a free online e-safety course for primary schools, to promote the safer and more responsible use of online technology and mobile phones for children and young people.

 

The free e-safety course lasts for three lessons and includes homework ideas, with users able to access the course and all other lesson plans for 30 days after registering, as well as gain free access to Petra’s Planet Share for the duration of the course, with no commitment to usage after the course.

 

“Teaching safe and responsible internet usage and practice is something that schools are increasingly making a higher priority,” says Kimmo Kärpijoki, business director at Petra’s Planet Share. “That’s why we wanted to offer this e-safety course out for free for Safer Internet Day; empowering schools to enable children to make the most of the internet safely is incredibly important in today’s increasingly online world.”

 

A core part of the course focuses on cyberbullying. According to the UK Council for Internet Child Safety, 52 per cent of primary teachers reported that pupils at their school have experienced cyberbullying, with the most significant form of cyberbullying coming via social networking sites. “We need to ensure that we are educating today’s children as best as possible to navigate the internet as safely and respectfully as possible. We know that cyberbullying is becoming a problem in schools, so it is our responsibility to help tackle this from the ground up” explains Kimmo.

 

“Whilst the internet offers an incredible range of exciting opportunities for children’s learning, it also opens up an entire online world in which children can be increasingly vulnerable,” continues Kimmo. “Parents and teachers can’t monitor children’s online behaviour 24 hours a day, which is why giving schools the power to educate children about safe online practice is the best possible preventative measure to online dangers.”

 

The free e-safety course is designed to cover three core aspects of safer internet usage, with 45 minute lesson plans on how to teach safety aspects behind online profiles, writing for an online audience and dealing with cyberbullying. Upon completion of the course, the school and pupils are given digital E-Safety Course Badge, which can then be proudly displayed on the school website or VLE to celebrate the school’s collective achievement.

 

To access the free online e-safety course, follow this link to register here, or visit petrasplanetshare.com for more information.

 

Education rides out the recession above private sector roles

Education ranked as fifth most resilient workforce throughout the recession, with the aggregate wage bill rising 14% in real terms since 2002 to £41bn – driven by a surge in non-teaching or unqualified positions in schools

  • Overall, teaching and educational professionals combined now account for 6.4% of the UK’s total full-time wage bill
  • Higher concentration of public sector employers shelters education sector from the worst of recessionary pressure  – but austerity has since hit real wages, and held back pay for teachers
  • As a result, full-time qualified teachers now make up just 46% of school staff

 

 

Education has proven its mettle as one of the top most recession-proof careers in the UK over the past decade, according to an analysis of ONS and professional industry data carried out by specialist recruiter Randstad Education[1].

 

Randstad’s analysis ranks each occupation by the change in the aggregate wage bill for full-time staff between 2002 and 2014, adjusting for the effects of inflation[2].  This takes account of both the resilience of employment levels and real wages to provide a rounded view of how recession-proof each occupation is.

 

EDUCATION AMONG TOP MOST RECESSION-PROOF INDUSTRIES

 

Education was ranked the fifth most recession-proof occupation.  The total wage bill for full-time teaching and educational employees has climbed 14% in real terms from £35.9bn in 2002 to £40.8bn in 2014.

 

Jobs in education have proved more resilient than professions like accountancy, engineering, policing and management consultancy through the dark days of the financial crisis – and this is due to an overall increase in the number of full-time education employees, as opposed to pay cheques.

 

In particular, this has been driven by the substantial rise in non-teaching staff and support staff employed in the education sector. Over the past decade, the number of teaching assistants in state schools has jumped 42%, whereas there has only been a 4.4% increase in qualified teachers over the same period.  This means that the proportion of staff employed in schools that are full-time teachers has dropped from 59% in 2005 to 46% in 2014, as the non-teaching segment of the workforce expands.

 

Despite a teacher pay freeze for the first three years of the Coalition Government, followed by just a one per cent rise after this, when taken as a whole education jobs have fared better than average overall. The UK’s aggregate pay bill for full-time staff across the education sector has dropped in real terms by just 3% from £653.8bn in 2002 to £634.1bn in 2014.

 

Due to the rise in opportunities for non-teaching roles, jobs in education have also grown to represent 6.4% of the total wage bill for all UK full time employees, up from 5.5% in 2002.  The education workforce has weathered recessionary pressures and increased by 220,000 employees between 2002 and 2014.

 

Occupation Total wage bill 2002 (£ million) Total wage bill 2014 (£ million) Rise in real wage bill (2002-14) Increase in real wages (2002-14)
Technology professionals 17,365 31,558 81.7% -11.1%
Social workers 1,905 2,385 25.2% -4.4%
Nurses 10,288 12,653 23.0% -5.4%
Transport professionals 2,795 3,344 19.6% 43.8%
Education professionals 35,945 40,782 13.5% -9.8%
Accountants 12,718 14,175 11.5% -18.4%
All UK full-time workers 653,816 634,069 -3.0% -7.5%

 

Table 1: Most recession-proof occupations ranked by 2002-14

 

Jenny Rollinson, managing director of Randstad Education, comments: “Living through the recession has highlighted that any future career switch needs to take into account how recession-proof different occupations are.

 

“Although it’s well-documented that teachers had their pay frozen at the beginning of the Coalition Government, education was actually dealt a better hand during the economic downturn than many other professions. During a recession, the chance of losing your job in occupations like accountancy or management consultancy is relatively high, and if you are made redundant, it’s difficult to find a new one. But this isn’t the case for jobs in education. With the UK population rising, and burgeoning demand in schools, teaching jobs and other vital support roles will always be needed – and there are significant opportunities for those interested in working in education who aren’t qualified teachers. In fact, the fastest workforce growth over the past ten years has been in these non-teaching positions.  This has meant that throughout the recession rollercoaster of recent years, employment levels in the education sector as a whole have risen robustly, and this resilience in the face of the recession should be encouraging for those looking for a variety of jobs within education.”

 

REAL WAGES

 

Overall, the public purse afford 220,000 more full-time education jobs between 2002 and 2014 – the second highest workforce increase, behind only the technology industry (which added 360,000 to its workforce over the same 12 years).

 

But while education may have weathered the recession better than other sectors in terms of headcount, the flipside of the coin is that this proliferation of non-teaching staff in school has held back teachers’ pay. Real wages in education have dipped by 9.8%, taking the average salary to £37,976.

 

This was a more severe drop than the typical trend seen across the country. On average, real wages across the UK economy fell 7.5% between 2002 and 2014.

 

Occupation Average 2002 wage (in 2014 £) Average 2014 wage (in 2014 £) Increase in real wages (2002-14)
Transport professional 53,048 76,281 43.8%
Social worker 33,405 31,934 -4.4%
Nurse 33,358 31,559 -5.4%
Travel agent 22,125 20,775 -6.1%
Electrician 34,037 31,150 -8.5%
Engineering professional 45,948 41,959 -8.7%
Retail sales assistant 18,381 16,704 -9.1%
Education professional 42,115 37,976 -9.8%
Technology professional 50,347 44,780 -11.1%
Police officer 44,488 39,292 -11.7%
Accountant 51,761 42,244 -18.4%
Building trades 42,560 26,492 -37.8%
Management consultant 83,355 47,424 -43.1%
All UK full-time workers 36,193 33,475 -7.5%

 

Table 2: Real full-time wages for selected occupations 2002-14

 

PUBLIC SECTOR BETTER INSULATED – BUT AUSTERITY STILL EVIDENT

 

Randstad’s analysis reveals that occupations dominated by public sector employers have proven more recession-proof than those with staff predominantly employed by private sector. For instance, the total full-time wage bill for social work and nursing has grown by over 20% since 2012, coupled with below-average fall in real wages of 4% and 5% respectively.

 

But the impact of austerity measures is evident in key public sector occupations since 2011, with the majority of the real wage cuts experienced by teaching and educational professionals, social workers and nurses has happened in the past three years.  Teaching and educational professionals experienced a 7% decline in real wages since 2011, outpacing real wage gains in 2002-6 and no change across 2007-10.  

 

Occupation Change in real wages (2002-6) Change in real wages (2007-10) Change in real wages (2011-14)
Social worker 7.5% -0.5% -3.9%
Transport professional 4.8% 6.8% 13.7%
Police officer 3.2% -2.5% -8.1%
Education professional 2.3% 0.0% -6.9%
Technology professional 1.6% -3.7% -5.2%
Nurse 0.0% 3.2% -6.4%
Electrician -0.3% 3.9% -4.0%
Travel agent -0.7% -0.4% -3.9%
Accountant -1.3% -6.1% -3.7%
Engineering professional -1.8% -0.9% -4.1%
Retail sales assistant -4.8% -0.4% -5.0%
Building trades -11.9% -10.3% -12.8%
Management consultant -17.8% -6.3% -10.4%
All UK full-time workers 3.8% -0.9% -5.9%

 

Table 3: Change in real wages in different economic conditions 2002-14

 

Jenny Rollinson concludes: “Professions with a large proportion of private sector employment certainly enjoy some extra cushioning against the knocks of an economic downturn, and the take-off in the number of wider education workers over this period is testament to that fact. Only the trendy fast-growing technology sector has witnessed better employment growth. Working for a growing industry – like education – shelters you from some of the worst symptoms of economic downturn. Even if your school is closed down or there are budget cuts in your local authority, you can be confident that you will be able to find another position – a luxury many other occupations don’t share.

 

“But public sector occupations can’t be insulated entirely, and it’s not just job security that you have to worry about when a recession strikes. Wage security is a worry for the staff that remain, as the ratio of candidates to roles skyrockets. In the case of education jobs, as the workforce grows to accommodate school children numbers, real wages have found themselves exposed. But the impact has been much more concentrated in the later years of the economic recovery, as austerity cuts bite, and education salaries actually found a safe haven in the immediate aftermath of the crash – lessening the impact we see today.”

 

 

RANDSTAD STUDENT SUPPORT PUTS SHROPSHIRE STUDENTS IN POLE POSITION

Randstad Student Support, a leading provider of learning support staff, has taken a group of 15 budding Formula 1 racing engineers to the Williams Martini Racing F1 Factory for a day of innovation, excitement and engineering insight.

 

The lucky group from North Shropshire College included 14 students who fought off tough competition to win the trip, managing to take home the trophy in a competition hosted by Randstad Student Support at the Association of Colleges conference held in November.

 

Randstad Student Support worked with 65 further education colleges and 93 universities around the UK last year, providing vital support for 28,000 students, helping them to achieve their potential.

 

All the students on the tour are currently studying either engineering or mechanics at the college and were given a glimpse into the inner working of the Williams garages. Also attending from Randstad was Victoria Short, Managing Director, Sadie Besley, Operations Director and Karen Guthrie, Further Education Development Manager.

 

Students visited the advanced engineering section of the factory, learning how engineers at Williams use their high-tech, scientific knowledge to solve everyday problems. For example, students discovered that Williams’ pioneering work in cooling down race car engines had been transferred to reducing energy bills in the frozen aisles of supermarkets – creating vast energy savings.

 

This revealed the wide range of professional options available to the students and the versatility of engineering as a career choice. With 431 engineering jobs currently available on Randstad’s website there’s high hopes the visit will have inspired a new generation of expertise.[1]

 

Students also got the chance to prove their racing credentials and try to beat the best of F1 drivers on a BATAK reaction machine. Unfortunately the chequered flag was out of reach – with most posting scores half those of professional drivers.

 

And the final pit stop was to the Williams museum, to check out the trophy collection and see F1 mementos up close.

 

Sadie Besley, Operations Director, Randstad Student Support comments: “This competition was all about inspiring innovation in students – and giving them a glimpse into a potential career in engineering. F1 is the pinnacle of professional racing – and we want North Shropshire students to be at the top of their game. It was fantastic to see the students engage with the experience and fully embrace all the elements that create a successful F1 team. A practical and hands-on opportunity can give students the motivation to further their careers and something to aim for in the future. The skills picked up on the tour are highly applicable and will act as a real motivator for these budding engineers.”

 

A real highlight of the trip was a chance to speak to Williams engineers and learn more about their career paths. Students had the opportunity to ask questions and find out more about future career prospects on offer at Williams. There are a wide variety of ways for students to improve their skills, with many apprenticeships on offer throughout the industry.

 

Sadie Besley, Operations Director, Randstad Student Support concludes: “The best way to get ahead and give yourself the best career opportunities in the engineering sector is to get some hands-on experience. It doesn’t have to be paid work, any time that can be spent learning on the job, gaining practical skills and boosting your experience can give you a great advantage as a candidate. It’s hard to find the right person for the right job and experience and enthusiasm are key for outpacing other applicants.

 

“For further education colleges looking to encourage students to pursue their interests in engineering and technology, the best way is to provide opportunities to see engineers in action. This doesn’t have to be a grand trip to a F1 Factory, it can simply be arranging for engineers to visit and speak to students. Practical advice is particularly important. And nothing is as inspiring as seeing a true professional in action.”

[1] https://www.randstad.co.uk/jobs/s-engineering/

 

 

AWARD-WINNING ONLINE RESOURCE HIGHLIGHTS WORK FOR YOUNG PEOPLE DURING CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH WEEK…

AN AWARD-winning online resource is using this week’s national Children’s Mental Health Week to highlight the vulnerability of young boys and the issues they face.

Insight4Life is already being used in schools across the UK, giving confidential, expert advice to youngsters on a whole host of subjects while also giving them support information and coping mechanisms.

And now the experts behind the website have revealed that almost twice as many teenage boys as girls are flagging up suicidal feelings and are looking for help and support.

Under its brand name Zumos, Insight4Life gives young people access to peer reviewed motivational support, in forms ranging from web links to suggested readings.

A study of what young people are using the site for reveals that twice as many boys than girls are looking at advice around bulimia and on how to tell someone they are being sexually abused.

Youngsters of all ages are also accessing information about wanting to lose weight and how to cope with self-harming.

Zumos covers a vast range of subjects, meaning that any youngster who feels they have nowhere to go or is too frightened to ask for help can get vital information and support.

Insight4Life is being used in a number of schools, which are able to control the information that can be accessed and which are also given statistical information about the kind of problems their pupils are highlighting.

The Zumos programme has already won a number of awards and has been praised by OFSTED for the level of the information, advice and guidance it provides saying that it offers “a holistic perspective much more detailed and far more advanced than normal information, advice and guidance services.”

 

2

Gary Siva, Chief Executive of Insight4Life, said that having one website dedicated to helping young people with support for all of their problems was proving extremely popular.

“Children’s Mental Health Week flags up the emotional issues that a lot of young people are going through and how many of them are in need of help and support,” he said.

“Through our Zumos programme young people are able to get expert advice in confidence on all of the issues which are affecting their lives.

“This is also about empowering them, showing them ways to make them more confident and to give them lessons which will see them through life.”

The success of Insight4Life has seen its founders being asked to roll it as far afield as Italy and China.

The organisation is also now looking at developing a programme for primary school children and for adults.

“There are so many issues affecting people of all ages that they are often too frightened to ask about,” said Gary.

“What we offer is expert advice in a range of formats to give people the power to take charge and find a way through whatever is worrying them.”

For further information visit www.insight4life.co.uk

POOR FINANCIAL SYSTEMS ARE BIGGEST BARRIER FOR ACADEMY SUCCESS

Inadequate financial systems are holding academies back and are becoming a barrier to conversion, new research has found.

A study by HCSS Education, a leading education finance specialist, found that one of the biggest challenges academies faced when converting came from using existing finance management systems that were not fit for purpose. 49% of academies cited this as the biggest conversion challenge, over dealing with cash flow issues (10%), managing expectations and worries of employees (21%) and the recruitment of new staff, such as a chief financial officer (10%).

When academy leaders were asked what they disliked about their current financial accounting system, 52% said it was difficult to get the data and reports that they need, 30% said it was overly complex and difficult to use and 25% said it was not designed with an education establishment in mind.

The report found that 65% of academies decided to convert to gain greater control over finances. However, the autonomy presented to academies carries an increased responsibility, making it no surprise that the same research also found that actually having complete control over finances was a main concern facing academy leaders in their role (34%).

The survey was conducted as part of HCSS Education’s Academy Futures report, which takes an insightful look into how the education landscape is changing and the impact the rise of academies is having on both teachers and parents. It explores the barriers to conversion, the challenges schools may face when they first convert, and how these issues can be addressed.

Howard Jackson, head of education and founder of HCSS Education, said: “Despite the benefits often associated with academy conversion, such as more freedom over finances and greater autonomy over the day-to-day running of the school, making the change and becoming an academy does not come without its challenges.

“When a school becomes an academy it is suddenly expected to manage all its own finances and meet Government requirements, so having a competent financial accounting system in place is key. However, our research highlights that many academies do not have the right support in place and, as such, are struggling with their new financial responsibilities.

“With an abundance of financial management systems on the market, it is wise for academy leaders to invest in a robust system that has been specifically built for the education sector. This is because they have been purposely designed to help simplify operations, keep a track of budget and assets, and provide evidence that the academy’s budget is being handled in the most effective way possible.”

For more information, please visit http://www.hcsseducation.co.uk/blog/academy-futures-report

St. John’s Prep School Crowned Middlesex County Football Champions

St. John’s U11 footballers continued their highly impressive season by becoming Middlesex County Football Champions over the weekend.

West Lodge (Harrow), John Keble (Brent) and St. John’s (Enfield) played in a tightly contested round robin competition, which was highlighted by all the games ending in draws.

First, St. John’s played John Keeble. St. John’s took the lead through Flavio Gomes only for John Keble to cancel it out with an equaliser halfway through the second half. 

The next two games were both 0-0 draws, and consequently all three teams finished on equal points and goal difference. The tournament was to be decided on penalties, and as St. John’s and John Keble had both scored one more goal than West Lodge, it would be those two teams to go head to head. 

Sean Kanu and Takumi Satoh calmly scored their penalties. St. John’s keeper, Philip Pawlik, saved John Keble’s first penalty and when they fired their third penalty wide, meaning St. John’s celebrations could begin. 

St. John’s Prep School now go onto represent Middlesex in the South East of England regional final of The English Schools Football Association Cup, the first time an independent School from Middlesex have had this honour. 

Please visit www.sports.stjohnsprepandseniorschool.com for more information about sports at St. John’s

Education rides out the recession above private sector roles

  • Education ranked as fifth most resilient workforce throughout the recession, with the aggregate wage bill rising 14% in real terms since 2002 to £41bn – driven by a surge in non-teaching or unqualified positions in schools
  • Overall, teaching and educational professionals combined now account for 6.4% of the UK’s total full-time wage bill
  • Higher concentration of public sector employers shelters education sector from the worst of recessionary pressure  – but austerity has since hit real wages, and held back pay for teachers
  • As a result, full-time qualified teachers now make up just 46% of school staff

 

 

Education has proven its mettle as one of the top most recession-proof careers in the UK over the past decade, according to an analysis of ONS and professional industry data carried out by specialist recruiter Randstad Education[1].

 

Randstad’s analysis ranks each occupation by the change in the aggregate wage bill for full-time staff between 2002 and 2014, adjusting for the effects of inflation[2].  This takes account of both the resilience of employment levels and real wages to provide a rounded view of how recession-proof each occupation is.

 

EDUCATION AMONG TOP MOST RECESSION-PROOF INDUSTRIES

 

Education was ranked the fifth most recession-proof occupation.  The total wage bill for full-time teaching and educational employees has climbed 14% in real terms from £35.9bn in 2002 to £40.8bn in 2014.

 

Jobs in education have proved more resilient than professions like accountancy, engineering, policing and management consultancy through the dark days of the financial crisis – and this is due to an overall increase in the number of full-time education employees, as opposed to pay cheques.

 

In particular, this has been driven by the substantial rise in non-teaching staff and support staff employed in the education sector. Over the past decade, the number of teaching assistants in state schools has jumped 42%, whereas there has only been a 4.4% increase in qualified teachers over the same period.  This means that the proportion of staff employed in schools that are full-time teachers has dropped from 59% in 2005 to 46% in 2014, as the non-teaching segment of the workforce expands.

 

Despite a teacher pay freeze for the first three years of the Coalition Government, followed by just a one per cent rise after this, when taken as a whole education jobs have fared better than average overall. The UK’s aggregate pay bill for full-time staff across the education sector has dropped in real terms by just 3% from £653.8bn in 2002 to £634.1bn in 2014.

 

Due to the rise in opportunities for non-teaching roles, jobs in education have also grown to represent 6.4% of the total wage bill for all UK full time employees, up from 5.5% in 2002.  The education workforce has weathered recessionary pressures and increased by 220,000 employees between 2002 and 2014.

 

Occupation Total wage bill 2002 (£ million) Total wage bill 2014 (£ million) Rise in real wage bill (2002-14) Increase in real wages (2002-14)
Technology professionals 17,365 31,558 81.7% -11.1%
Social workers 1,905 2,385 25.2% -4.4%
Nurses 10,288 12,653 23.0% -5.4%
Transport professionals 2,795 3,344 19.6% 43.8%
Education professionals 35,945 40,782 13.5% -9.8%
Accountants 12,718 14,175 11.5% -18.4%
All UK full-time workers 653,816 634,069 -3.0% -7.5%

 

Table 1: Most recession-proof occupations ranked by 2002-14

 

Jenny Rollinson, managing director of Randstad Education, comments: “Living through the recession has highlighted that any future career switch needs to take into account how recession-proof different occupations are.

 

“Although it’s well-documented that teachers had their pay frozen at the beginning of the Coalition Government, education was actually dealt a better hand during the economic downturn than many other professions. During a recession, the chance of losing your job in occupations like accountancy or management consultancy is relatively high, and if you are made redundant, it’s difficult to find a new one. But this isn’t the case for jobs in education. With the UK population rising, and burgeoning demand in schools, teaching jobs and other vital support roles will always be needed – and there are significant opportunities for those interested in working in education who aren’t qualified teachers. In fact, the fastest workforce growth over the past ten years has been in these non-teaching positions.  This has meant that throughout the recession rollercoaster of recent years, employment levels in the education sector as a whole have risen robustly, and this resilience in the face of the recession should be encouraging for those looking for a variety of jobs within education.”

 

REAL WAGES

 

Overall, the public purse afford 220,000 more full-time education jobs between 2002 and 2014 – the second highest workforce increase, behind only the technology industry (which added 360,000 to its workforce over the same 12 years).

 

But while education may have weathered the recession better than other sectors in terms of headcount, the flipside of the coin is that this proliferation of non-teaching staff in school has held back teachers’ pay. Real wages in education have dipped by 9.8%, taking the average salary to £37,976.

 

This was a more severe drop than the typical trend seen across the country. On average, real wages across the UK economy fell 7.5% between 2002 and 2014.

 

Occupation Average 2002 wage (in 2014 £) Average 2014 wage (in 2014 £) Increase in real wages (2002-14)
Transport professional 53,048 76,281 43.8%
Social worker 33,405 31,934 -4.4%
Nurse 33,358 31,559 -5.4%
Travel agent 22,125 20,775 -6.1%
Electrician 34,037 31,150 -8.5%
Engineering professional 45,948 41,959 -8.7%
Retail sales assistant 18,381 16,704 -9.1%
Education professional 42,115 37,976 -9.8%
Technology professional 50,347 44,780 -11.1%
Police officer 44,488 39,292 -11.7%
Accountant 51,761 42,244 -18.4%
Building trades 42,560 26,492 -37.8%
Management consultant 83,355 47,424 -43.1%
All UK full-time workers 36,193 33,475 -7.5%

 

Table 2: Real full-time wages for selected occupations 2002-14

 

PUBLIC SECTOR BETTER INSULATED – BUT AUSTERITY STILL EVIDENT

 

Randstad’s analysis reveals that occupations dominated by public sector employers have proven more recession-proof than those with staff predominantly employed by private sector. For instance, the total full-time wage bill for social work and nursing has grown by over 20% since 2012, coupled with below-average fall in real wages of 4% and 5% respectively.

 

But the impact of austerity measures is evident in key public sector occupations since 2011, with the majority of the real wage cuts experienced by teaching and educational professionals, social workers and nurses has happened in the past three years.  Teaching and educational professionals experienced a 7% decline in real wages since 2011, outpacing real wage gains in 2002-6 and no change across 2007-10.  

 

Occupation Change in real wages (2002-6) Change in real wages (2007-10) Change in real wages (2011-14)
Social worker 7.5% -0.5% -3.9%
Transport professional 4.8% 6.8% 13.7%
Police officer 3.2% -2.5% -8.1%
Education professional 2.3% 0.0% -6.9%
Technology professional 1.6% -3.7% -5.2%
Nurse 0.0% 3.2% -6.4%
Electrician -0.3% 3.9% -4.0%
Travel agent -0.7% -0.4% -3.9%
Accountant -1.3% -6.1% -3.7%
Engineering professional -1.8% -0.9% -4.1%
Retail sales assistant -4.8% -0.4% -5.0%
Building trades -11.9% -10.3% -12.8%
Management consultant -17.8% -6.3% -10.4%
All UK full-time workers 3.8% -0.9% -5.9%

 

Table 3: Change in real wages in different economic conditions 2002-14

 

Jenny Rollinson concludes: “Professions with a large proportion of private sector employment certainly enjoy some extra cushioning against the knocks of an economic downturn, and the take-off in the number of wider education workers over this period is testament to that fact. Only the trendy fast-growing technology sector has witnessed better employment growth. Working for a growing industry – like education – shelters you from some of the worst symptoms of economic downturn. Even if your school is closed down or there are budget cuts in your local authority, you can be confident that you will be able to find another position – a luxury many other occupations don’t share.

 

“But public sector occupations can’t be insulated entirely, and it’s not just job security that you have to worry about when a recession strikes. Wage security is a worry for the staff that remain, as the ratio of candidates to roles skyrockets. In the case of education jobs, as the workforce grows to accommodate school children numbers, real wages have found themselves exposed. But the impact has been much more concentrated in the later years of the economic recovery, as austerity cuts bite, and education salaries actually found a safe haven in the immediate aftermath of the crash – lessening the impact we see today.”

 

[1] Based on an analysis of the ONS Annual Survey of Hours and Employment and the Labour Force Survey from 2002 to 2014, with supplementary data from The Financial Reporting Council.

[2] Mean average wages have been adjusted for changes in the Retail Prices Index with all figures stated in 2014 values.

New Kortext analytics dashboard gives universities greater insights into student learning

Kortext, the UK’s leading digital textbook platform, has launched a new analytics dashboard to give lecturers and university staff unprecedented insights into how students are engaging with their digital learning content.

 

On a day-to-day basis, Kortext Analytics gives lecturers access to data that will show how students on their modules are engaging with core reading and resources. On a more strategic level, it aims to help universities improve student engagement and progression as the data can be correlated with other university data to track students’ overall progress.

 

At a glance, using quick-view charts, graphs and tables, lecturers can see how many students on their modules have accessed their digital textbooks. They can also compare how students are using them, such as pages read and notes taken. 

 

Andy Alferovs, managing director of Kortext, said: “When universities give their students printed textbooks, they have no way of knowing if, and how, students are engaging with them. However, with digital versions, universities can access valuable usage data that can be combined with other student data to drive engagement, progression and improve learning outcomes.” 

 

Matthew Lawson, head of library and learning enhancement at Middlesex University, said: “The analytics dashboard that Kortext has developed provides a major enhancement of their platform. From within Kortext, module leaders can observe how their students are using their free personal etextbooks and managers can get an overview across the whole university. Over the coming months we will be exploring how engagement with etextbooks impacts on student achievement.”

 

Dr Geoff Bunn, senior lecturer, Department of Psychology, at Manchester Metropolitan University said: “Kortext Analytics is an easy to use and intuitive dashboard. I can see how many students on my psychology course have accessed our ebook so far, which is extremely useful to know.”

 

For more information, please visit http://www.kortext.com/Kortext Analytics

Cartoon book encourages children to become plumbers

Young children are being encouraged to think about a career in plumbing in a new book for three to seven-year-olds called ‘My Mummy is a Plumber’.

The book has been published by Butterfly Books, in collaboration with WaterSafe, the national accreditation scheme for plumbers which promotes best practice in the industry.

Butterfly Books aims to raise awareness of future careers for children at a young age to help reduce skills shortages and promote more traditional male jobs to young women.

Julie Spinks, of WaterSafe, said: “We were delighted to work with the authors on the My Mummy is a Plumber book which shows how she saves the day to tackle burst water pipes and overflowing toilets.

“WaterSafe is keen to support young people coming into plumbing, particularly through apprentice schemes, and this books supports our own campaign, Get Girls Plumbing, to encourage more women to consider plumbing as a career.”

Butterfly Books has already released ‘My Mummy is an Engineer’ and is also working on ‘My Mummy is a Scientist’. A ‘My Daddy’ series is due to follow.

Author Kerrine Bryan, said: “We hope that the books will educate children on the world of work, and the wider range of careers open to them.  In creating My Mummy is a Plumber we also learnt a bit about basic plumbing too!”

The book is available to buy at www.butterflybooks.uk for £6.99, plus postage and packaging, and a percentage of profits is donated to children’s charities.

To find your nearest WaterSafe accredited plumbing business and plumbers qualified to work safely with drinking water in your home visit www.watersafe.org.uk and enter your postcode.

Lumi announces expansion of Meetoo into the education sector

Lumi, a global leader in real-time audience insight technology, has today announced the launch of its free* cloud-based education platform, Meetoo.

 

The platform, which enhances learning through live student polling, digital conversations, access to live reports and the collation of anonymous feedback facilitates productive classroom interaction between students and teachers; a daily challenge in all schools and colleges.

 

Meetoo tackles a common issue in today’s learning environments, that of students paying more attention to their personal digital gadgets than they do to their lecturer. With Meetoo, educators can now harness technology to create a more dynamic and responsive classroom experience, leading to better learning outcomes and more involved students.

 

Originally developed to create more interactive and productive business meetings, Meetoo has been adopted by a number of such prestigious international corporations including PwC, KPMG and AIG.

 

A number of Higher Education institutions, including Coventry University, the University of Chester and the University of Central Lancashire, have reported a measurable improvement in student/lecturer classroom interaction. Michael Anthony Wood at the University of Central Lancashire said, “Students love Meetoo’s mobile functionality whilst our lecturers find it a simple and effective way to gain student insights as well as instantly providing formative feedback.”

 

Jon Fowler, Head of Lumi’s Education Business Unit, said, “I am excited about Meetoo’s potential in education.  We have been working closely with several education institutions in the past year to fully understand their needs. To date the reaction has been significantly positive.”

 

Meetoo is compatible with any Internet enabled device and the native app is available for both iOS and Android. Easy, efficient and clearly effective, Meetoo is ideally suited for use in classroom environments and can be applied to up to 1000 students.